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Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 Hardcover – Jan 14 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel; Cmc edition (Jan. 14 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785108750
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785108757
  • Product Dimensions: 26.3 x 18.6 x 2.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 866 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,011,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Steven Bove on July 24 2002
Format: Hardcover
WOW! I love this book! Back in the early seventies I came across a giant Sub-Mariner special which featured the first issues of Prince Namor from Tales to Astonish. I was in awe of Gene Colan's (Adam Austin) art. Buying this Marvel Masterworks edition reminded me how much of an influence it was on my own work. Stan Lee's stories are full of grandeur and excitement. Prince Namor, The Sub-Mariner wasn't an easy character to like but once you got use to his regal manner you were hooked into his under seas adventures. Jack Kirby and Bill Everett (Namor's creator) show up later in the series on art chores. However it's Gene Colan's amazing rendition of life under water that makes this strip work as well as it did. I seem to recall that Gene wasn't very fond of the work he did on Namor. The book suffers only in it's reproduction. The film negatives used seem very thin and fail to capture Vince Colletta's finer ink lines. The coloring, though great, is too harsh on the glossy stock Marvel seems insistent on using. A matte surface would really do justice to the work. For those of you who missed out on these tales, buy this book. Stan Lee's revival of Prince Namor is legendary.
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Format: Hardcover
This is truly the good stuff from the Silver-Age. By the time Sub-Mariner got his own comic, the stories had degraded to mush. But this collection of stories is a very good read. The opening plotline of Sub-Mariner's "quest" for the Trident of Neptune is the best of the bunch. Sub-Mariner was not this good in the 1940s and John Byrne's version in the 1990s was not this good. If only Marvel would issue the Incredible Hulk in a Masterworks Edition featuring the Tales to Astonish stories. What a bargain the kids of the 1960s got with Tales to Astonish! This is a must buy in the Masterworks collection.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
great sub mariner stories at a affordable price May 18 2010
By Michael Dobey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I love old comics, and the older submariner tales from the golden age were great and often more fantasy than the solid more grounded in a universe of characters approach. It's hard to imagine how much of a creative explosion that stan lee and the rest of the marvel crew were behind in the sixties. The sub-mariner isn't a really easy character to write for either. That being said the first 40 or so issues of this series were great stuff. The sub-mariner remains the arrogant but somehow decent character that you can still enjoy and not hate! It was wonderful to be able to read these stories and to enjoy the great artwork inside. Painted comics are fine; but I really wish that they'd put out some old style four color comics like these again too, but on good paper too. The art of Gene Colan really shines in this volume , the man is a incredible fluid artist and is highly underrated! For a added bonus you get two Jack Kirby drawn stories that are maybe more rushed than some of his work of the day; but a rushed kirby job still is a fantastic piece of work! And we even get a Bill Everett drawn story! Not to mention the great Wally Wood's Daredevil number 7 reprint. The masterworks series can really bring out how good the artwork is too because it's not on cheap old comic book paper. And Wood's art is just so ecclectic and wonderful by any standards. Another artist also lays down a decent story too , jerry G, These artists are all gone now : but not the great work they left us. And lets face it comics are a great artform in themselves; that are as good as ever to enjoy and admire.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The Early Days June 26 2012
By Jacktavish - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though I'd rather have the comics, Tales to Astonish are not only rare, but expensive.

It's a blast watching Gene Colan develop. At first he is somewhat hobbled by Vince Colletta's inking, but as his style develops, Colletta is forced to improve too. Bill Everett inks 2 issues, and their opposite styles really blend well. To my surprise, Colan's most stunning art (before Doctor Strange) are the two issues #80 & #81 inked boldly by Dick Ayers. The art is fluid and like distorted, odd-angle photographs. Though Colan would return for fill-ins on Sub-Mariner #'s 10, 11, and a run in the 40's, he never captured the majesty, arrogance and power of Namor as he did in the two best issues of TOS. The quest theme allows the extended storylines that Stan Lee excelled in. It's funny how Namor goes from being cool & stand-offish to the smitten Dorma, but a few issues later is head-over-heels & launching into violent tirades of jealousy. Much of the writing is humorous since Namor is so headstrong and sometimes insulting to his minions. Lucky for us he never took anger management classes.

The issues by Jerry Grandinetti & Bill Everett are good too, though Everett's style was so stylized, it looked dated by the '60's (& pre-historic by the mid-70's, before his untimely death). But let's be clear, Everett created Sub-Mariner by himself. Part of Stan Lee's genius was bringing back characters from another era, like Subby & Cap, and making them exciting to newer fans.

