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A Streetcar Named Desire [Turtleback]

Tennessee Williams
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)

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Kindle Edition CDN $7.15  
Library Binding CDN $21.33  
Turtleback, August 1989 --  
Paperback CDN $11.72  
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Book Description

August 1989 0606034811 978-0606034814 25th
Starring Rosemary Harris as the vulnerable Blanche DuBois, this dazzling drama of love, lust, and unbridled passion set against the steamy backdrop of New Orleans is an unrivaled classic of modern American theatre. This recording features the cast of the smash revival in 1973 at Lincoln Center.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Review

Lyrical and poetic and human and heartbreaking and memorable and funny.--Francis Ford Coppola --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Tennessee Williams (1911 - 1983) first won recognition with the Broadway production of The Glass Menagerie in 1945, followed by his masterpiece, A Streetcar named Desire in 1947. Later hits included Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Suddenly Last Summer, Sweet Bird of Youth, and Night of the Iguana.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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First Sentence
The exterior of a two-story corner building on a street in New Orleans which is named Elysian Fields and runs between the L & N tracks and the river. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By C. Dey
Format:Paperback
I read this play for school and I had heard of it before but I thought it was a novel, not a play. Before reading this play, the only plays I had read were Cyrano and quite a few by Shakespeare which are plays from before the 20th century I am pretty sure. Luckily for me A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE was written in the 20th century so I found it easy to understand and follow. The characters were well developed (though I am not surprised seeing as Vivian Leigh starred in the film version).

This play was also funny, especially with the character Stanley. Some lines in this play I will not easily forget and some parts I would even like to write down for future reference.

What I really liked about this play was that all or almost all of the scenes were in Stanley and Stella's house (of course they didn't just stay there, there was mention of places they had been off stage). I just found that to be comforting and easy to visualize and I really don't like change so this suited me just fine.

Because this play was so easy to visualize, I could picture it and hear the actors voices. I loved Mitch and Blanche together and all the characters had likable and not likable characteristics, making them realistic.

I read that Tennessee Williams also wrote THE GLASS MENAGERIE, I want to read that as well.

4.5/5

reviewed by Callie at Handle Like Hendrix
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4.0 out of 5 stars *A Streetcar named Desire* Jan. 19 2004
By Lisa
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"A Streetcar named Desire" is one of Tennessee Williams' masterpieces,
published in 1947.
The play is about the Southern Belle Blanche duBois who comes to live with
her sister Stella in New Orleans. There she is confronted with her sister's
husband Stanley who wants to destroy Blanche's life. The conflict between
Stanley and Blanche gets worse and it comes to a rape.
In the following scenes Stella has to decide whether she believes in her
sister or in Stanley.
The play gets more and more exciting and your interest will b e caught by
the development of the plot.
In his book Williams tries to assimilate his own life which was dominated by
his brutal father. Also the autobiographical aspect makes the play worth
reading.
Further I would recommend you to read the book because it contains numerous
themes which are still relavant today. So love, lonliness and cruelty play an
important role. Moreover easy and colloquial language is used.
All in all the play "A Streetcar named Desire" is really recommendable.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fallen Woman Jan. 18 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
It amazes me how few people young people have actually read through "A Streetcar Named Desire". Tennessee Williams is certainly one of America's trademark playwrites of the past century, along with Arthur Miller. His stories are timeless and his characters are unforgettable.
The immortal character of Blanche DuBois is a classic icon, a woman who's lost not only her material wealth but her virtue. In her last attempt to hold onto some shred of happiness, she goes to stay with her sister, Stella, and Stella's working class husband, Stanley Kowalski. Blanche's fortune has been lost, but she attempts to maintain her dignity and stature as a debutant. Stanley however, is repulsed by the fallen woman, convinced she is not only snobby, but hiding Stella's share of the family fortune. What he discovers is that Blanche has created quite a reputation by having numerous affairs with random men in the surrounding communities. To spite her, he ruins her last chance at getting married and pushes her into the realm of insanity.
A Streetcar Named Desire is a blunt look at the violence of lower class life and how it clashes with the upperclass. Everyone should read this American classic once, if not for the historical benefit, but for amazing dialogues that have been quoted over the years. At this point, pretty everyone knows the phrase, "I have always depended on the kindness of strangers", but few realize its origin or the context in which it was spoken. I think its about time everyone knew.
Happy Reading!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Struggles of the South Sept. 24 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams, is a story of gender discrimination, insanity, and rape. When Blanch Dubois is forced to move in with her sister in New Orleans, she is in a very fragile state. Even so, she keeps an appearance of a strong woman by living in her own world. She fools most people into believing that there is nothing wrong with her. But the one person she is unable to hide the truth from is Stella's husband Stanley. Determined to reveal the true Blanch to the rest of the world Stanley searches her past. He finds out things that end the relationship she was having with his friend Mitch, and then finally drives her over the edge when he rapes her. But the story isn't just about the struggles of Blanch. The story is about the change from the old south to the new south. Blanch, representing the way things used to be, picked apart by Stanley, who is the perfect symbol of the changing times. She, like the old south, is unable to survive in the new south and eventually just fades away.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Strugles of the South Sept. 24 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams, is a story of gender discrimination, insanity, and rape. When Blanch Dubois is forced to move in with her sister in New Orleans, she is in a very fragile state. Even so, she keeps an appearance of a strong woman by living in her own world. She fools most people into believing that there is nothing wrong with her. But the one person she is unable to hide the truth from is Stella's husband Stanley. Determined to reveal the true Blanch to the rest of the world Stanley searches her past. He finds out things that end the relationship she was having with his friend Mitch, and then finally drives her over the edge when he rapes her. But the story isn't just about the struggles of Blanch. The story is about the change from the old south to the new south. Blanch, representing the way things used to be, picked apart by Stanley, who is the perfect symbol of the changing times. She, like the old south, is unable to survive in the new south and eventually just fades away.
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Most recent customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Thought I was buying a novel,the orgiinal story from the author but it...
i did not realise it was the play and find it hard to read there is not much more to tell.
Published 11 months ago by P. Weetman
5.0 out of 5 stars Surpassed my expectations
I purchased A Street Car Named Desire and was more then satisfied with the quality of the used book. Read more
Published 19 months ago by EtherArchive
4.0 out of 5 stars Unexpectedly Good
I love watching plays but never really enjoyed reading them too much because of the lack of progression in my opinion. But I picked this up and just had to keep reading it! Read more
Published on March 7 2011 by Manley H
4.0 out of 5 stars Crushing play
Such a great play. It sucks you in and puts you face to face with Stanley. What an antihero, too. Engrossing and depressing - worth your time.
Published on Dec 13 2007 by Benjamin Anderson
5.0 out of 5 stars Poignant.
"A Streetcar Named Desire" is such a raw and captivating play. With luxurious characters full of rage, lust, and refutation, you'll be transported into the realm of... Read more
Published on March 26 2004 by MAB
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant
Yes, this is one of the most brilliant pieces of writing ever to grace the stage of the American theatre. Read more
Published on March 4 2004
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic
This play is simply wonderful. Williams crafts magnificent characters, especially Stanley and Blanche. Read more
Published on Feb. 25 2004 by K. Moore
5.0 out of 5 stars But'cha are Blanche! Ya are!!!!!
It sounds cliched to say this is a masterpiece of American Theatre, but that's exactly what it is. Being privelaged to have seen it on the stage no less than six times, and having... Read more
Published on Feb. 9 2004 by "chassymore6"
5.0 out of 5 stars great storytelling
This book is very good, I am glad I was forced to read it in school.
Published on Jan. 1 2004 by Dance Dance Dance
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