Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

CDN$ 6.67 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by vidco

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Warehouse105 Add to Cart
CDN$ 6.67
spazz_attack Add to Cart
CDN$ 6.97
SURPLUSDVD NEW YORK Add to Cart
CDN$ 7.49
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Suspect Zero (Widescreen Collection)

Aaron Eckhart , Ben Kingsley , E. Elias Merhige    R (Restricted)   DVD
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 9.65
Price: CDN$ 6.67
You Save: CDN$ 2.98 (31%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 8 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by vidco.
Today Only: Up to 68% off "Chuck: The Complete Series"
Own Chuck: The Complete Series at a one-day special price.

Frequently Bought Together

Suspect Zero (Widescreen Collection) + Citizen X (Full Screen)
Price For Both: CDN$ 16.62

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

  • Citizen X (Full Screen) CDN$ 9.95

Product Details


Product Description

Eckhart/Kingsley/Moss ~ Suspect Zero

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.3 out of 5 stars
4.3 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Far from your typical serial killer film July 11 2006
By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
A serial killer killing serial killers? I don't know that that's a bad thing - especially since this guy specializes in serial killers the cops haven't even suspected yet. He's got a great little signature, too - a note featuring a zero with a slash through it, and he makes life imitate art by making his victims' eyes look like the one in the picture. Who do you get to play a madman like this? Gandhi, of course. Yes, Ben Kingsley, the man who played Mr. Nonviolent Protest himself, is the guy targeting serial killers here in Suspect Zero - and he plays the role exceedingly well, I might add.

Suspect Zero is, in my opinion, somewhat underrated. To me, it made perfect sense all along. It's a little confusing at first seeing conspicuously red-tinted images flashing buy out of nowhere, but it becomes clear pretty early on that the man being hunted is a remote viewer. Even if you aren't familiar with the concept of remote viewing, it's hard not to figure it out, so I'm not sure why some people seem to come away from this movie feeling totally lost. In a nutshell, remote viewing, which has absolutely been used by American intelligence and the FBI, allows the sensitive viewer to "see" things happening elsewhere, be they missile silos, enemy forces, or serial killers doing what serial killers do. Since Benjamin O'Ryan (Kingsley) can see the crimes, he can find the criminals. That's what he is doing now, taking out unidentified serial killers with just a little bit of vengeance. The big kahuna, though, is still out there - the killer he calls Suspect Zero. Suspect Zero has made a veritable cottage industry of abducting and killing kids in countless numbers all over the country.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Definitely a Thriller Sept. 25 2005
Format:DVD
Interesting concept of 'remote viewing' taken a step further. IT has the same dark quality of the movie 'Seven'. The story was a bit confusing at points especially the relationship between Eckhart and Moss. Some of the cinematography also confused point of views of Eckhart and Kingsley. Both Eckhart and Kingsley's characters are strong and appealing. Kingsley is particularly scary. A few jumping scenes but not overly frighting. More intriguing for the moral issues. Is it acceptable or not to murder serial killers. The special features provided a few interesting vignettes on 'remote viewing' in the US. I'd like to see it again to pick up on the things I missed.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated horror movie Sept. 22 2010
Format:DVD
As the title says, very good and suspenseful movie with great acting especially by Sir Ben Kingsley. Great stuff. DVD is also loaded with extras.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  187 reviews
47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An original suspense flick, not just a cop chasing serial killer movie. Overlooked potential classic Oct. 25 2006
By Wiseguy 945 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I am usually a huge fan of good suspense movie, but how I missed this one when it came out is unknown. This movie starts off as one that may seem to be about an FBI agent that burned out on "the big case", got demoted, and transfer to the smaller town to keep him busy in paperwork. Thomas Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart, also in the recent film Thanks for Smoking), is this agent, who happens to stumble across, as guessed, a big case in the small town. Benjamin O'Ryan (Ben Kingsley) is a person that becomes of interest to agent Mackelway. Well, this movie does have some of the same things as other suspense thrillers, similar in ways to SEVEN, but with different twist and a much different outcome. In all, a must see if you like suspense thriller. If you liked the movie Seven with brad pitt and Morgan Freeman, then this movie is right up your alley. Check it out, a must own for any suspense fan.
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very cool serial killer film. If you like CSI and Law and Order, you might like this Sept. 10 2006
By Concerned One - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
This movie was a very big surprise to me when I discoverd it. Ben Kingsley, Aaron Eckhart, and Kerry Anne-Moss all have strong roles and characters in this film. Eckhart plays an FBI agent who got busted down in ranks and starts over in a desk job in the southwest US. He is assigned a case that quickley becomes more than just a missing persons/murder investigation. Through-out the film, Ben Kingsley and him develop a very unique bond that pulls us throug the movie and keeps us on the edge of our seats until the end. All thing are connected, pretty tight storyline. This is a psychological thriller that should please anyfan of movies like Identity, The Jacket, The Woodsman, and The Machinist. Also Fans of CSI and Law and Order may like this too. This film does not have the boundaries of TV ratings, so it is more gruesome. A must see.
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars STUNNING, INTELLIGENT, VISUALLY RICH THRILLER March 25 2005
By Robin Simmons - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Fact one: Since 1970, more than 90,000 persons have disappeared without a trace. Fact two: "Remote viewing," the ability to access information using the mind alone appears to be a real skill (and something the government has secretly funded)