The Kirby fill-ins are fantastic, because The King never got to draw Namor & Iron Man enough. Usually just guest-stint in early FF or Avengers. His Iron Man is classic, and even if you don't like his take on Namor, no one, but nobody draws action sequences like Kirby. On top of that, you get a Wally Wood Daredevil vs. Sub Mariner issue, at the peak of Wood's style. Overall a fine collection at a decent price.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Probably the only really good Sub-Mariner stories Aug. 16 2002
By David Stager - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is truly the good stuff from the Silver-Age. By the time Sub-Mariner got his own comic, the stories had degraded to mush. But this collection of stories is a very good read. The opening plotline of Sub-Mariner's "quest" for the Trident of Neptune is the best of the bunch. Sub-Mariner was not this good in the 1940s and John Byrne's version in the 1990s was not this good. If only Marvel would issue the Incredible Hulk in a Masterworks Edition featuring the Tales to Astonish stories. What a bargain the kids of the 1960s got with Tales to Astonish! This is a must buy in the Masterworks collection.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Primer for Gene Colan Fans Oct. 29 2012
By Americo Zeccardi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While I was never a big Namor fan (and this boy growing up in The Bronx had to watch where he plunked down his 12 cents for a Marvel fix) he was involved in tales with the Avengers and Fantastic Four so I knew his origins story. Most of the Sub Mariner stories here are circa 1966 and have SUCH a total '60's feel to them. I have always loved Gene Colan's work. At this point he was working for DC and wanted to work on Namor so the pseudonym Adam Austin (Adam was a baby name he and his wife were considering) was born. Stan Lee claims not to know why in the foreward but any history of Marvel will reveal how woefully underpaid these guys were. Anyway if you like Gene you MUST check this out because with the exception of 4 stories- the 1939 origin, a Daredevil #7 pencilled by Wally Wood and 2 Kirby stories it's all Austin nee Colan, such a treat to watch the evolution of an artist. Gene in an interview expressed displeasure in his early SM work but IMO it's just a perfectionist never being totally happy with the finished product. The deep sea panels are beautiful, I suggest you check them out for yourself as I uploaded a few. As for the stories, eh, never a fan of all Namor's regal posturing but it had its' place. This was a favorite of Stan Lee's and I love it as it showcases the artwork of Gene Colan.
Sub-Mariner!! The greatest!!! Nov. 22 2014
By lawrence f dorr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
When I was a kid, growing up on the Atlantic, I had a connection with Namor. Aquaman never did it for me. When I was in the ocean all day I wanted to be Subby. Angry because of the injustice done to his people by the human race, Namor was a much more complex character than most. He was def before his time, being an anti-hero and his speech and cry of "Imperious Rex" was a declaration of the underdog. I loved his quick temper and his immaculate physique, I had no access to his old stories-give or take a couple in "History of Comic" books that were published at the time, so it all began here, in these stories for me.
I had never read the Daredevil #7 by Wally Wood , which is, as mentioned here, a very special comic. I can't really put my finger on why it's so great- there is something very special about it, not just the art, story etc., but it really stands out. Maybe it's the way Namor is portrayed as a very stoic yet ethically/morally correct figure and it's meshing with Wood's illustration?
The "Quest for the Trident" story line is stellar. It's a real "Hero's Journey" story. Namor having to prove himself by obtaining the Trident, that Neptune himself has offered up to the real ruler of the Atlantis. Namor's obstructions are enormous:massive Octopus, Seaweed man, Deadly Diamonds, and my fave, the Faceless Ones!! Krang is the prime antagonist, not only wanting Namor's spot as ruler, but also his love for The altruistic Lady Dorma!! Krang's "RoboTank" stands out as one of the great weapons. From issue 70 to 76 tension is high. In 76 Namor finally gets his hands on Krang, who of course,has more tricks up his sleeve! Krang then gets Puppet Master to help him out, which he does by awakening the Behemoth!!! Subby fights the scientific surface man over the polluted water/nuclear testing; represented by Hank Pym (Ant-Man), and Namor's time in NYC always provides illustrations with verve and flair and action at it's peak!!
I don't need to mention the amazing art by Adam Austin (Gene Colans pen name) which just gets better as the story moves along- this has been mentioned over and over in these reviews. I never believed to this day that Subby gets the respect he deserves in the Marvel Universe. I understand that his ambiguity is probably the reason for this. He is one of my favorite characters and this is the best place to start. Stan's Trident Search story is in his top 10 in my opinion ever. I think he has a great respect for the character and it shows tremendously in this collection.


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