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Stroszek (Widescreen)

Bruno S. , Eva Mattes , Werner Herzog    Unrated   DVD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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Product Description

Amazon.ca

Stroszek is one of Werner Herzog's most accessible films, and one of his best. Herzog's clever use of kitschy folk music is just one perfect element in this mesmerizing, seriocomic "ballad" of America, in which a trio of unlikely friends leave their dreary lives in Berlin, certain that wealth and comfort await in America. Their naive American dream turns sour in rural Wisconsin, and the title character (played by Bruno S., the fascinating nonactor from Herzog's The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser) becomes an insanely tragic figure, celebrating a bitterly absurd Thanksgiving in the film's unforgettable closing scenes. By fusing his own intuitive, enigmatic style with factual details from the life of Bruno S., Herzog captures the elusive "ecstatic truth" that motivates his enduring cinematic vision. While deepening one of the most unusual actor-director collaborations in the history of film, Stroszek presents an American nightmare that's funny, bizarre, and deeply, magnificently human. --Jeff Shannon

Product Description

Bruno Stroszek is released from prison and ekes out a living as a street musician. He befriends Eva, a prostitute down on her luck. After they are harried and beaten by Eva's pimps, they join Bruno's neighbor, Scheitz, an elderly eccentric, when he leaves Germany to live in Wisconsin in search of the American dream.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Probably Herzog's Best Jan. 27 2005
Format:DVD
"Stroszek" is probably German director Werner Herzog's best film. It's a strange, unpredictable, and oddly funny movie. It's about a Berlin ex-con, Bruno Stroszek (played by a real-life disturbed street musician, Bruno S.), his prostitute girlfriend Eva, and his borderline-senile landlord Scheitz. After being repeatedly terrorized by Eva's pimps, they move to Wisconsin to live with some of Scheitz's friends and, hopefully, encounter the American dream. Revealing any more of the plot would be a crime. "Stroszek" not only has a terrific, haunting performance by Bruno S., but it contains the most fascinating depiction of America I have ever seen in a movie, as well as one of filmdom's funniest bank robberies.
The DVD has "Stroszek" in an aspect ratio of about 1.85:1. It's a bit grainy towards the beginning, but overall it looks pretty good, especially in the Wisconsin scenes. Of the extras, the most interesting is Herzog's commentary, basically an extended interview with a film historian named Norman Hill. It's a very fascinating blend of production tidbits, information about Bruno S., and some of Herzog's trademark tall tales. Also included are production notes (with are actually devoted more to film analysis and Herzog's relationship with Bruno S. than they are to production), a worthwhile Herzog biography, and a German trailer.
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Format:DVD
Werner Herzog's Stroszek (1977) is one of the ten greatest films ever made. It's almost equally as good as Herzog's The Enigma of Kasper Hauser (1974) and Aguirre the Wrath of God (1973).
Bruno S., the unknown soldier of cinema once again gives one of the finest performances I've ever seen. Eva Mattes is also wonderful as the prostitute Eva who along with Bruno and Herr Scheitz decide to emigrate from Berlin to Wisconsin to fulfill the elusive American dream. This tragicomedy is one of the bleakest films I've ever seen and also one of the funniest.
Herzog's brilliant film making style gives the entire film the look and feel of a documentary, yet like all of his films Stroszek is highly stylized. An absolute masterpiece! Rating: A 10 out of 10.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "Is This Really Me?" Aug. 4 2003
Format:DVD
Absolutely brilliant. Stroszek is THE quintessential film on the American experience. A dark fable revolving around the hopes and dreams of three postwar Germans and the disintegration of a relationship. But also incredibly funny and cynical. Herzog's best film to date, in my opinion.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 1st favorite farting film May 8 2004
Format:DVD
The 2nd favorite, if you are interested, is Good Morning, by Ozu, of course, of course.
I am not interested in contracting AIDS! Sorry!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  33 reviews
43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling to read these great reviews July 11 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:VHS Tape
It really is exciting to read these great reviews about "Stroszek." About twenty years ago, I met Herzog and was given the opportunity to play the young banker who reposesses the mobile home in this film. It was a wonderful experience...and something I look back on with great joy. I know I am biased, but this truly is a great film.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably Herzog's Best Jan. 27 2005
By J. Pinkerton Snoopington - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
"Stroszek" is probably German director Werner Herzog's best film. It's a strange, unpredictable, and oddly funny movie. It's about a Berlin ex-con, Bruno Stroszek (played by a real-life disturbed street musician, Bruno S.), his prostitute girlfriend Eva, and his borderline-senile landlord Scheitz. After being repeatedly terrorized by Eva's pimps, they move to Wisconsin to live with some of Scheitz's friends and, hopefully, encounter the American dream. Revealing any more of the plot would be a crime. "Stroszek" not only has a terrific, haunting performance by Bruno S., but it contains the most fascinating depiction of America I have ever seen in a movie, as well as one of filmdom's funniest bank robberies.
The DVD has "Stroszek" in an aspect ratio of about 1.85:1. It's a bit grainy towards the beginning, but overall it looks pretty good, especially in the Wisconsin scenes. Of the extras, the most interesting is Herzog's commentary, basically an extended interview with a film historian named Norman Hill. It's a very fascinating blend of production tidbits, information about Bruno S., and some of Herzog's trademark tall tales. Also included are production notes (with are actually devoted more to film analysis and Herzog's relationship with Bruno S. than they are to production), a worthwhile Herzog biography, and a German trailer.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Herzog's Humanity Sept. 10 2005
By Eileen Corder - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Stoszek is a extraordinary patchwork of reality and fiction, German and English, introspection and extroversion. It's many unique images do not go away: a bottle of water that captures a live Breugel-like snow scene, rifle-toting farmers on tractors defending their strip of land, a wizened little man testing fence posts with a voltmeter, and the truly haunting "Dancing Chicken". Herzog, with the eye and ear of a poet, captures these and more, including the unforgettable and weighty performances by the many amateur actors.

