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TRENDnet TEG-S50g 5-Port Unmanaged GigaBit GREENnet Switch 5 x 10/100/1000 Mbps Auto-Negotiation, Auto-MDIX GigaBit Ethernet Ports (Black Metal)

by TRENDnet
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 36.99
Price: CDN$ 34.93 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Product Features

  • GREENnet technology reduces power consumption by up to 70-Percent
  • 5 Gigabit Auto-Negotiation ports
  • Build a high performance energy efficient Gigabit network in minutes
  • Sturdy metal switch has a simple Plug and Play installation
  • 5-Year limited warranty


Product Details


Product Description

From Amazon.ca

The compact 5-Port Gigabit GREENnet Switch provides high bandwidth performance, ease of use and reliability, all while reducing power consumption by up to 70%. GREENnet technology automatically adjusts power voltage as needed, resulting in substantial energy savings. Boost your office efficiency and eliminate network congestion with Gigabit speeds and total switching capacity of 10Gbps with Full-Duplex Mode. Plug and Play this sturdy metal switch for reliable high-speed network connectivity.

Product Description

The TRENDnet 5-Port Gigabit GREENnet Ethernet Switch provides high bandwidth performance, ease of use, and reliability, all while reducing power consumption by up to 70%. GREENnet technology automatically adjusts power voltage as needed, resulting in substantial energy savings. Boost your office efficiency and eliminate network congestion with Gigabit speeds and total switching capacity of 10Gbps with Full-Duplex Mode. The plug-and-play TRENDnet 5-Port Gigabit GREENnet Ethernet switch provides reliable, high-speed network connectivity.


Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Works good Sept. 4 2011
Been running for over a month, non stop activity with no freezes or reboots.

Nothing more expected from gigabit switch.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  1,359 reviews
226 of 233 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quiet, fast, and low power as promised Aug. 28 2009
By Pilchard - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Recently we have installed network storage devices, and started to run backups and multi-media services on our home LAN (local area network). As a result the load on our network increased substantially. We decided to upgrade from fast ethernet to gigabit. Due to the arrangement of devices, we have several 8 port switches connected to a larger 24 bit switch which I guess is the backbone of our LAN.

When shopping for gigabit switches, the Trendnet 8 port gigabit greennet switch came up as not only a low cost, but also a low power switch. We purchased several and have been using them for almost half a year.

These switches are silent (there is no fan), and very low power (on my Killowatt meter they always show 0 watts), and very fast. They have limited support for jumbo packets (I forget the exact number, but its around a jumbo packet size of 7-9K).

This is a good solution as a low power, silent, gigabit switch that runs cool and is low cost. The switch is unmanaged, but does have status indicator lights. You will see if you are getting fast ethernet or gigabit speeds on each port. We have had no trouble with these switches.
107 of 108 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just works, never have to touch it! Feb. 28 2011
By J. Blair - Published on Amazon.com
I upgraded from an 8 port Gigabit Trendnet switch to this bad boy with 16 ports. I've got 15/16 used up and it's never let me down. I can easily get transfer speeds between my two gigabit desktops of around 90-110 MB/s (using 7200RPM and SSD Hard Drives#.

All I had to do was plug in my ethernet cables, turn the power on and haven't touched it since. Reliable and fast connection for all the devices on my home network.

No fan inside, it doesn't run hot even in a wall box and it's completely silent.

LED's on the front will tell you if a device is connected and if it's Green it's connected at Gigabit and Amber if it's 10/100.

Very satisfied with the purchase and would recommend to anyone looking to venture to the Gigabit realm. FYI you will need Gigabit ethernet cards on the computers that you want to connect to the network to get Gigabit speeds #125MB/s vs 12.5MB/s on 10/100# so don't expect your 3-4 year old Desktop to connect at gigabit speeds. But don't fret, gigabit NIC's are pretty cheap, I got this low profile #for slim computers# Dynex - Gigabit PCI Desktop Adapter DX-PCIGB used for about $6 on Amazon #3rd party seller#, but you can just search "Gigabit ethernet card" and find them new for around $10-$15 new with full size bracket# Make sure it says Gigabit or 10/100/1000 in the title though as Gigabit is for some reason a key word on some 10/100 cards#

If you're wondering what you'll gain from going gigabit, here's a brief overview of bits and Bytes and 10/100 vs 10/100/1000 #gigabit#:

MB = Mega Bytes, Mb = Mega Bits. 8 bits in 1 Byte

You have a 100 MB file. If you transfer at 100 Mb/s it will download in 12.5 seconds.

If you have a 100 MB file and you transfer it at 100 MB/s, it will transfer in 1 second.

If your Internet provider says you can download at speeds up to 8 Mb/s. That means you can download 1 MB in 1 second.

If your Internet provider says you can download at speeds up to 16 Mb/s. That means you can download 2 MB in 1 second.

Transfer speed on a 10/100 router would be up to 12.5 MB/s.

Transfer speed on a 10/100/1000 #gigabit# router would be up to 125 MB/s.

Say you have a DVD rip that is 2.5GB, on a hard wire connection between 2 gigabit computers it would take roughly 20 seconds to transfer. On a 10/100 connection it would take about 3 minutes and 20 seconds.

Say you have a 1080p MKV video file that is 32GB, on a hard wire connection between 2 gigabit computers it would take roughly 4 minutes and 16 seconds to transfer. On a 10/100 connection it would take about 42 minutes and 40 seconds.

Note: These are theoretical speeds and much depends on your processing speed and also your hard drive speed.

If you have any questions just comment, I get automatic e-mail notifications on comments and will answer questions as quickly as possible.

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Update 03/01/2012:

It's been a year now since it's been installed and left in the wall. Never had an issue with it this whole time, even with power outages, lighting strikes #killed my Xbox#, it has been rock solid. Still highly recommended.

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Update 04/13/2013:

Another year and still no issues. I took it out of the wall when I moved and now it's located on a shelf in my laundry room which can get quite humid when the dryer runs and still running like a champ.
145 of 149 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Netgear USED to be.... July 17 2010
By Josh Daniel S. Davis - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This switch is solid. In 3 months, I've had no problems with this Trendnet switch.

Compare to my netgear crashes, gets into reboot loops, etc even after power brick and switch replacement.

The Trendnet switch runs cooler than the netgear counterpart.

The Trendnet, like the NetGear, has a metal case for better EMI control. The netgear case is just slightly thicker, which should provide better in-case ventilation.

The Trendnet switch has ports/power on the back, and activity/connection LEDs on the front. Because of this, it makes for a much more tidy desk, and easier to see link lights.

We'll see how this is doing when it's a year, or 18 months old, but so far, it's power-on durability exceeds the competition.

NOTE: This is an unmanaged switch. 10/100/1000 line speed, auto-crossover. There is no monitoring port, no web management, no SNMP, no IP sharing, and no routing.

This is a low cost, and well designed device. I highly recommend it.
155 of 165 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast, affordable, economical June 27 2010
By Wayne - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This switch is well built with a metal case, performs well, and is economical. I did lots of benchmarks and found that I got maximum speeds while doing multiple concurrent large inter-computer file transfers. I repeated some of the tests while bypassing the switch to see if there was a change in speed and there was none, so this switch kept up with whatever I could throw at it. If you want more speed, chances are you will gain more with better cables/plugs/jacks/etc. rather than looking for a faster switch.

I also used a Kill-A-Watt meter to see how much energy this uses. The amount was so low that it took days to get meaningful readings, and this will cost pennies a year and electricity is not cheap where I live. Also, the switch is economically priced. This switch caused my network diagnostic to misreport cable quality as poor, but although some utilities might give you false readings, your connection will not suffer.

I read elsewhere that this switch is not compatible with WOL (wake on LAN/magic packet) and the person who posted that got the information from Trendnet support. It turns out that this works PERFECTLY with WOL as long as your computer's port is set to auto negotiation. In other words, if there's any limitation, it's with the quality of tech support, not with this switch.

The only minor negatives are that the printing next to the LEDs is not on both sides, so it will appear upside-down if this is wall mounted, making it awkward to keep track of port numbers. Also, the slots for wall mounting could have been bigger to accommodate larger screws. The documentation is minimal, but this is pretty much plug and play.

UPDATE Jan 2011. I have read comments from customers who have had problems using multiple switches of this model on the same network. I have three of them. One is connected with approximately 25 meters of Cat-5e cable to another on a different floor in my home. The cable run is UTP, about half vertical, and half horizontal though an attic with no shielding (except distance) from other cables such as power cables. A third switch is connected with approximately 8 inches of the same type cable, allowing me to have more ports in that location. Benchmarks of file transfers will not give a true picture, since the weakest link (hard drive speed, overhead from data encapsulation, switches, network cards, wall jacks, drivers, cable, etc.) will be the limiting factor. All other parts of the chain will perform at least as well as the benchmark suggests.

I tried copying about 450 GB of relatively large and barely compressible data coming from images of blu-ray and DVD sources. Transferring through all three switches, full length of the cable, etc. gave me transfer speeds of about 96MB/sec. Presumably, the hard disk arrays are the limiting factors in my system, but the switches clearly had no trouble with those sustained speeds. I used Windows 7 drag and drop over a network, which is not among the most efficient methods. A series of smaller files such as JPEGs gave me "speeds" closer to 15MB/sec, which really means that the speed over the wire was probably about the same, but a large amount of the data was overhead encapsulation.

Although it's likely that the switch was not the limiting factor, it's clear that users who are getting poorer performance have other factors that limit performance, making it impossible to say that the switches are the cause of their performance issues. A direct run of cable from one of the computers to the other, bypassing all three switches, would show if there were any increase in performance, thus showing if the switches themselves (or something related to plugs, cables, or jacks) caused the problems. But the speeds I got from several such tests were consistent, and higher than what I would have expected given that I used Windows drag and drop over a network.
50 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid performance in my home network March 20 2011
By Paul Gifford - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I bought two of these TRENDnet switches (a 5 port and an 8 port) when I upgraded our home network from 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps speed. I'm very happy with their performance and stability. I haven't had to think of them once since connecting them to the network. Both switches are connected to a D-Link DIR-655 Router: one with 100 feet of CAT-6 cable and the other with 25 feet.

This switch isn't very large - about the size of a paperback book. I've uploaded a picture to the product page to give you an idea of its relative size. The measurement from our Kill A Watt meter agrees with what others have already noted; this switch uses very little power. The lights on the front are helpful: green indicates a 1 Gbps connection while amber means a 100 Mbps connection.

To get a measure of speed through the switch I copied a 26 GB file between two computers connected to the same switch using drag and drop in Windows Explorer. Average speed for the transfer was 102 MB/sec. That was before enabling jumbo frames on the source and target computers.

This router supports jumbo frames up to 9216 bytes. In real world performance I achieved best performance with the computers configured for 4k frames. Between two Windows 7 64-bit computers I averaged 114 MB/sec tranferring the 26 GB file. Between a Windows 7 computer and a Windows Home Server (version 1) I averaged 109 MB/sec.

To enable jumbo frame support in Windows, right-click on Computer and select Manage. Click on Device Manager, open Network Adapters, right-click on your adapter and select Properties. Under the Advanced tab select Jumbo Frame and choose an appropriate value. Note this only applies to wired adapters; wireless connections don't support jumbo frames.

I've got absolutely no complaints about this switch. It's a great value and perfect for our home network.
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