Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Symphony No. 7 in E Major [Hybrid SACD]

Jansons; Symphonieorchester Des Bayerischen Rundfunks , Bruckner Anton Audio CD

Price: CDN$ 22.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Wednesday, September 17? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Product Description

Product Description

Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks - Mariss Jansons, direction

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wanted: Otherness July 6 2013
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
The Hotspur Principle says this: any conductor can call the spirits from the vasty deep - but will they come? In all matters Bruckner, their presence is mandatory. By and large, they're the raison d'être of his music: to befall Otherness and be transfigured therein. Otherwise, another favourite principle of mine kicks in - the Celan Principle: "No-one kneads us again from earth and clay - no-one summons our dust - no-one."

Backed by a first-class Brucknerian outfit - the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Kubelik's old warhorse) and superb engineering, Mariss Jansons has every right to stand on the edge of the abyss and summon the spirits with high expectations. Alas for one and all, no response is forthcoming. In consequence, the listener is left with a well-played and thoroughly mundane account of this numinous score. Just listen to the self-contained episode before the coda in the first movement: knock, knock - is anyone there!

Not that our Latvian friend does his chances any good with unimaginative phrasing and an inability to inject tension into proceedings.

In summary, this issue has a mesmeric front-cover and that's about it. Stick with the Karajan from 1977, emblazoned with the Winged Victory.
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars If you think Michelangelo would be better in pastel colors, here is Bruckner to match Dec 8 2009
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's rare for a conductor, however prestigious, to manage two Bruckner CDs at once. Mariss Jansons has the advantage of leading the Royal concertgebouw, which has a house label, and the Bavarisn Radio Sym. Orch., which has managed the trick of having a Sony BMG contract (no doubt subsidized). with the Concertgebouw he has released a polished but tepid pairing of the Bruckner Third and Fourth. Here in Munich we get the Seventh by itself. A leopard doesn't change its spots by getting on a jet and flying a few hundred miles. The opening of the seventh, one of the most gloriously unfolding melodies in classical music, falls flat: no mystery, tension, anticipation, just a seamless lyrical song sung in a monotone.

The Gramophone loved Janson's third and Fourth, so I am braced to be told that my taste is fallible. All I can do is to prepare any prospective buyer for a smooth, beautifully played, and very tame interpretation. The Bavarian musicians can't be faulted for technique; the brass blend beautifully, the strings exhibit impeccable ensemble. But who cares? If music can't be dramatized, it hasn't fulfilled its potential, and the Bruckner Seventh has enormous built-in drama that is being completely flattened by Janson's gentility and caution. Even the relatively cautious Abbado on DG is on fire by comparison, and when we speak of truly great Bruckner Sevenths from Karajan, Giulini, and Furtwangler, this new recording is completely outclassed. Tempos are all middle of the road; the overall timing of 65 min. streamlines the music compared to Karajan's stately 69 min. but dawdles compared to Harnoncourt's 60 min. -- the latter turns in a memorable reading, as does Chailly on Decca.

In sum, this is Bruckner for those who want to hear his music once over lightly, but not for me.
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bruckner Classical CD Jan. 12 2012
By Vincent Lavallee - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Bruckner wrote some very powerful music, and this CD sounds absolutely great! But you need a pretty good stereo system to get its full advantage. This is a very full sounding CD - fills the room with music!
3 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent live performance Dec 16 2009
By Mark Twain - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This might not be my number-one choice of a Bruckner 7 recording. That would probably go to Karajan with Vienna, or maybe Jochum with Berlin. But Jansons puts in a really excellent performance, with more energy and vitality than Karajan and with more spontaneity than Jochum (his was a studio recording). Jansons has arguably the best orchestra of the three, and definitely the best recorded sound. The BRSO are obviously very at home in this rep, and it shows. So you could do much worse than this recording, but in the end I still prefer Karajan and Jochum.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback