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Symphonies Nos. 2 & 3


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Product Details

  • Composer: Lyatoshinsky
  • Audio CD (Sept. 5 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: MP
  • ASIN: B00000460K
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #315,985 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Lento Tenebroso E Con Maesta - Allegro Deciso Ed Impetuoso
2. Lento E Tranquillo (Alla Ballata)
3. Andante - Allegro Precipitato
4. Andante Maestoso - Allegro Impetuoso
5. Andante Con Moto
6. Allegro Feroce
7. Allegro Risoluto

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Boris Nikoleyevich Liatoshynsky (1895-1968) is generally regarded as the father of contemporary Ukrainian music. Whereas his professor of composition, Reinhold Gliere, was influential upon him & others, Liatoshynsky had a greater influence upon contemporary Ukrainian composer, such as Stankovich, Silvestrov, Artyomov, & Baley. As composer, as well as professor & director of the Kiev Conservatory, Ukraine finally had its musical voice and its musical identity. Whereas Carl Nielsen was the voice of modern Danish music, Sibelius of Finland, Szymanowski of Poland, Kodaly & Bartok of Hungary, Enesco of Romania, Bax, Walton, & Vaughan-Williams of Great Britain, so was Liatoshynsky of the Ukraine.
The 2nd symphony was completed by 1936 & revised by 1940 (revision forced upon the composer by the Soviet regime). In many ways, the symphony represents a turning point in Liatoshynsky's idiom & ways of communication. Whereas the 1st symphony shows considerable influences of both Gliere & Scriabin, the 2nd symphony noticeably rid itself of such influences (although Gliere was still on the composer's mind to an extent)& what we have is Liatoshynsky in his own, identifiable language. His sense of communicative urgency & daringnes are apparent in this symphony as well in symphonies nos. 1 & 3: they somewhat disappeared in his 4th & 5th symphonies. The second symphony is an outcry of repression placed upon him & other composers during the Age of Stalin, (like Popov's 1st & Shostakovich 4th symphonies, though lesser in extent). I am willing to believe that the 1st version of Liatoshynsky's symphony no. 2 is more darker, angered, & honest in tone than the "forced" 2nd version.
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Format: Audio CD
I just finished listening to Lyatoshynsky music for the first time with this CD. What a real surprise it was! I thoroughly enjoyed it. Lyatoshynsky sounds like early soviet era composers in that his music is energetic, colorful, and with faery tale/folk elements. The music has a real drive and was very pleasurable listening to it. I only wish he wrote more and that I "discovered" him earlier. To my ear, if one likes the color and volume of Gliere, the energy of Scriabin, the originality of Prokofiev, then they will surely enjoy this composer as well.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Great performances of the music of Ukraine's Father of its modern music. April 9 1999
By David Anthony Hollingsworth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Boris Nikoleyevich Lyatoshynsky (1895-1968) is generally regarded as the father of contemporary Ukrainian music and an immense influence on succeeding generation of composers such as Stankovich, Silvestrov, Artyomov, & Baley: a honor shared with Carl Nielsen of Denmark, Sibelius (Finland), Szymanowski (Poland), Kodaly & Bartok (Hungary) and Enesco (Romania).

The Second symphony was completed in 1936 and forcefully revised by the officials in 1940. In many ways, the symphony represents a turning point in Lyatoshynsky's idiom and communication. While the First Symphony shows considerable influences of both Gliere and Scriabin, this symphony, for the most part, rid itself of such influences for the sake of a more independent voice (although Gliere still props up, but less so). It is also a rather bold musical testament against the oppressive weight of Soviet officialdom (think of its contemporary works such as, for instances, Popov's First Symphony and Shostakovich's Fourth). I am willing to bet that the first version of the symphony is a good deal more bolder and uninhibited than the "forced" second version. Nevertheless, this work is regarded as highly as the symphonies of Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and Myaskovsky.

The Third Symphony of 1951, likewise revised under orders of the Soviet censors in 1954, is the most popular of Lyatoshynsky's five symphonies, and with good reasons. It is Lyatoshynsky's more mature symphony and the one that is has a great deal more of integration and organic growth of its ideas. It also represents more compellingly the mood of Ukrainian people: from anguish and despair in the first movement, to profound poetic beauty in the second, to some of the playfulness in the third, and finally the to hard earned victory in the finale. The sort of "from darkness to light" idea of the work is anything but original (Shostakovich "Lennigrad?"), but the expression behind it is as genuine as it comes. The composer used the epigraph "Peace Will Defeat War" in the last movement of the original score, until he was forced to remove it. A terrible misfortune, since the epigraph very likely would have meant "Free living, free thinking minds will defeat repression." Listening to the finale, there is nothing wrong to assume that overcoming repression was on the composer's mind when composing this masterpiece. Does this reminds you of Kodaly's Psalmus Hungaricus?

The performances of the Ukrainian State Symphony under Theodore Kuchar are simply superb and artful. The Marco Polo recording is quite superb, if having a bit too much bass. Regardless, this benchmark recording will be the one against which all future recordings will be measured. I hope that the same team will record Lyatoshynsky's other works, such as, say, Slavonic Concerto, Suite "Romeo and Juliet", operas "The Golden Ring" and "Schchors." That said, this Marco Polo series will do very nicely for the time being.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
What a surprise! June 20 2000
By Karim Elmahmoudi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I just finished listening to Lyatoshynsky music for the first time with this CD. What a real surprise it was! I thoroughly enjoyed it. Lyatoshynsky sounds like early soviet era composers in that his music is energetic, colorful, and with faery tale/folk elements. The music has a real drive and was very pleasurable listening to it. I only wish he wrote more and that I "discovered" him earlier. To my ear, if one likes the color and volume of Gliere, the energy of Scriabin, the originality of Prokofiev, then they will surely enjoy this composer as well.

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