Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

A Sweet, Separate Intimacy: Women Writers of the American Frontier, 1800-1922 [Paperback]

Susan Cummins Miller
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $29.64  
Paperback, April 2000 --  
Save Up to 90% on Textbooks
Hit the books in Amazon.ca's Textbook Store and save up to 90% on used textbooks and 35% on new textbooks. Learn more.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

April 2000
In this book are bits and pieces of dreams, lives, experiences, and vistas, like squares cut from old cloth and assembled into a crazy quilt of writing styles and forms. The patchwork design mirrors both the complexity of the chroniclers and the stark lines and angles of the American frontier. —Susan Cummins Miller, from the introduction In this anthology of thirty-four writers who published during the settlement years of the American frontier, Miller assembles nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and occasional writings from women of Anglo, Chinese, Hispanic, and Native American ethnicity. Variously addressing such themes as isolation, drudgery, friendship, mourning, and even mysticism, these writers offer up a different frontier, one that focuses on women’s experiences as much as men’s. In brief biographical and historical introductions to each writer, Miller shares insights and context as engaging as the selections themselves.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Product Details


Product Description

From Library Journal

The 34 writers included in this impressive anthology originally published their fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and occasional writings during the settlement years of the American frontier. All of the women were professional authors at a time when women generally had difficulty finding publishers. Their abilities reinforced their physical isolation yet offered them outlets not available to most women and men. Miller, who lives in Arizona and has degrees in history, anthropology, and geology, has done a particularly fine job of finding voices that aren't often represented in frontier literatureDwomen of Native American, Hispanic, Chinese, and Anglo ethnicity are included. Each selection is preceded by a brief biographical and historical reference establishing context. Miller's admiration and respect for each author is evident. Recommended for women's studies, American studies, and frontier literature collections in academic and public libraries.DPam Kingsbury, Florence, AL
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"This book deserves a place alongside other compilations of women's experience of the early days out West." --Cindy Bellinger, Enchantment Sept. 2008 "This useful and accessible collection has great appeal for general readers with an interest in western, nineteenth-century, or women's history. Moreover, college and high school instructors will find it a welcome source and textbook." --Jennifer L. Jenkins, Journal of Arizona History j "Not simply paeans to the West, the selections examine substantive social, political, and racial themes and explore issues of identity, marriage, and autonomy." --J. K. Weinstein, Choice "The frontier and American women are intertwined in the collected pieces through the issues of race, the clash of indigenous and invading or intermingling cultures. The feminine voice is heard throughout--voices rich in detail and less impaired by territorial imperative." --David B. Broad, Journal of the West "... A testament to the adage 'you can't keep a good book down.'" -- The Journal of Arizona History, Vol. 49, No. 3, Autumn 2008 "The editor posses a sure grasp of the sorts of topics and themes that are likely to interest contemporary readers with a literary bent...A lot of the frontier women's fiction reprinted in Miller's compendium is fetching and not easy to find... Nor will the reader want to overlook Sharlot Mabridth Halls' (d. 1913) "The Fruit of the Yucca Tree" (1905), a thematic amalgam of Bret Harte's early Western scenes and Jack London's droll forebodings. Enchanting stories like these not only indicate the richness of Miller's selections, but offer readers plenty of food for thought about the imaginative life of their frontier authors."-- Chiron Review, No. 85, Winter 2008 --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
MY TIES TO THE women in this volume run deep. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read For All Women & Historians July 14 2002
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Susan Cummins Miller, a very gifted editor and writer, has scored a hit with this one! It should be read by every woman, young and old, desiring a woman's insight of the events of the West during its formative years. The book gives the reader a woman's perspective as to the hardships suffered along with moments of humor and the joys of discovery and exploration through essays, travelogues, poetry and letters. The editor has blended well a group of women writers who lived this age of discovery and settlement. Almost all the cultures in the West during the period are presented with their particular view of the events as they lived them. It is a unique collection and I wish I had read this book in college. It certainly would have broadened my horizons and complimented the materials presented in my history and literature classes. Hey, professors! You need to add this book to your must read lists. And, to the author, many thanks for finding a unique niche that had been missed and filling it with a great group of women writers, broadening our historical and literary minds and giving us one great book that can be enjoyed many times over. It will hold a sacred place on my bookshelf.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Oprah should read THIS one April 14 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
For the first time I really understand the role played by WOMEN in settling the West. This collection of writings by women of all cultures took me to that time and let me feel the joy, loneliness, laughter, exhaustion and fulfillment of settling a new country. It also let me see the life of the American Indian through the eyes of women for the first time. Excellent read.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read For All Women & Historians July 14 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Susan Cummins Miller, a very gifted editor and writer, has scored a hit with this one! It should be read by every woman, young and old, desiring a woman's insight of the events of the West during its formative years. The book gives the reader a woman's perspective as to the hardships suffered along with moments of humor and the joys of discovery and exploration through essays, travelogues, poetry and letters. The editor has blended well a group of women writers who lived this age of discovery and settlement. Almost all the cultures in the West during the period are presented with their particular view of the events as they lived them. It is a unique collection and I wish I had read this book in college. It certainly would have broadened my horizons and complimented the materials presented in my history and literature classes. Hey, professors! You need to add this book to your must read lists. And, to the author, many thanks for finding a unique niche that had been missed and filling it with a great group of women writers, broadening our historical and literary minds and giving us one great book that can be enjoyed many times over. It will hold a sacred place on my bookshelf.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oprah should read THIS one April 14 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
For the first time I really understand the role played by WOMEN in settling the West. This collection of writings by women of all cultures took me to that time and let me feel the joy, loneliness, laughter, exhaustion and fulfillment of settling a new country. It also let me see the life of the American Indian through the eyes of women for the first time. Excellent read.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful! July 20 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
From the moment I heard about the premise of this book I waited with anticipation. What joy that it fulfilled everything I expected. Susan is a gifted writer and brings these women's words to life. The book made me desperate for more, both in depth and scope. As easy to take as a novel, it is a history lesson - should I say HERstory - and then some. Superb work.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Remarkable Collection Nov. 3 2008
By Story Circle Book Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
With this outstanding collection, editor Susan Cummins Miller has given us a remarkable gift: the works of thirty-four women writers who lived from the early days of the American frontier until midway through the twentieth century. Published in 2000 and commendably reissued by Texas Tech University Press in its full, original length, A Sweet, Separate Intimacy makes a vitally important contribution to our understanding and appreciation of the lives and work of women writers who would otherwise continue in the obscurity into which many of them have fallen.