Edmund Elias Merhige's SUSPECT ZERO (Paramount) is about a chastised FBI agent who may have innate "remote viewing" skills and a serial killer who definitely does.

Merhige's previous films, "Begotten" and "Shadow of the Vampire," are as different from each other as "Suspect Zero" is from either of them.

The tantalizing plot of this film was widely known before production began. But I won't spoil it for anyone who plans to see the DVD. Here's the set up: Aaron Eckhart is a troubled FBI agent relocated from Dallas to a southwestern desert town. A local killing with cultic elements connects with something from his past. Eckhart's former partner, an alienated Carrie-Anne Moss, gets involved. From the start, but known only to the audience, Ben Kingsley is revealed as a very twisted serial killer.

This visually rich, fascinating film is not about so much "who dunnit" but the more about the "why." It's not really a serial killer story and it's not a procedural crime drama about how the killer is caught. Something else is going on here. Director Merhige gives a clue in his cryptic statement: "You must address the underneath (the darkness), or it will devour your... It's the only way to heal the future from devouring itself."

To fully enjoy this unusual film, pay close attention to all the visual elements and then see it again with Merhige's commentary that explains his personal take on this story.

There's a stunning 4 part featurette: "What We See When We Close Our Eyes" and a startling Remote Viewing demonstration involving Merhige himself.
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Far from your typical serial killer film July 5 2005
By Daniel Jolley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
A serial killer killing serial killers? I don't know that that's a bad thing - especially since this guy specializes in serial killers the cops haven't even suspected yet. He's got a great little signature, too - a note featuring a zero with a slash through it, and he makes life imitate art by making his victims' eyes look like the one in the picture. Who do you get to play a madman like this? Gandhi, of course. Yes, Ben Kingsley, the man who played Mr. Nonviolent Protest himself, is the guy targeting serial killers here in Suspect Zero - and he plays the role exceedingly well, I might add.

Suspect Zero is, in my opinion, somewhat underrated. To me, it made perfect sense all along. It's a little confusing at first seeing conspicuously red-tinted images flashing buy out of nowhere, but it becomes clear pretty early on that the man being hunted is a remote viewer. Even if you aren't familiar with the concept of remote viewing, it's hard not to figure it out, so I'm not sure why some people seem to come away from this movie feeling totally lost. In a nutshell, remote viewing, which has absolutely been used by American intelligence and the FBI, allows the sensitive viewer to "see" things happening elsewhere, be they missile silos, enemy forces, or serial killers doing what serial killers do. Since Benjamin O'Ryan (Kingsley) can see the crimes, he can find the criminals. That's what he is doing now, taking out unidentified serial killers with just a little bit of vengeance. The big kahuna, though, is still out there - the killer he calls Suspect Zero. Suspect Zero has made a veritable cottage industry of abducting and killing kids in countless numbers all over the country. There's no discernible link between all of the missing kids, so know one even suspects that the world's foremost killer is out there operating with a free hand, nor would anyone believe that one man could claim literally hundreds of victims without getting caught. O'Ryan knows it, though - he has seen it.

The endgame, for whatever reason, involves Special Agent Mackelway (Aaron Eckhart), and O'Ryan is constantly faxing him cryptic clues and missing children's posters in an obvious attempt to draw the agent to him . Mackelway has something of a history, having taken the law into his own hands to some degree and, by so doing, letting a violent killer go free. As he gets deeper and deeper into this case, he begins having cryptic little visions and develops some kind of connection with the man he is searching for (troubling signs for an agent who's already had to go through an extensive psychological evaluation recently). It stands to reason that the whole gang will assemble at the very end -O'Ryan, Mackelway, and, of course, Suspect Zero himself - and that Mackelway will have to get there without much help from his disbelieving colleagues.

