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01 Sword And Sorceress Mass Market Paperback – Jan 1 1981


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: DAW; First Edition edition (Jan. 1 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879979283
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879979287
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 10.4 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #861,791 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By A Customer on April 1 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Sword and Sorceress is the original. This book has given rise to a series spanning 15 other books, and set the precedent for all future books in the series. All the stories in S&S I are about stong female characters, but the stories are diverse. Some are written by men, some by women. Some have only a female protagonist, others have male and female protagonists working together. The protagonist's talents range from shapeshifting, to magic, to swordsmanship. Or should I say swordswomanship? All in all, Bradley has put together a collection of stories that will entertain every fantasy reader. I was especially pleased to find so much variety and quality in one anthology. I like Bradley's novels, and as an editor she is no less disapointing. I highly reccommend any books in the S&S series!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Strong Stories about Strong Women Protagonists June 13 2002
By Shanshad - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Women read fantasy too. Beloved author/editor Marion Zimmer Bradley created this anthology in 1984 to address just that issue. At a time when women's fantasy was just beginning to make its mark, MZB created an anthology to define the emerging female protagonist. In her introduction, MZB makes it clear that she wanted to avoid the stereotypical Amazon-type heroine who ultimately gave up her freedom to win love. She didn't simply want recreate the old cliché turned upside down-where the men are subservient to women. She wanted stories that gave women new myths to identify with, powerful stories that could be worth consideration by the men and women who read them. This collection is not your average "feminist literature", these are stories that feature warriors, magic-users, healers and thieves-the women of fantasy, the kind of women to give a new generation of fantasy readers characters to see parts of themselves in, and ultimately make readers think.
MZB must have been onto a good thing. In the nearly twenty years since the first publication, there have been 19 Sword and Sorceress anthologies to date. Having read all of these anthologies, I can honestly say that this remains one of the best. The originality of the stories, the quality, the variety; all of these elements make this particular shine out from the group. Out of the fifteen stories, four are written by men, including well-recognized authors Glen Cook and Charles de Lint. MZB prefaces each story with a short blurb about the author and a few comments of her own. These paragraphs, along with her introduction, enable readers to catch the glimpse of MZB's personality and some insight into why she chose the particular stories she's included in this anthology. It becomes clear that each story was selected with care, polished and set in place to augment this anthology. There are no "filler" stories here.
Readers skimming the contents will quickly recognize quite a few of the author names; Glen Cook, Emma Bull, Charles de Lint, Jennifer Roberson and Diana Paxson to name a few. For Emma Bull and some of the other authors listed, this is their first sale. That is an additional bit of delight in these earliest Sword and Sorceress anthologies. So many writers made their first sale, or were just beginning their careers at the time. As to the stories themselves, they are as varied as the authors. For sword and sorcery duos, "The Garnet and the Glory" by Phyllis Ann Karr and "The Rending Dark" by Emma Bull are good examples. For darker, emotionally charged reads, try "Severed Heads" by Glen Cook, or "Sword of Yraine" by Diana L. Paxson. On the lighter side there is "Taking Heart" by Stephen L. Burns, "Daton and the Dead Things" by Michael Ward, and the finale of the anthology, a short-short story by Dorothy J. Heydt, "Things Come in Threes". My particular favorite story-although I admit it is hard to choose just one, all of them have had a powerful impact-is "With Four Lean Hounds" by Pat Murphy. This is a beautiful, fairy-tale-esque story that is as powerful in its message as in its unfolding adventure.
Any reader who loves good fantasy, particularly short stories will likely enjoy this. Women readers especially-but in no way exclusively will appreciate the chance to read about women as protagonists of the epic fantasy story. When this was first published, there were much fewer female fantasy writers and stories available. This has changed dramatically over the intervening two decades. Despite that, it does not diminish the quality of this first anthology-and the stories remain as strong today as they were when published. On a side note-these are all fantasy reads-MZB as a rule does not include science fiction stories in any of her anthologies, although the right story can make her break the rule just a bit. If you can find this anthology, buy it-read it and treasure it.
Happy Reading!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The book that started the series! April 1 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Sword and Sorceress is the original. This book has given rise to a series spanning 15 other books, and set the precedent for all future books in the series. All the stories in S&S I are about stong female characters, but the stories are diverse. Some are written by men, some by women. Some have only a female protagonist, others have male and female protagonists working together. The protagonist's talents range from shapeshifting, to magic, to swordsmanship. Or should I say swordswomanship? All in all, Bradley has put together a collection of stories that will entertain every fantasy reader. I was especially pleased to find so much variety and quality in one anthology. I like Bradley's novels, and as an editor she is no less disapointing. I highly reccommend any books in the S&S series!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Fem Lit! May 18 2007
By M. Rhodes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a great book filled with short stories showing the weakness and strengths of women. These women are not your usual women - some are soldiers, some sorceress and others just plain ole women who are thrown into an extraordinary situation and prevail, or do they? They don't all end with the typical fairy tale ending. This book is the first in a series of 21 books. My favorite story is the Thorn and Frostflower involving travel to other worlds by Phyllis Karr.
A classic anthology series begins Feb. 14 2009
By Chrijeff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Marion Zimmer Bradley, known by her many fans as MZB, was not only the author of the highly successful and popular Darkover sf series (and several other, shorter ones), but a noted editor of anthologies and, briefly, her own magazine. The Sword & Sorceress collections were probably her best-known ventures in this field: there were a total of 21 of them, brought out every year from 1984 (this one) to 2004 (five years after her death). Her fiercely feminist stance is such that I often wonder why her best-known created world was notable for its sexism!

Of the 15 stories here collected, I found 10 personably enjoyable enough to mark for rereading, including Phyllis Ann Karr's "The Garnet and the Glory" (a vaguely Fritz Leiber-esque tale featuring Karr's female warrior Thorn and sorceress Frostflower), Glen Cook's "Severed Heads" (in which a desert girl, assaulted by a mysterious rider, bears his son and then rides out in pursuit of him after he returns to steal the child away from her), "The Rending Dark" by Emma Bull (the first professional sale by the later author of War for the Oaks: A Novel), "Gimmile's Songs" by Charles Saunders (a Dahomean Amazon discovers romance and adventure in a very fantastical way), "The Valley of the Troll" by Charles deLint (a classic s&s tale by an author who later became best known for his "Newford" urban fantasies), "Blood of Sorcery" by Jennifer Roberson (a Cheysuli story set in the Universe of Shapechangers (Chronicles of the Cheysuli, Bk. 1) and its sequels), "With Four Lean Hounds" by Pat Murphy (a clearly fairy-tale-derived story of a young thief who discovers her roots and sets herself against her mother), Diana L. Paxson's "Sword of Yraine" (an introductory story featuring the author's best-known character, warrior-princess Shanna), Michael Ward's humorous tall tale "Daton and the Dead Things" (in which a nameless female warrior finds herself re-enacting Odysseus's encounter with the Cyclops), and Robin W. Bailey's "Child of Orcus" (based upon the historical fact that the Emperor Nero put female gladiators into the arena). Like much short fiction, these often have the weakness that space won't permit much exposition, and you may find yourself wanting to know more about the characters or their world. But they're all well done, with plenty of action and enough "strong women" to please anyone. This first in the series definitely promised well for those that followed it.
Amazing collection of impressive women Aug. 10 2010
By Matthew McCann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am so impressed by the stories collected in this first book. I love short sotries and the variety here runs the gamut from historic fantasy, cultural fantasy, horror, whimsical, romantic, adventure fantasy, and epic. I loved each story and struggle to select just one as my favorite.

The best feature about this book is the characterization of the heroines. Afterall, this is why MZB compiled the collection. I love that she found the virtues we all admire in our heroes in these characters. They are courageous, humble, witty, resourceful, vulnerable, conflicted, and admirable each in their own right.

I would love to find this volume in hardcover, alas it has not been published that way. Its a shame too, I could keep this book proudly on display.

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