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Suspect Zero (Widescreen Collection)

Aaron Eckhart , Ben Kingsley , E. Elias Merhige    R (Restricted)   DVD
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Product Description

Eckhart/Kingsley/Moss ~ Suspect Zero

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Most helpful customer reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Definitely a Thriller Sept. 25 2005
Format:DVD
Interesting concept of 'remote viewing' taken a step further. IT has the same dark quality of the movie 'Seven'. The story was a bit confusing at points especially the relationship between Eckhart and Moss. Some of the cinematography also confused point of views of Eckhart and Kingsley. Both Eckhart and Kingsley's characters are strong and appealing. Kingsley is particularly scary. A few jumping scenes but not overly frighting. More intriguing for the moral issues. Is it acceptable or not to murder serial killers. The special features provided a few interesting vignettes on 'remote viewing' in the US. I'd like to see it again to pick up on the things I missed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated horror movie Sept. 22 2010
Format:DVD
As the title says, very good and suspenseful movie with great acting especially by Sir Ben Kingsley. Great stuff. DVD is also loaded with extras.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Far from your typical serial killer film July 12 2006
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
A serial killer killing serial killers? I don't know that that's a bad thing - especially since this guy specializes in serial killers the cops haven't even suspected yet. He's got a great little signature, too - a note featuring a zero with a slash through it, and he makes life imitate art by making his victims' eyes look like the one in the picture. Who do you get to play a madman like this? Gandhi, of course. Yes, Ben Kingsley, the man who played Mr. Nonviolent Protest himself, is the guy targeting serial killers here in Suspect Zero - and he plays the role exceedingly well, I might add.

Suspect Zero is, in my opinion, somewhat underrated. To me, it made perfect sense all along. It's a little confusing at first seeing conspicuously red-tinted images flashing buy out of nowhere, but it becomes clear pretty early on that the man being hunted is a remote viewer. Even if you aren't familiar with the concept of remote viewing, it's hard not to figure it out, so I'm not sure why some people seem to come away from this movie feeling totally lost. In a nutshell, remote viewing, which has absolutely been used by American intelligence and the FBI, allows the sensitive viewer to "see" things happening elsewhere, be they missile silos, enemy forces, or serial killers doing what serial killers do. Since Benjamin O'Ryan (Kingsley) can see the crimes, he can find the criminals. That's what he is doing now, taking out unidentified serial killers with just a little bit of vengeance. The big kahuna, though, is still out there - the killer he calls Suspect Zero. Suspect Zero has made a veritable cottage industry of abducting and killing kids in countless numbers all over the country.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  110 reviews
34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An original suspense flick, not just a cop chasing serial killer movie. Overlooked potential classic Oct. 25 2006
By Wiseguy 945 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I am usually a huge fan of good suspense movie, but how I missed this one when it came out is unknown. This movie starts off as one that may seem to be about an FBI agent that burned out on "the big case", got demoted, and transfer to the smaller town to keep him busy in paperwork. Thomas Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart, also in the recent film Thanks for Smoking), is this agent, who happens to stumble across, as guessed, a big case in the small town. Benjamin O'Ryan (Ben Kingsley) is a person that becomes of interest to agent Mackelway. Well, this movie does have some of the same things as other suspense thrillers, similar in ways to SEVEN, but with different twist and a much different outcome. In all, a must see if you like suspense thriller. If you liked the movie Seven with brad pitt and Morgan Freeman, then this movie is right up your alley. Check it out, a must own for any suspense fan.
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very cool serial killer film. If you like CSI and Law and Order, you might like this Sept. 10 2006
By Concerned One - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
This movie was a very big surprise to me when I discoverd it. Ben Kingsley, Aaron Eckhart, and Kerry Anne-Moss all have strong roles and characters in this film. Eckhart plays an FBI agent who got busted down in ranks and starts over in a desk job in the southwest US. He is assigned a case that quickley becomes more than just a missing persons/murder investigation. Through-out the film, Ben Kingsley and him develop a very unique bond that pulls us throug the movie and keeps us on the edge of our seats until the end. All thing are connected, pretty tight storyline. This is a psychological thriller that should please anyfan of movies like Identity, The Jacket, The Woodsman, and The Machinist. Also Fans of CSI and Law and Order may like this too. This film does not have the boundaries of TV ratings, so it is more gruesome. A must see.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars STUNNING, INTELLIGENT, VISUALLY RICH THRILLER March 25 2005
By Robin Simmons - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Fact one: Since 1970, more than 90,000 persons have disappeared without a trace. Fact two: "Remote viewing," the ability to access information using the mind alone appears to be a real skill (and something the government has secretly funded)

Edmund Elias Merhige's SUSPECT ZERO (Paramount) is about a chastised FBI agent who may have innate "remote viewing" skills and a serial killer who definitely does.

Merhige's previous films, "Begotten" and "Shadow of the Vampire," are as different from each other as "Suspect Zero" is from either of them.

The tantalizing plot of this film was widely known before production began. But I won't spoil it for anyone who plans to see the DVD. Here's the set up: Aaron Eckhart is a troubled FBI agent relocated from Dallas to a southwestern desert town. A local killing with cultic elements connects with something from his past. Eckhart's former partner, an alienated Carrie-Anne Moss, gets involved. From the start, but known only to the audience, Ben Kingsley is revealed as a very twisted serial killer.

This visually rich, fascinating film is not about so much "who dunnit" but the more about the "why." It's not really a serial killer story and it's not a procedural crime drama about how the killer is caught. Something else is going on here. Director Merhige gives a clue in his cryptic statement: "You must address the underneath (the darkness), or it will devour your... It's the only way to heal the future from devouring itself."

To fully enjoy this unusual film, pay close attention to all the visual elements and then see it again with Merhige's commentary that explains his personal take on this story.

There's a stunning 4 part featurette: "What We See When We Close Our Eyes" and a startling Remote Viewing demonstration involving Merhige himself.
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OK, this movie should be really, really bad. Oct. 2 2006
By Eric Hofmann - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I've come to believe one thing: Paramount makes great movies...Aeon Flux was the exception...

I saw this movie and texted a couple of people, with no positive response...its from Paramount thats a plus. Carrie-Anne Moss who spends her time underacting in such pretty good movies like the Matrix, Reloaded, Revolutions, Memento (which she was pretty good in) and Red Planet. She plays emotionless, yet excitable women, usually and this role is no exception. I have a thing for noses and hers is awful and distracts me through the entire movie. She is definitely an iron weight on this movie, but she does offer a little something...she blends in real well and is forgettable as Detective Kulok.

Aaron Eckhart has been also seen in Paycheck, Erin Brochovich and Any Given Sunday. His acting seems dry and tedious, but he brings something intangible to the screen. It doesn't excite or electrify, but he captivates in "Suspect Zero". He Plays Detective Mackelway.

Oh, yeah there's this other guy, named Sir Ben Kingsley in the movie. He plays the other character, Ben O'Ryan. Ben Kingsley has made alot of roles shine over the years, but none so much as in "Suspect Zero".

The movie centers around three FBI Agents and a case of people gone missing and murdered in New Mexico, specifically on the state line. Yes, it seems like an X-Files Episode in places. Some very strange elements shake nicely into this believable framework and hide a neat science fiction background.

The general interaction between Kingsley and Eckhart is hard to understand, but awesome. The scenes between Carrie-Anne Moss and Aaron Eckhart are forced and laid in, to seem like the X-Files, perhaps. Ignore them, ignore them! Its OK...there's only one or two...get a soda from the kitchen. If you want fast paced drama, this is not your movie. It tends to be like rush hour-the time of day...50 miles an hour...stop...50 miles and hour...stop. It is excellent and underrated. Go buy it...its real cheap, its worth it.
24 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Far from your typical serial killer film July 5 2005
By Daniel Jolley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
A serial killer killing serial killers? I don't know that that's a bad thing - especially since this guy specializes in serial killers the cops haven't even suspected yet. He's got a great little signature, too - a note featuring a zero with a slash through it, and he makes life imitate art by making his victims' eyes look like the one in the picture. Who do you get to play a madman like this? Gandhi, of course. Yes, Ben Kingsley, the man who played Mr. Nonviolent Protest himself, is the guy targeting serial killers here in Suspect Zero - and he plays the role exceedingly well, I might add.

Suspect Zero is, in my opinion, somewhat underrated. To me, it made perfect sense all along. It's a little confusing at first seeing conspicuously red-tinted images flashing buy out of nowhere, but it becomes clear pretty early on that the man being hunted is a remote viewer. Even if you aren't familiar with the concept of remote viewing, it's hard not to figure it out, so I'm not sure why some people seem to come away from this movie feeling totally lost. In a nutshell, remote viewing, which has absolutely been used by American intelligence and the FBI, allows the sensitive viewer to "see" things happening elsewhere, be they missile silos, enemy forces, or serial killers doing what serial killers do. Since Benjamin O'Ryan (Kingsley) can see the crimes, he can find the criminals. That's what he is doing now, taking out unidentified serial killers with just a little bit of vengeance. The big kahuna, though, is still out there - the killer he calls Suspect Zero. Suspect Zero has made a veritable cottage industry of abducting and killing kids in countless numbers all over the country. There's no discernible link between all of the missing kids, so know one even suspects that the world's foremost killer is out there operating with a free hand, nor would anyone believe that one man could claim literally hundreds of victims without getting caught. O'Ryan knows it, though - he has seen it.

The endgame, for whatever reason, involves Special Agent Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart), and O'Ryan is constantly faxing him cryptic clues and missing children's posters in an obvious attempt to draw the agent to him . Mackelway has something of a history, having taken the law into his own hands to some degree and, by so doing, letting a violent killer go free. As he gets deeper and deeper into this case, he begins having cryptic little visions and develops some kind of connection with the man he is searching for (troubling signs for an agent who's already had to go through an extensive psychological evaluation recently). It stands to reason that the whole gang will assemble at the very end -O'Ryan, Mackelway, and, of course, Suspect Zero himself - and that Mackelway will have to get there without much help from his disbelieving colleagues.

By and large, I think Suspect Zero is an excellent film. It's a thriller with a twist, an unusual story that plays out quite well. Unfortunately, it seems to take a shortcut or two on its way to a conclusion, leaving too much in the hands of fate or coincidence. It also has to go and give us two partners with a romantic history teaming up again - apparently, it's illegal to make a crime thriller without some kind of romantic subplot. Eckhart isn't bad, but he isn't completely convincing as he takes his character to the brink between insight and insanity. Besides his partner Fran (Carrie-Anne Moss), the rest of the characters barely emerge from the woodwork, especially Mackelways' supervisor (who doesn't even yell when he's upset with his rogue agent).

Despite a few minor faults, though, the unusual storyline of Suspect Zero and the excellent performance by Ben Kingsley carry the day, making this film stand out quite noticeably from others in the genre. Dark, gritty, and compelling, it's a film well worth watching, especially for those who harbor a fascination with serial killers.
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