By and large, I think Suspect Zero is an excellent film. It's a thriller with a twist, an unusual story that plays out quite well. Unfortunately, it seems to take a shortcut or two on its way to a conclusion, leaving too much in the hands of fate or coincidence. It also has to go and give us two partners with a romantic history teaming up again - apparently, it's illegal to make a crime thriller without some kind of romantic subplot. Eckhart isn't bad, but he isn't completely convincing as he takes his character to the brink between insight and insanity. Besides his partner Fran (Carrie-Anne Moss), the rest of the characters barely emerge from the woodwork, especially Mackelways' supervisor (who doesn't even yell when he's upset with his rogue agent).

Despite a few minor faults, though, the unusual storyline of Suspect Zero and the excellent performance by Ben Kingsley carry the day, making this film stand out quite noticeably from others in the genre. Dark, gritty, and compelling, it's a film well worth watching, especially for those who harbor a fascination with serial killers.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Celuloid Syntax; Reality Release June 13 2006
By Linda G. Shelnutt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Two particular scenes stayed with me after viewing this movie through to the credits, both featuring Ben Kingsley. In the first scene, in a fundamental Christian church, tears were swimming in the actor's eyes as he endured the presence of exalted voices and happy children. In the second scene he was at his desk, enduring a final remote viewing, his left hand flapping rapidly on the table as his right hand sketched portraits of bulls-eyes to locations of horror.

It's nearly impossible for most of us to accept the reality of a world in which serial killers rob children from their homes, torture, and kill them. It's even more difficult to immerse onself, emotionally into the details of that reality. Most of us would, in good health, want to avoid coming close to experiencing what a child or his killer would. Emotional survival can waver on retaining a distance from heinous situations.

In view of that instinctive need to distance from the severest types of pain, this unique film would have an inherently difficult time capturing viewers. I believe this might be why this film haunts like a wisp of smoke, yet almost seems ineffective as a work of art. After the film clicks down as done, the natural response is to get it out of mind.

Yet, given my background in and curiosity about the art of film, I wanted to understand why I felt this movie was excellently done, yet I had connected into it only superficially as it moved across the screen.

The essence of this film is to get into the mind of the killer, and indirectly, of the victims. To me, the movie seemed to portray that it's almost more overwhelming to get into the mind of the killer than into the mind of the victim.

This movie pushed beyond other psychic "profiler" types of stories. Part of the beyond had to do with the subtly on-target acting performance of the trilogy of main stars. Who could doubt the performance intensity of Kingsley and Eckhart giving variations on themes of the deepest types of manic obsession. Some have disparaged a seeming lack of commitment of emotional investment to the part played by Moss. I do not doubt the validity and subtle brilliance of her presentation, though I can see why astute observers would form that opinion. To me she was true to the character and served as a buffer, a balance to the intensity of the male roles, and I believe she did this in a manner on line with realism as well as artistic finesse. The main word which continues coming to mind, for which I search for a variety of synonyms, is "subtle."

When I began working for the Multnomah County Sheriff's office in the 70's, serving in a swing shift as a crime prevention officer, one of my job tasks was to read every burglary, rape, murder, and kidnaping report which came into the office, usually at a rate of several per day. Needless to say the initiation into the details of that world of crime was shocking, and shifted me into an intensely uncomfortable sense of environment as I drove 40 minutes each night after 11 pm from the county borders into the inner city of Portland, OR, to my home in an old, nice neighborhood bordered closely on all sides by some of the highest crime areas of the city.

Each evening around 7 pm I read those reports, one-by-one, with each in turn settled in front of my eyes, flat on a grey metal desk, the pages composed of the slick copy paper used in the 70's. The duty police officers' hand-written details of the accounts varied in style, but were set into identical fill-in-the-blank formats. The narrative. The details. The narrative detail was the heart of the report, and it was clear that each detail had been hand written with clarity, a rigid focus taught at the police academy; and the subtle emotional attachment bled through the ink with a control which rendered crisp the line-edges of each letter.

It took a few months for me to begin functioning without a tight jitter to my emotions and constant observations of my environment, especially driving home at night.

I mention the above personal experience so that you will know that my observations of SUSPECT ZERO do not arrive from the eyes and soul of a person without a certain amount of awareness of the reality of the world of crime, the criminal mind, and valid, intensified attempts to achieve criminal justice.

Though married to a deputy sheriff for 8 years, my short career in police work, spanning only a few years through my late 20's, went well beyond what I've described above, but that is enough for the purposes of this review backing up my awareness of the nearly silent scream of the essence of this exquisite film, a silent plea brought to pitch in the tears growing to an ocean of pain in Kingsley's eyes in the church scene, and the nervous flapping of his hand on the desk, which grew steadily more rapid and intense as he sweat "blood" through his final viewing.