Most welcomed of this DVD is the commentary track by Herzog. It's like watching a second film. To see the same images while hearing his stories deepens the impact of Stroszek. We learn the fascinating backgrounds of the curious individuals involved: the dangerous Hamburg Prince, the compassionate doctor in the Preemie Ward, Al the trucker-pimp, Clayton the beer-swilling mechanic, the unnamed "extras" in the fields and truck stops of Wisconsin, and, of course, Bruno S. himself.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MASTERPIECE, ONE OF THE GREATEST FILMS EVER MADE! July 31 2003
By "youngvelvet" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Werner Herzog's Stroszek (1977) is one of the ten greatest films ever made. It's almost equally as good as Herzog's The Enigma of Kasper Hauser (1974) and Aguirre the Wrath of God (1973).
Bruno S., the unknown soldier of cinema once again gives one of the finest performances I've ever seen. Eva Mattes is also wonderful as the prostitute Eva who along with Bruno and Herr Scheitz decide to emigrate from Berlin to Wisconsin to fulfill the elusive American dream. This tragicomedy is one of the bleakest films I've ever seen and also one of the funniest.
Herzog's brilliant film making style gives the entire film the look and feel of a documentary, yet like all of his films Stroszek is highly stylized. An absolute masterpiece! Rating: A 10 out of 10.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Everyone Knows Dollars Grow on Trees in Wisconsin Oct. 31 2006
By Erika Borsos - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Werner Herzog, world reknown film maker and producer received the lifetime achievement award at the Sarasota Film Festival in April 2006. His films are primarily fictionalized documentaries. He adds fiction to bring focus on a larger truth by exaggerating events and making a bigger statement to prove his point. Herzog based the story of "Stroszek" on several real life events, some murders in Wisconsin and a street musician (who plays himself) who lived in Berlin, who was the son of a prostitute, who had been raised in reform schools and ended up in prison. He is lost in the real world because it is totally alien to him. Herzog provides an unusual cast of characters, many of whom are not actors, but play themselves, mostly working class (Wisconsin mechanics and Indians) and street low lifes (thugs in Berlin) who live unusually simple lives, just making ends meet in the world. The extra features include audio commentary with Werner Herzog who explains some of the innovative ideas on which he based the film. This is a tragi-comedy where no matter what improvements in life the main characters attempt, fate intervenes to twist them in a different direction, usually downward. There are humorous and ironic events which makes this a fascinating film from an artistic and creative aspect.

We meet Bruno Stroszek as he is being released from prison, he is given his belongings: cash, a flugel horn, his accordion and a lecture from the prison warden. The warden has a thankless job but when he sees someone released it brings him some measure of satisfaction: he lectures Bruno, to stop drinking beer which makes him crazy and break the a law. The warden tells him to buy a cup of coffee and a piece of pie instead. Bruno returns to the former apartment he shared with an eccentric elderly gentleman. He resumes relations with his prostitute girlfriend Eva, who is beaten up by street thugs. This event provides the impetus to emigrate to the United States, to Wisconsin, where the elderly gentleman had an American friend or cousin with whom he kept in touch.

In the US, Bruno gets a job as a mechanic, Eva becomes a waitress. They buy a mobile/trailer home and television set by taking a loan from the bank. It does not take long before they fall behind on their payments. They receive a visit from the bank loan officer, a very polite man, who makes it clear in the kindest of tones that unless they meet their obligations, the bank will confiscate their home and TV. Eva returns to her former way of life, finding clients at the truck stop restaurant, to provide extra money to pay the loan. Bruno falls into a funk, realizing no matter what they do, they will not make ends meet. Eva ends up leaving with a group of truckers to Canada ... Bruno and the elderly man go on a robbing spree, to get money in order to eat. It happens to be Thanksgiving, so the irony is they rob a store to buy a turkey. The elderly man is caught and arrested. Bruno's car breaks down but he obtains the truck from the mechanic's shop and goes on a driving rampage. He ends up at a Wisconsin tourist trap where he takes a ski lift type ride on which he sits and goes round and round. Prior to that he had turned on several of the exhibits in which different animals perform various tricks. The last scene is one of the most humorous and creative endings which earned Herzog fame. It depicts in a surreal manner that for some the American Dream becomes a bizarre nightmare from which there is no release. The film will appeal to those who are interested in unusual innovations and creativity in filmmaking. There is a lot of irony and off the wall humour which may appeal only to a selective audience. Erika Borsos {pepper flower}
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