Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

TINA MODOTTI [Hardcover]

Cacucci/Duncan Cacucci/Duncan
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Feb. 28 1999
The life of Tina Modotti is the stuff of enduring legend. Her sensual, melancholic beauty inspired the work of the most brilliant artists, photographers, and writers of her time, including Diego Rivera, Edward Weston, and Pablo Neruda. Her fierce commitment to the social and political causes of the working class and her affiliation with the Mexican Communist Party landed her at the center of national controversy in Mexico. A gifted photographer in her own right, Modotti is now widely recognized as one of the great artists of the early twentieth century.

Born in Udine, Italy, in 1896, Tina Modotti immigrated to the United States at the age of seventeen, settling with her family in San Francisco in order to escape the misery and poverty of the world from which they came. Modotti initially sought work in the local silk factory and as a dressmaker, but her beauty and poise soon launched her into a career as a silent film actress and artist's model. It was through her work as a model that she met photographer Edward Weston. Though already married to California poet Roubaix de l'Abrie Richey (known as Robo), Modotti fell in love with Weston and with photography and left with him for Mexico in 1922.

It was in Mexico that Modotti blossomed, both as a talented artist and as a fiery and dedicated worker for the cause of the revolutionary left, and where she befriended artists Rivera and Frieda Kahlo. However, in 1929 Modotti, long under suspicion by the Mexican police, was arrested in connection with the murder of Julio Antonio Mella, a Cuban revolutionary and also her lover. Though the real killers were never identified, the Mexican press raised a scandal by publishing nude photographs of Modotti taken by Weston and depicting her as a woman of easy virtue. She was eventually exiled from Mexico. Denied re-entry to the United States, Modotti fled first to Germany and then to Moscow, where she abandoned her photography and worked as a bureaucrat for the Communist Party and traveled on clandestine missions for the "Red Rescue."

In 1936 Modotti moved to Spain, where she met Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, Andre Malraux, and Robert Capa. Although Capa tried to encourage her to take up her photography again, Modotti was by now dedicating herself exclusively to political militancy. At the fall of the Spanish Republic in 1939, Modotti returned to Mexico, where she died on January 5, 1942.

In this internationally acclaimed biography, Pino Cacucci brings the adventurous, riveting, and tragic story of Tina Modotti to life. He shows great compassion for his subject even as he explores the darker side of the passion that drove her--a side filled with doubts and fears regarding her actions and her commitment to the political cause in which she found herself entrenched. Set in Mexico, Germany, and Spain, with a large and fascinating cast of notable characters, Tina Modotti penetrates the inner sanctum of communism and the artistic circles of the late 1920s and '30s, and it paints a brilliant portrait of a woman and an era.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Amazon

In 1913 Italian-born Modotti (1896-1943) immigrated to the United States, where she enthusiastically embraced both radical politics and photographer Edward Weston, the first of many prominent men who would love the charismatic artist. Apart from the formally rigorous, socially engaged photographs that made her reputation, Modotti's most ardent passions were for revolutionary Mexico, where she lived from 1922 to 1930, and for Communist activist Julio Mella, whose murder in 1929 engulfed her in the juicy scandal with which Italian journalist Cacucci opens his dishy biography. Modotti spent the 1930s serving the Soviet Union's interests in many of the world's hot spots, notably Spain during its vicious civil war; commitment to Communism gave her a sense of stability her turbulent personal affairs did not. She died mysteriously four years after her return to Mexico, by rumor at the hands of Stalinist poisoners. Cacucci's fascination with abstruse Communist ideological squabbles may not be shared by all readers, and his methodology is decidedly slapdash: he doesn't provide footnotes, and pages of direct dialogue have no discernable source other than the author's imagination. However, his breathless prose certainly conveys the drama of Modotti's short, intense life. --Wendy Smith

