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Symphony 4 Import


Price: CDN$ 58.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
2 new from CDN$ 44.58 3 used from CDN$ 32.16

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
The Haunting May 18 2011
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
This CD should be titled: Darkness over Europe. Asking the Berlin Philharmonic to record these death-centric works in late 1938 / early 1939 was always going to be a minatory affair. The Zeitgeist hangs heavily over both performances. The evil that took an entire world to extinguish almost materialises before one's eyes . . . . .

De Sabata is a first class Brahmsian: this Fourth is just as memorable as offerings from Furtwangler, Herbie and Kleiber. Mind you, he transgresses the law to get to the spirit, tempo-wise - but we are the beneficiaries. The last movement is the quintessence of drama - even Attic drama. And it's a damn fine recording: sure, the timpani is a little bit recessed, but for all its limitations, it is a far more natural sounding affair than the Kleiber from 1980. The Death and Transfiguration is masterly. Even so: the Brahms is the greater work and this particular performance makes one wonder if old Johannes belonged to the ranks of Isaiah, Nahum & Jeremiah when he penned the Fourth . . . . .

Don't hesitate.


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