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Tagine Greats: 100 Delicious Tagine Recipes, the Top 100 Moroccan Tajine Recipes - Second Edition Paperback – Dec 11 2009


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Tagine Greats: 100 Delicious Tagine Recipes, the Top 100 Moroccan Tajine Recipes - Second Edition + 150 Best Tagine Recipes: Including Tantalizing Recipes for Spice Blends and Accompaniments + Tagine
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 202 pages
  • Publisher: Emereo Publishing; 2 edition (Dec 11 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1742442323
  • ISBN-13: 978-1742442327
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.2 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 322 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #248,030 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Liz on Nov. 4 2012
Format: Paperback
Includes both recipes for putting your tagine in the oven and on the stovetop. Common ingredients. No pictures though. Pretty good book overall.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just purchased a Tagine and this book is must have! Full of delicious recipes cannot wait to try. Not complicate ingredients and easy to follow instructions. Worth the purchase!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
"Tagine" cookbook April 13 2010
By C. Vernon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm very hesitant to review this cookbook because it is so bad! I have never seen such a poorly organized, poorly edited book in my life (and I've lived quite a few decades). I own many, many cookbooks--too many to count--but this is the worst one I've ever laid eyes on. There is not a single picture in it. The ingredient lists are incomplete, i.e. it lists measurements but not the name of the ingredient! Hello! Oven temperatures are only given in Celsius, not Fahrenheit. Many of the recipes give weights only, not our usual cup and tablespoon and teaspoon measurements. I think you get the idea. I returned the book to Amazon, and to their credit they gave me a full refund. I wish I could have given it zero stars.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Poor formatting-Good recipes May 27 2010
By Julia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I agree with the other reader who said the formatting on the kindle was horrendous. It is. The sentences run into each other and they are at uneven levels across the page. However, this is not the book's fault; it is whomever transcribes it fault. The recipes are delicious, and I didn't really need pictures-a stew is a stew (pretty much a tagine is a slow cooked stew). The one inconsistency I noticed was that sometimes the recipes were in grams and some recipes were in cups and tbsp. A previous reviewer stated the oven temp was in Celsius but I didn't notice. I know at least one recipe uses Fahrenheit. Overall- good recipes, poor formatting.
If it seems awful it's because it's ripped off other free online sources and cookbooks Nov. 3 2014
By FREELANCE HELPERS INTERNATIONAL - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is plagiarized off other cookbooks by a publisher that specializes in gathering free online content and repackaging it as "books," much of it Wikipedia, Emereo's best source of text for many of its thousands of books, many of which have been taken down by amazon. As always no credit is given. And this "publisher" continues unabated, pushing the limits to see how many books he can sell that are ripped of from other sources.

The introduction alone is all lifted completely from text written by Paula Wolfert - I include it below so that due credit is given to this author. For Ms Jo Frank to think this will pass unnoticed, well let's just say, she picked the wrong author to copy.

Why? Because Paula Wolfert is one of the best known international chefs , with eight previously published cookbooks, all considered classics. According to her website, these include: "Couscous and Other Good Food From Morocco, The Cooking of Southwest France, and five books on Mediterranean cuisine including the much praised Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean." She is a heavy weight - she has won the Julia Child Award three times, The James Beard Award five times, The M. F. K. Fisher Award, The Tastemaker Award and been a finalist for the British Andre Simon Award. She is the creator of the open Facebook Moroccan Cooking Group.

To wit, this is the main source for the introduction, Tagines dot com,. Compare it with the intro to this book and you'll see it's identical.

"A tagine (tajine in Europe but never tangine) is a type of dish found in the North African cuisine of Morocco. It is named after the special pot in which it is cooked. The traditional tagine pot is formed entirely of heavy clay which is sometimes painted, glazed, or remain unglazed. A tagine consists of two parts, a base unit which is flat and circular with low sides, and a large conical and dome-shaped cover that rests inside the base ring during cooking. The cover is so designed to promote the return of all condensation to the bottom.

Tagines in Moroccan cuisine are slow-cooked dishes braised at low temperatures, resulting in tender meat with aromatic vegetables and sauce. Tagines can be made vegetarian or wwith meat. The preferred cuts of lamb are the neck, shoulder or shank cooked until it is falling off the bone. It can also be made with any meat. Moroccan tagines often combine lamb or chicken with a medley of ingredients and seasonings."

According to Paula Wolfert: "No matter what the month, there is a tree somewhere in Morocco bearing fruit for the tagine pot. The combinations may seem unlikely at times, but I guarantee you will find them delicious: lamb with olives, quinces, apples, pears, raisins, prunes, dates, with or without honey, with or without a complexity of spices.

In the fall, use greening or wine sap apples. In the summer, try fresh apricots, or the type of hard, fuzzy, green crab apples called, in Morocco, lehmenn. In winter, I recommend the heavy and rich tagines made with prunes or dates, and, anytime of the year, lemon and olives.

The combination of lemon and olives is so popular in Morocco that one ought to regard it as a general theme on which variations, each one applicable to a specific category of sauce, are possible. Different-flavored olives work best with specific combinations of spices. For example, the following multi- spiced classic employs the green-cracked type of olives, more appropriate here than mellow reddish purple olives, which are used with sauces made with a combination of ginger, saffron, and olive oil. In the following recipe, as the sauce begins to boil, the cracked olives will release some of their juices, which in turn will thicken the sauce.

Most tagines involve slow simmering of less-expensive meats. The ideal cuts of lamb are the neck, shoulder or shank cooked until it is falling off the bone. Very few Moroccan tagines require initial browning; if there is to be browning it is invariably done after the lamb has been simmered and the flesh has become butter-tender and very moist. In order to accomplish this, the cooking liquid must contain some fat. Don't be concerned by this, later it is all skimmed off."

courtesy of Paula Wolfert

Compare it and you will see - this book is plagiarized.
recipes rock! Sept. 14 2013
By shoemaven - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
the formatting may be awful but the recipes are excellent!! i have used this book many times and have never been disappointed with any of its recipes
When I saw the "this fabulous book..." on the back cover I couldn't stop laughing. Dec 21 2012
By Gusztav Rozsa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I see better written and formatted student papers on a daily bases and I' not even exaggerating. So much so, first I thought I received an draft copy by mistake. (I have the printed edition not the e-book one.)
For the 20 buck I paid for it, I'd say it is 2-4 times overpriced.
The only reason I'm not returning it because the recipes included look promising, so there is your two stars.


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