From Library Journal

The photographer and Communist organizer Tina Modotti (18961942) lived in a seeming whirlwind of artistic creation and personal and political intrigue. Two new biographies trace her life as she developed her immense artistic skill, loved passionately, and eventually sacrificed her art to her work for social justice through the Communist Party. In a brief and clipped work, Italian journalist Cacucci lays out the machinations of Modottis life. He sketches a chronology of her love lifeincluding her relationships with the young poet known as Robo, the photographer Edward Weston, the Cuban revolutionary Julio Antonio Mella, and the menacing Soviet operative Vidali Vittorioand seems unduly fascinated by the power of Modottis beauty. As a result, she comes off as a frail social climber, and the book is tiring at best. On the other hand, in the most complete and readable biography of Modotti to date, Albers, a curator and writer, portrays a complex woman who made extraordinary life choices in an attempt to unite personal desires with the social realities of her time. While men were important to Modotti (she once playfully proclaimed them to be her profession), she was a thoroughly modern woman who cared most about navigating the wavering balance between life, art, and the need for social change. Albers avoids casting Modotti in a clich, acknowledging that she was never entirely free of either the fear of impoverishment or the encumbering domestic role women were expected to play. Rather, Modottis mind was often absorbed in the minutiae of life: setting up households, making pasta, planning art shows, and facilitating Party efforts. When considered in this context, Modotti seems more inspired workhorse than princessand all the more interesting for the added detail. Libraries can avoid Cacuccis effort, but Alberss is essential. [Photographs not seen.]Rebecca Miller, Library Journa.
-Rebecca Miller, Library Journal
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
1 star
0
3.5 out of 5 stars
3.5 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars LAUGHABLE for its historical value Dec 19 2000
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Although I agree that San Francisco was home to many artistic and cultural activities that make it distict from any other American city, to assert that it was "Not founded by Anglo-Saxon Protestants, San Francisco developed as a city without Puritan influences, much like the great European cities that favored radical innovations and a healthy indifference toward conventional morality." (can you taste the superiority of the european writer in that quote?)
Anyone who believes that does not know who founded San Fransisco. Guess what. It was Mormons. Yep. They pulled into the bay and off loaded from the Good Ship The Brooklyn, before the gold rush and mass influx of others. Before that, it had been all but abandon as a Presidio by the Spanish. And since I know my history, I can tell you the Mormons of that time had more in common with the Puritanism of the original colonies than other Anglos. But that is just one of the stretches... Of course the Mormons were over run with the advent of the Gold Rush. San Francisco has been a pendulum that swings back and forth from anarchy to corruption in its city government in the last 150 years.
As for the rest of the book, take out some of the added quasi-history spices and it would have been much more valuable, or at least worth recommending. But maybe I shouldn't look at it for historical value, but as a great romance?
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars An astonishing life! Feb. 15 1999
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
Tina Modotti -- photographer, model, lover of famous men, revolutionary Communist. What a fascinating life. I finished this biography -- which flows like a novel -- inspired to follow my own convictions and amazed by this bewitching, powerful woman.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An astonishing life! Feb. 15 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Tina Modotti -- photographer, model, lover of famous men, revolutionary Communist. What a fascinating life. I finished this biography -- which flows like a novel -- inspired to follow my own convictions and amazed by this bewitching, powerful woman.
5 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars LAUGHABLE for its historical value Dec 19 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Although I agree that San Francisco was home to many artistic and cultural activities that make it distict from any other American city, to assert that it was "Not founded by Anglo-Saxon Protestants, San Francisco developed as a city without Puritan influences, much like the great European cities that favored radical innovations and a healthy indifference toward conventional morality." (can you taste the superiority of the european writer in that quote?)
Anyone who believes that does not know who founded San Fransisco. Guess what. It was Mormons. Yep. They pulled into the bay and off loaded from the Good Ship The Brooklyn, before the gold rush and mass influx of others. Before that, it had been all but abandon as a Presidio by the Spanish. And since I know my history, I can tell you the Mormons of that time had more in common with the Puritanism of the original colonies than other Anglos. But that is just one of the stretches... Of course the Mormons were over run with the advent of the Gold Rush. San Francisco has been a pendulum that swings back and forth from anarchy to corruption in its city government in the last 150 years.
As for the rest of the book, take out some of the added quasi-history spices and it would have been much more valuable, or at least worth recommending. But maybe I shouldn't look at it for historical value, but as a great romance?
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback