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Symphony No. 1


Price: CDN$ 13.26 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details

  • Composer: Rouse Christopher
  • Audio CD (Feb. 22 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Fed
  • ASIN: B00020HBV4
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #251,608 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Symphony No.1
2. I. The Evestrum Of Juan De La Cruz In The Sagrada Familia At 3 A.M.
3. II. The Infernal Machine
4. III. Bump

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
There seems to be a stigma surrounding new music that prevents many audiences from ever experiencing the sheer passion and beauty that is often created by today's many gifted composers. Fortunately, Christopher Rouse's music is heard relatively often, which is a blessing for both the composer and the listener.
The "Symphony #1" is one of Rouse's most tonal pieces. It was composed shortly after the extremely dissonant, atonal, and fast-paced "Gorgon"--Rouse describes the two as a "yin and yang to each other". Therefore, the aim of this piece is an adagio and tonal (though still dissonant, but do you expect otherwise from Rouse?) piece. The tonality is often blurred, but certain recurring melodic and rhythmic motives enrapture the listener. Rouse infuses too much passion and emotion into the score to solicit any loss of interest. In short, it's difficult to get bored during the 24 minutes that make up this piece.
"Phantasmata", on the other hand, is less emotionally taxing and more fun. It is a much more dissonant piece, which may turn off some listeners, but if you don't mind that sort of thing, this piece shouldn't be missed either.
I can't really comment on the performance, since there are no other recordings I know of that I can compare it with, but the Baltimore Symphony does justice to the demanding score.
It's a keeper.
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By A Customer on May 30 2001
Format: Audio CD
Christopher Rouse has become one of America's most special and amazing composers. This is a wonderful recording of his deeply moving first symphony, a tragic but finally consoling work. David Zinman is one of Rouse's biggest champions, so I am certain that this recording represents the music as the composer wished it to sound. This is not difficult music to listen to in terms of style, though its dark message may make it hard for some to grapple with. Phantasmata is a more dissonant piece, but somehow it all turns out to be fun. This is extraordinary music.
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Format: Audio CD
Rouse's "First Symphony" is indeed a serious affair. In fact if you look out at the world,all you see is the deep disturbed anxiety Rouse manipulates here. He has this gut-wrenching melos in the money-making part of the high register of the violins. You could almost say it is a few feet away from film music. But I'm sorry Rouse is much to bound to his aesthetic object to be so obvious. This is also a marvelous piece of orchestration with the middle register of the orchestra torn out setting up this gut-churning opening. The low densely packed violoncellos,bassoons, and lower brass work so well, you can almost move a mountain with them. I found this so overwhelming and powerful that there was nothing left for me in the remainder. Like Rouse wants you to spend your emotions up front at the box office. The quick toccata like rhythms which take us home to the finale I don't think equals the expressive torrent of bursting passion. But then we live under the primary sign of postmodernity, not every artistic element can or should be explained and is a creative problem Rouse must ultimately deal with,not us out here. The "Infernal Machine" etc. we see yet another gifted talent bought off by facile market persuasions. It makes a fascinating orchestration ride a la Adams This is a fast paced,quick contrast,quick fix, like a stand-up comic waiting for the right timing. Henny Youngman could learn something from Rouse, at least in this piece. Zinman and Baltimore play their hearts out.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
What's so bad about new music anyway? Jan. 27 2002
By Dr. Fartmeister - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
There seems to be a stigma surrounding new music that prevents many audiences from ever experiencing the sheer passion and beauty that is often created by today's many gifted composers. Fortunately, Christopher Rouse's music is heard relatively often, which is a blessing for both the composer and the listener.
The "Symphony #1" is one of Rouse's most tonal pieces. It was composed shortly after the extremely dissonant, atonal, and fast-paced "Gorgon"--Rouse describes the two as a "yin and yang to each other". Therefore, the aim of this piece is an adagio and tonal (though still dissonant, but do you expect otherwise from Rouse?) piece. The tonality is often blurred, but certain recurring melodic and rhythmic motives enrapture the listener. Rouse infuses too much passion and emotion into the score to solicit any loss of interest. In short, it's difficult to get bored during the 24 minutes that make up this piece.
"Phantasmata", on the other hand, is less emotionally taxing and more fun. It is a much more dissonant piece, which may turn off some listeners, but if you don't mind that sort of thing, this piece shouldn't be missed either.
I can't really comment on the performance, since there are no other recordings I know of that I can compare it with, but the Baltimore Symphony does justice to the demanding score.
It's a keeper.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
extraordinary music May 30 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Christopher Rouse has become one of America's most special and amazing composers. This is a wonderful recording of his deeply moving first symphony, a tragic but finally consoling work. David Zinman is one of Rouse's biggest champions, so I am certain that this recording represents the music as the composer wished it to sound. This is not difficult music to listen to in terms of style, though its dark message may make it hard for some to grapple with. Phantasmata is a more dissonant piece, but somehow it all turns out to be fun. This is extraordinary music.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Powerful Modern Music Dec 20 2008
By Jerry of San Francisco - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is powerful music. Though it is modern music, I think it will find a large audience of classical music and beyond. The theme is very sad throughout and reminds me of Wagner, Shostokovitch and Mahler. There are a couple of times when the music is quiet and suddently startles with it's intensity. The recording is good.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
product was fantastic June 5 2013
By marisa volino - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I needed this CD for a dance performance. The quality was perfect and it came in the mail in time for my deadline.
6 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Gut-wrenching opening not fulfilling its emotive promise April 9 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Rouse's "First Symphony" is indeed a serious affair. In fact if you look out at the world,all you see is the deep disturbed anxiety Rouse manipulates here. He has this gut-wrenching melos in the money-making part of the high register of the violins. You could almost say it is a few feet away from film music. But I'm sorry Rouse is much to bound to his aesthetic object to be so obvious. This is also a marvelous piece of orchestration with the middle register of the orchestra torn out setting up this gut-churning opening. The low densely packed violoncellos,bassoons, and lower brass work so well, you can almost move a mountain with them. I found this so overwhelming and powerful that there was nothing left for me in the remainder. Like Rouse wants you to spend your emotions up front at the box office. The quick toccata like rhythms which take us home to the finale I don't think equals the expressive torrent of bursting passion. But then we live under the primary sign of postmodernity, not every artistic element can or should be explained and is a creative problem Rouse must ultimately deal with,not us out here. The "Infernal Machine" etc. we see yet another gifted talent bought off by facile market persuasions. It makes a fascinating orchestration ride a la Adams This is a fast paced,quick contrast,quick fix, like a stand-up comic waiting for the right timing. Henny Youngman could learn something from Rouse, at least in this piece. Zinman and Baltimore play their hearts out.

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