With the exception of a few such notable writers as Willa Cather, Mary Austin, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, the women represented here have not been read since their original publication. The search that turned them up was a "treasure hunt," Miller says, as she followed trails of footnotes and buried references to bring us reports from the wild places of the frontier, written by women who traveled the difficult roads sometimes alone, sometimes in company, but always in partnership with their pens. They wrote letters home, or wrote essays for publication, or wrote after the fact, but they wrote. And wrote, and--luckily for us--kept on writing.

Four of the writers in the anthology are Native Americans. More than half wrote before the years of the Civil War. One, Elizabeth Custer, wrote to immortalize her husband; another, Frances Gage, immortalized Sojourner Truth. The intrepid Isabella Bird wrote with her heart in her mouth about her climb up Long's Peak (what in the world was she wearing?). Caroline Kirkland wrote with her tongue in her cheek about the enormous lot of gear that was packed into the wagon that carried her and her family into the wilderness, "which we then, in our greenness, considered indispensable. We have since learned better."

All of these women writers had an appreciative eye for domestic detail. We read about adobe houses in Los Angeles (Helen Jackson) and the tents and earthen lodges of the Western tribes (Alice Fletcher), about food and gardens and husbands and children and births and illness and deaths, about women's hopes and dreams and disillusionments. Men don't record these homely details in their stories--they can't. Women do, at least, these women have, and it's a good thing, too, for how else can we know about the lives of real people as they heroically settled down to carving homes and schools and towns out of a wild land? I must personally confess to a happy moment of recognition when I turned a page and found a long poem by Rose Hartwick Thorpe, "Curfew Shall Not Ring Tonight," which I memorized as a girl for my own personal pleasure, because I loved the poem's story and its strong, ringing lines.

Miller has also given us brief but valuable biographical essays about each writer, placing her in the context of her time and giving us a sense of the shape of her literary work. These, together with sources, a full bibliography, and the rich treasures of the writings themselves, make for an extraordinarily powerful and unique volume. Many, many thanks to Susan Cummins Miller for an remarkable anthology that belongs in every collection of women's and Western literature.

by Susan Wittig Albert
for Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women
4.0 out of 5 stars A Sweet, Separate Intimacy Sept. 18 2011
By Cindy Bellinger - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This fine anthology assembles fiction, non-fiction and poetry from women of the early West. The 34 writers showcase a broad range of interests, weaving in political, social and racial themes. We learn how women raised in the high-brow East came to love the rugged desert despite bouts of isolation and sheer fear of the wilderness. Many took to riding horses which opened their heart to the land. Miller writes that searching for the entries was a "treasure hunt" and as she followed obscure leads, scouring letters, diaries, published novels, essays and poetry. Her introduction to each author helps place them in a time and place.

Some of the writing is `old fashioned' with flowery descriptions and archaic syntax. Other selections are clean with a vibrancy that brings the telling into the present and makes for a delightful read. All of the women were well known to their contemporaries; their reports from the West were "a way of distilling on paper the stranger-in-a-strange-land experience...." Some of the women wrote to supplement their family's income. This book deserves a place alongside other compilations of women's experience of the early days out West.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback