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Symphony 3 / Symphony 5 [Import]

Brahms , Schubert , Reiner , Cso Audio CD

Price: CDN$ 25.95
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Product Details


1. Sym No.3, Op.90 in F: Allegro Con Brio
2. Sym No.3, Op.90 in F: Andante
3. Sym No.3, Op.90 in F: Poco Allegretto
4. Sym No.3, Op.90 in F: Allegro
5. Sym No.5, D.485 in B flat: Allegro
6. Sym No.5, D.485 in B flat: Andante Con Moto
7. Sym No.5, D.485 in B flat: Menuetto: Allegro Molto
8. Sym No.5, D.485 in B flat:Allegro Vivace
9. The Hebrides (Fingal's Cave), Op.26/Die Hebriden (Fingals-Hohle)/Les Hebrides (La Grotte de Fingal)

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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars great Brahms, partially rushed Schubert Aug. 10 2012
By Kirk List - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
On the evidence of the Reiner Brahms that I have heard, especially the symphonies #3 and 4 and piano concerti
#1 (with Rubinstein) and 2 (with Gilels-I have not heard the violin concerto with Heifetz or the second piano concerto with Cliburn), Reiner was a great Brahms conductor. This #3 contains tough, tight, and propulsive outer movements, especially the fourth movement which sounds akin to the whirlwind finale of its earlier neighbor, the symphony #2. The second movement is tender, graceful, and unrushed, and the third movement
is intense and quite romantic-filled, I think with weariness, sadness and anger. It is a dramatic performance. I do miss some of the monumentality of Eugen Jochum's BPO first movement, but this Reiner #3 is also superb.

Unlike his terrific Unfinished (see my review), I am less thrilled by Reiner's #5. The middle movements are more relaxed-quite fine, but I find the outer movements too quick. However, I find this true of other versions, including those by conductors whose other Schubert I enjoy , such as Sawallisch and Haitink (see my reviews), Abbado and Marriner. So it may be more my problem than theirs.

Peers: Brahms 3- Jochum/BPO, Szell/Cleveland and RCOA, Klemperer/EMI, Bohm/VPO (1953)
Schubert 5: Bohm/BPO and VPO; Klemperer/EMI; Jochum/BRSO (DG)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars **** 1/2 Classic Reiner for brilliant playing, but a little restrained in the Brahms Third Nov. 24 2013
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I don't know how this superb CD missed out being featured in various reissues of Reiner's catalog, almost the whole of which now appears in RCA's Living Stereo series. The simple division between the Toscanini and Furtwangler style of conducting doesn't apply to Reine. when the lead reviewer says that this Brahms Third is "tough, tight, and propulsive" in the outer movements, he must be having Toscanini deja vu. In reality Reiner is rather relaxed, but that's just the beginning. He was an objective, even impersonal conductor, but one who almost never sounds efficient the way Szell often does.

Here the texture of Brahms's orchestration isn't employed for grandeur, in the style of Karajan and Rattle. Instead, there's a kind of clarity and directness that I find "American." Szell achieved the same sound, generally speaking, in his Brahms, and I had forgotten how impressively both conductors (who were Hungarian and Jewish, like Solti - what an amazing crop of great conductors one small country produced!) shaped the virtuosity of their orchestras. As an interpretation, Reiner's Brahms Third is deceptively plain, but that's also true of his great Tchaikovsky "Pathetique." He could make the most romantic score "speak" without indulging in off-the-shelf Romantic gestures.

In most Brahms Thirds, the outer movements are the main attraction, thanks to the gentle sameness of the two inner movements and their bittersweet mood. Here they are the highlight of the performance, moving forward at a natural pace and yet feeling so poignant without underlining the mood. Reiner understates the outer movements, which move quickly and deftly. This restraint may put off some listeners - it's most evident in the finale - but as an offsetting grace there is the quiet virtuosity and eprfect balance of the CSO's playing.

Reiner's Schubert fifth also falls into the objective class, but the pacing and playing are so sparkling that one is reminded of his Rossini overtures CD, a classic recording even though it substitutes virtuosity for wit. In his way Reiner was capable of giving us high spirits. This dashing reading isn't driven or tense, so it's not Toscanini redux. For a warmer, more genial Schubert Fifth, I'd pick Bruno Walter on Sony, without accusing Reiner of being cold. The only disappointment on the program (essentially a complete old-fashioned concert) is probably the Mendelssohn "Hebrides" Overture, which sounds a bit clinical once you've heard Furtwangler.

As for the sonics, the Brahms (1957) and Schubert (1960) are natural and detailed, but not in the demonstration-quality mode (who says "You have to come hear this killer Schubert fifth on my system" anyway?), while the Mendelssohn (1956) is a bit coarse.

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