Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Sweet Cakes, Long Journey [Paperback]

Marie Wong

Price: CDN$ 30.00 & FREE Shipping. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Save Up to 90% on Textbooks
Hit the books in Amazon.ca's Textbook Store and save up to 90% on used textbooks and 35% on new textbooks. Learn more.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

May 1 2004 Scott and Laurie Oki Series in Asian American Studies
Around the turn of the twentieth century, and for decades thereafter, Oregon had the second largest Chinese population in the United States. In terms of geographical coverage, Portland's two Chinatowns (one an urban area of brick commercial structures, one a vegetable-gardening community of shanty dwellings) were the largest in all of North America. Marie Rose Wong chronicles the history of Portland's Chinatowns from their early beginnings in the 1850s until the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in the 1940s, drawing on exhaustive primary material from the National Archives, including more than six thousand individual immigration files, census manuscripts, letters, and newspaper accounts, She examines both the enforcement of Exclusion Laws in the United States and the means by which Chinese immigrants gained illegal entry into the country. The spatial and ethnic makeup of the combined 'Old Chinatown' afforded much more contact and accommodation between Chinese and non-Chinese people than is usually assumed to have occurred in Portland, and than actually may have occurred elsewhere. "Sweet Cakes, Long Journey" explores the contributions that Oregon's leaders and laws had on the development of Chinese American community life, and the role that the early Chinese immigrants played in determining their own community destiny and the development of their Chinatown in its urban form and vernacular architectural expression. "Sweet Cakes, Long Journey" is an original and notable addition to the history of Portland and to the field of Asian American studies.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: University of Washington Press (May 1 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0295983833
  • ISBN-13: 978-0295983837
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 15 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g

Product Description

About the Author

HISPACNW

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good! Jan. 14 2005
By Lorn Richey - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This has got to be the most in-depth book on the creation of a Chinatown (or any neighborhood for that matter) in the United States. Anyone interested in community development, the Asian American experience, or Chinese immigration to the U.S. should read this book. Very good black and white photos, maps, and reproductions of old documents.
5.0 out of 5 stars what I was looking for July 11 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
lotsa info
4.0 out of 5 stars Very factual. Could use a different title. July 4 2014
By Lily - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I was hoping there would be more anecdotes to this book given the title. Although Marie Wong does include plenty of interesting political occurrences between communities, the back to back litigations begin to become repetitive. Still fun to indulge in history, nonetheless.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback