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  • Take the Money and Run / Prends l'oseille et tire-toi
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Take the Money and Run / Prends l'oseille et tire-toi


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Take the Money and Run / Prends l'oseille et tire-toi + Sleeper + Play It Again, Sam (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Woody Allen, Janet Margolin, Marcel Hillaire, Jacquelyn Hyde, Lonny Chapman
  • Directors: Woody Allen
  • Writers: Woody Allen, Mickey Rose
  • Producers: Charles H. Joffe, Edgar J. Scherick, Jack Grossberg, Jack Rollins, Sidney Glazier
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Fox Video (Canada) Limited
  • Release Date: July 6 2004
  • Run Time: 85 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00020X88E
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #56,092 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Gittins on July 8 2004
Format: DVD
"Take The Money and Run" is presented as a biographical documentary of Virgil Starkwell (Allen), a petty criminal.
He has a difficult childhood, and plays the cello in a marching band (but sitting on a chair and trying to keep up with the others). He begins a life of crime by robbing an armored car, but is quickly caught. In prison, he models a fake gun and tries an unsuccessful escape. Later, in exchange for a pardon, he volunteers for an experimental vaccine, the only side effect is turning him into a rabbi for a few hours. From time to time, his parents are interviewed (wearing Groucho Marx disguises). Finally released, he rents a room. He then begins another life of crime with purse snatching and small robberies.
Intending to steal her purse, Virgil meets a young woman, Louise, who is a laundress, and is smitten. He narrates his nauseous nature when in love. He robs a soda machine for money and goes to dinner on a date with Louise. Now he is in love. Virgil tries to rob a bank - but can't write a legible holdup note, and gets arrested and put back in prison, where he gets visits from Louise. Although she says she will wait for Virgil, he plans an escape. The warden gets wind of the plan, so the escaping group calls it off but forgets to tell Virgil, who tries it alone, and improbably escapes.
Virgil and Louise get married, and of course later Louise gets pregnant. Virgil wants to go straight and tries to get job as insurance agent, but is hired instead as for the mailroom. He is ferreted out by a coworker and is blackmailed. Virgil contemplates murdering her, but is unsucessful in every attempt, including stabbing her with a turkey leg, but finally is accidentally lucky with the exploding candlesticks.
Petty crimes follow in his life on the run.
Read more ›
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Format: DVD
A brilliant mock-documentary on the life of a criminal - played by
Allen - with some of the funniest lines and sight gags I've ever seen
in a film. It's important to remember that 'mockumentaries' weren't
common when Allen made this, and it was actually seen as quite
experimental in it's own crazy, low budget way.

This isn't the deep, brilliant film-maker of 'Annie Hall', etc, but an
amazingly smart and funny young Allen capturing the spirit of cinema
anarchists like the Marx Brothers.

The only small drawbacks; a sometimes cloying musical score and a
couple of slow sections around the love story. But these are very small
flies in the great ointment.

A minor point - there's a some debate as to whether the correct aspect ratio is 1:66
or 1:85. From what research I could do (as well as old fading memories of seeing the
film in theaters) I think 1:66 is actually correct.

There are various releases floating around in full-screen, 1:66 and 1:85.
Probably not a life or death difference, but worth noting
for purists.

Like many of Allen's film's this now seems to bizarrely be out of
print. So while it's available used, you might want to grab a copy.
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Format: DVD
From around this early time, before Allen truly crystallized his peculiar brand of a nebbish neurotic New York man, I had enjoyed Bananas and Sleeper for their sheer creativity and comic pizzazz. I thought Take the Money and Run would be in a similar league but unfortunately it's not.
A prescient newsreel style voiceover constitutes the narrative device of choice, putting its personal spin on events as it recounts the life of our doozy criminal, Virgil, a nerd turn notorious gangster. It is this wry commentary that lends the film its pseudo-documentary flavor, and the plot is pretty much a patchwork of such clips and thus not exactly awash with consistent humor. Certain scenes are pretty funny though, e.g., the protagonist's escape attempt at the prison that involved a bar of soap and some shoe polish, or a bizarre incident with a chain gang, etc.
For Allen fans, it's a no brainer: you'll see it anyway. For the rest of the viewers, I'd recommend giving other more polished comedies from Allen a try before you get to this erratic early-in-the-game cameo. It simply hasn't stood the test of time.
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Format: VHS Tape
Though I usually enjoy Woody Allen's more recent work, I'm one of many filmgoers whose heart still belongs to his earlier, anything-for-a-laugh, anarchistic comedies like Bananans, Sleeper, and this one. Take the Money And Run was Woody Allen's first real film to direct himself and it remains one of his funniest. Disguised as a documentary, this 1969 film tells the hilarious story of Virgil Starkweather, the world's most inept (if stupidly optomistic) thief. Like most of Woody Allen's early films, everything is played almost solely for the laughs it might provide and nearly forty years later, it all holds up very well. Lots of hilarious stuff in here (at times, this film is the funniest Mel Brooks film that Mel Brooks never made) but my personal favorite bits would have to include: Virgil's parents who disguise their indentities by wearing Groucho Marx glasses but will be familiar to anyone whose seen any of Allen's films, Virgil's attempt to rob a bank is foiled when none of the clerks can read his bad handwriting, another robbery goes wrong when a rival gang decides to rob the same bank at the same time, Virgil's attempt to escape from prison by making a fake gun out of soap is ruined when it starts to rain, the sight of Woody Allen on a southern chain gang (and being punished by being locked in the hole with an insurance salesman), and especially the scene where a man Virgil attempts to mug turns out to be not only a childhood school friend but an undercover cop as well. Directing with a wild-anything-goes-spirit, Woody Allen gives one of his first (and best) "born loser" performances as Virgil. Amongst all the madness, the film also presents a bizarrely sweet love story between Virgil and his wife, who is well-played by the lovely (and the sadly no longer with us) Janet Margolin.Read more ›
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