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Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard + Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
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Product Details

  • Audio CD: 6 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (Feb. 16 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0739376969
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739376966
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.8 x 15 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #165,779 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

 “Witty and instructive…The Heath brothers think that the sciences of human behavior can provide us with tools for making changes in our lives—tools that are more effective than 'willpower,' 'leadership' and other easier-said-than-done solutions. …For any effort at change to succeed, the Heaths argue, you have to 'shape the path.' With Switch they have shaped a path that leads in a most promising direction.”
--The Wall Street Journal

“’Your brain is not of one mind,’" say the brothers Heath, co-authors of the bestseller Made to Stick. Using the terminology of University of Virginia psychologist Jonathan Haidt, the Heaths designate the emotional side of the mind as the Elephant and the rational side as the Rider…Switch is crammed with stories…covering a number of fields to drive home the importance of using the strengths of both the Rider and the Elephant to make change happen. This could be a valuable read for the would-be change-makers of the Obama administration.”
--Fort Worth Star-Telegram

“Whether you're a manager, a parent or a civic leader, getting people to change can be tricky business. In Switch, brothers Chip and Dan Heath--authors of the best-selling Made to Stick--survey efforts to shape human behavior in search of what works…Even when change isn't easy, it's often worth making.”
--Time

“Dan and Chip Heath have done it again…Any leader looking to create change in his organization need not look beyond this little book. It is packed with examples and hands-on tools that will get you moving right away. And it is really a fun read.”
--BusinessWeek.com

“No one likes change. Trouble is, of course, that everyone probably needs at least some of it. Here, the authors of the bestselling Made to Stick return with a book that looks at all aspects of change in human lives, from dieting to spending, from corporations to governments...a readable, entertaining and thought-provoking book. “
--Smartmoney.com




From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Chip Heath is the Thrive Foundation for Youth Professor of Organizational Behaviour at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. Dan Heath is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at Duke University. Together, they are the authors of the national bestseller Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. They write a regular column in Fast Company magazine, and have appeared on Today, NPR's Morning Edition, MSNBC, CNBC, and have been featured in TimePeople and US News and World Report.

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Most helpful customer reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 16 2010
Format: Hardcover
Chip and Dan Heath have once again summoned a lively writing style to present a series of compelling insights that make this book even more interesting as well as more valuable than its predecessor, Made to Stick. As they explain in the first chapter, "In this book, we argue that successful changes share a common pattern. They require the leader of change to do three things at once: To change someone's behavior, you've got to change that person's situation...[to cope with the fact that change] is hard because people wear themselves out. And that's the second surprise about change: What looks like laziness is often exhaustion...If you want people to change, you must provide crystal clear direction [because what] looks like resistance is often a lack of clarity." Throughout, the Heaths work within a narrative, best viewed as a "three-part framework," as they provide countless real-world (as opposed to hypothetical or theoretical] examples and - to their great credit - also provide a context or frame-of-reference for each.

Moreover, the Heaths invoke a few extended metaphors. The most important of these are the Rider (i.e. our rational side), the Elephant, (i.e. our emotional and instinctive side) and the Path (i.e. the surrounding environment in which change initiatives will be conducted). The challenge is to direct the Rider, motivate the Elephant, and shape the Path to make change more likely, "no matter what's happening with the Rider and Elephant...If you can do all three at once, dramatic change can happen even if you don't have lots of power or resources behind you."

Donald Berwick offers an excellent case in point.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 8 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book examines the two independent systems that compete for control in our head all the time: the rational vs. emotional. More importantly, there are plenty of success stories cited that exemplify changes with critical impact for both individuals and organizations. This is not a typical how-to book; rather it is compilation of surprisingly innovative thought processes that serve as guiding examples to be lauded. I have already incorporated several of its points and have seen a significant change and improvement in my own working habits. It has also served to bring a new perspective to organizations that are "stuck" in their ways without having to resort to radical overhauls. Change can be disarmingly simple; it all starts with an open mind.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rodge TOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 31 2011
Format: Hardcover
Perhaps the most helpful way to think of this book would be a Malcolm Gladwell type collection of anecdotes along with an added component to help you think about making application. In other words this is a self-help book that might actually be helpful. The book looks at motivation, keeping it simple enough that everybody can follow along. The 3 components involved are referred to as "Rider", "Elephant" and "Path". If you actually read this book you'll have no problem picking up on what they mean by each term. This book is aimed at the general public, not CEOs, so they focus on ways of making change happen that can work even if you aren't in a position to give orders - even if the people you are trying to motivate aren't accountable to you. You'll learn about common pitfalls like "Fundamental attribution error" and the "fixed mindset" that can undermine change. And lots of other cool and useful stuff. No silly promises are made about making everything wonderful forever - this is a book firmly grounded in the real world. Highly recommended, in other words.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Bitsphere on Feb. 16 2010
Format: Hardcover
Based on the authors'' previous book, Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, I enthusiastically searched for an advance copy to read before the release date. The effort was worth it, I recommend Switch!

Professionally, I design health and wellness products and services, so influencing behaviour and helping people change is relevant for me. This is a book about making change on a personal and organizational level -' it''s an accessible read on psychodynamics designed around a set of simple maxims to help you understand and influence change in everyday life.

There is some similarity with Nudge, by Thaler and Sunstein, another excellent book focused on influencing behavior. Nudge is an academic treatment of decision making, focused on the cognitive process. Nudge beats you over the head with evidence (it''s long) and it''s less actionable than Switch, however, I still recommend Nudge for those who are serious about design, marketing, business, public policy, education etc. Read it after Switch' they offer different things.

In Switch, the Heath brothers illustrate the dichotomy between the thinking rational self and the feeling instinctive self and how they can work together to bring about change. They also focus on our social environment 'how one''s context can influence behavior.

Simply and effectively, the authors' use an analogy to explain how to change behavior: Direct the Rider, motivate the Elephant, and shape the Path.
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