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Stress, Diet, and Your Heart Hardcover – Jan 1 1983


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Co (January 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0030490111
  • ISBN-13: 978-0030490118
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.7 x 3.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,645,148 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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This book describes a new program for treating and helping to prevent coronary heart disease. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Right after a massive heart attack, my cardiologist put me on the Ornish Program. Yes, my total cholesterol dropped, but so did my HDL (good cholesterol). My LDL (bad cholesterol) increased. Most alarmingly, in less than a month, my triglycerides more than doubled! My cardiologist had no explanation for this phenomenon. So, I ate even less fat (down to 5% of total calories). My blood chemistry did not improve.
Fortunately, I changed cardiologists and found that for about 25% of the population the low-fat diet of Ornish's approach actually triggers worse heart disease. This group has an inherited condition that causes small-particle LDL syndrome, a deadly condition that at least triples heart attack risk. (Patients with this condition are said to have Pattern B LDL subclass.) Even the staid American Heart Association last year recognized that for these patients, it is better to change the types of fat a patient eats (switching from saturated fats to monounsaturated fats) rather than drastically reducing fat intake.
Ornish ignores this phenomenon with the comment that some patients don't respond to his treatment. Not responding and getting worse are very different things. I would think that Ornish would at least avail himself of the advanced cholesterol testing that would identify patients who have genetically-caused small-particle LDL syndrome BEFORE treating them with a low-fat diet.
The rabid, no-fat-low-fat mantra may work for some patients, but for those who "don't respond", it is deadly, as proven by several scientific studies.
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By "maggiekats" on May 18 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book when it first came out, shortly after I was told I would be dead in two years. I followed it and am fine, my heart has not got any worse, and other factors of my health have improved
I am buying this book to send to a friend who is stressed out. I am also sending her his other excellent book, "Reversing Heart Disease..."
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
141 of 164 people found the following review helpful
Low-Fat Diets Are Dangerous For 25% Of The Population Jan. 20 2001
By Matthew J. Bayan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Right after a massive heart attack, my cardiologist put me on the Ornish Program. Yes, my total cholesterol dropped, but so did my HDL (good cholesterol). My LDL (bad cholesterol) increased. Most alarmingly, in less than a month, my triglycerides more than doubled! My cardiologist had no explanation for this phenomenon. So, I ate even less fat (down to 5% of total calories). My blood chemistry did not improve.
Fortunately, I changed cardiologists and found that for about 25% of the population the low-fat diet of Ornish's approach actually triggers worse heart disease. This group has an inherited condition that causes small-particle LDL syndrome, a deadly condition that at least triples heart attack risk. (Patients with this condition are said to have Pattern B LDL subclass.) Even the staid American Heart Association last year recognized that for these patients, it is better to change the types of fat a patient eats (switching from saturated fats to monounsaturated fats) rather than drastically reducing fat intake.
Ornish ignores this phenomenon with the comment that some patients don't respond to his treatment. Not responding and getting worse are very different things. I would think that Ornish would at least avail himself of the advanced cholesterol testing that would identify patients who have genetically-caused small-particle LDL syndrome BEFORE treating them with a low-fat diet.
The rabid, no-fat-low-fat mantra may work for some patients, but for those who "don't respond", it is deadly, as proven by several scientific studies. In fact, two recent studies by the University of California at Berkeley showed that even normal men (who did not have heart disease and who did not have small-particle LDL syndrome) began producing large amounts of small LDL particles when put on a low-fat diet. 41% of the test group converted to the deadly disease state in six weeks, thus tripling their heart attack risk.
For those with these inherited killer genes, a completely different approach is necessary. But most important, it's necessary to first use advanced cholesterol testing (sometimes called cholesterol subclass testing) to find out if a patient has the genetically-induced form of heart disease that responds badly to a low-fat diet. This testing is different than the oft-given cholesterol panel that shows HDL and LDL. Such panels are highly inaccurate in determining the presence of small-particle LDL syndrome.
Without advanced cholesterol testing, both heart patients and normal individuals who adopt a low-fat diet are playing Russian Roulette. The good news is that for those who have small-particle LDL syndrome, proper treatment can reverse coronary blockage without drugs or surgery. I know. I have this disease and after I got worse with Ornish's diet, my cardiologist and I watched my coronary blockage melt away with an approach that is totally different from what Ornish recommends.
46 of 52 people found the following review helpful
Saved my life! May 18 2000
By "maggiekats" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read this book when it first came out, shortly after I was told I would be dead in two years. I followed it and am fine, my heart has not got any worse, and other factors of my health have improved
I am buying this book to send to a friend who is stressed out. I am also sending her his other excellent book, "Reversing Heart Disease..."
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Helpful book! April 12 2008
By Marblehead - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The books by Ornish are most helpful and flow out of solid research. This is a good lifestyle to follow!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
This Is Very Important Reading July 6 2010
By Steven Rossellini - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm age 65. My wife died two years ago, just before her 61st birthday. I have always been athletic and very careful with my weight and body mass index. My LDL cholesterol numbers were always borderline high. Following my wife's death, within a few months, my LDL climbed to record numbers. All my health care professionals attributed the rise to my sorrow and its stress. My primary cardiologist told me to pick a statin (Lipitor, Mevacor, etc.)to lower my cholesterol. I had reservations about committing to a lifetime of cholesterol lowering medications. I consulted with my primary care physician, a D.O. He recommended more, but less intense, exercise and a diet that is dairy free and plant based. I began a little research project and came upon Dr. Dean Ornish's writings.

Thanks to Dr. Ornish's prescriptions for diet, stress relief, and exercise, my LDL dropped 26.8%...BOOM!PLUNGE! Am I a vegan?? Nope. I eat egg whites, daily. Once a week, I eat a 6 to 8 portion of a fatty fish, like salmon. Instead of meditating, I sing along with Lady GaGa and Beyonce. When I buy anything at the grocery, I read the label. If it has anything above zero cholesterol, I don't eat it.

I am convinced that the statins only change the numbers, but don't clear the mess from the veins and arteries. Men (maybe, women, too) follow the Ornish dietary and stress reduction program and you'll be amazed at what happens south of the beltline.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Stress diet and your heart March 10 2010
By D. R. Roberts - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Stress Diet and Your Heart: A Lifetime Program for Healing Your Heart Without Drugs or Surgery.
great book with good information. Delivered quickly and in good condition. A must for people with high cholesterol and Heart problems!

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