As a reviewer has clearly indicated, the director's (E. Elias Merhige) commentary at the conclusion of the movie exposes the not quite obvious, underlying perfection of the quiet, sheer, subtle skill which went into the production and finishing of this film. As stated above, I believe that the skill and perfection of this product is less obvious than many of its caliber, due partly at least to the natural and automatic emotional distancing necessary for viewers with remote's in hand.

Of course, beyond the artistic excellence, the plotting is brilliant, with its adherence to the title, SUSPECT ZERO; as is the play on seeing through a mirror darkly of a serial killer hunting and executing other serial killers, coming closer and closer to the most heinous of the genre.

Other parts of my background came into play in enhancing my ability to see the skeletal foundation of this film's essential effectiveness. In a 5 week, intense training course at Chicago's O'Hare airport as a flight attendant for United Airlines in 1968, trainees were privy to airline studies which gave amazing insight into the psychological gestalt of passengers at the culmination of a no-landing-gear, belly-landing, screeching metal on concrete, or other type of plane crash situation. Reportedly, most passengers go into a type of shock which removes them from their immediate situation. Reported comments reveal the extent of psychological removal, as many of them explore compassion felt for, "...those poor people on that crashed airplane." Passengers in the downed and damaged plane become unequivocally unaware that they are those "poor people."

The attendants are taught the necessity of screaming at and hitting some of the passengers to remove the shock barrier and initiate the duty of getting the passengers out of the plane to safety.

However, safety is relative if the crash has occurred in an ocean of shark infested waters, due to the fact that sharks are drawn to the concussion of the crash, as rapidly and voraciously as they are to blood seeping into the circular streams of rippling water.

Relating this information to the reality of serial killers repeatedly targeting children, the fact blessedly remains that the closer a person gets to the core of physically unavoidable insanity and torture, the more intensely implemented is the rescue of the psyche defense system, the graduated sense of "removal." This seemed to happen to my viewing of in this film, and as stated, I believe this is due to the film's hitting way closer to "home" than most movies exploring the remote viewing theme, rather than any lack in the plotting, directive, or acting technique.

Which brings me to another piece of my background which I believe may have elevated my analysis of the excellence of this movie. As a high school English teacher in Portland (prior to my short career in criminal justice), I taught a class called the Language of Film, or Filmic Statement. In this 5 week course, students wrote, designed, and implemented 3 minute films (Super 8 mm with separate but synchronized cassette tapes for sound track) and were allowed a class conclusion of a whole school assembly of an Academy Awards ceremony.

In that class the language of film was analyzed, basing from the choice and design of timing, distance, angle, and focus of each short shot (those new to the art are usually surprised that most camera shots are under 10 seconds long). Series of very short shots of varying angles, distances, and framing of subjects are used to direct and produce drama via various intricate techniques initiated from the eye of the camera. Quite a lot goes into the making of a film before and beyond directing actors to "face-the-good-side" to the camera and emote, in accordance to the scene and theme of the plot.

If you want to "see" these techniques in play, replay the two scenes I've mentioned and take time to observe how often short (few-seconds-in-length) shots cut, and change angle, direction, and frame-of-focus in a "simple" scene featuring the tearing eyes of Kingsley, or his hand flapping on the desk table. Then, you might replay again, to note the sequence of brevity or length of a series of shots, with longer shots beginning to build tension by becoming shorter and shorter, etc., with variations of that use of timing creating a filmic rhythm rarely noticed under or beyond the emotion created by its dramatic effect.

A third scene has been etched into my mind from SUSPECT ZERO. It was the wrestling struggle between Suspect Zero and Eckhart. The fight was subtly effective in being the opposite of what might have been expected. It was not an intensely drawn out battle of kicks, slugs, and slams, but a quiet wrestling, with the muscle-and-bone-bodies of good and evil prone on the ground, entwined like worms or snakes, with the killer subdued rapidly, almost easily, like he had nothing of substance, not even a force of evil.

For me, the key of a movie's success is how a drama feels during viewing, and if/how it lingers after the credits have rolled down screen, after the DVD player is abandoned, and reality again becomes the focus as it re-opens its ongoing scenes to the next Walkabout of unknown design.

According to the very well done reviews here, the wide screen version of the DVD includes a commentary by the director, .... The used VHS version I saw did not have that commentary.

With Respect for Healing Value of Art,
Linda G. Shelnutt
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback