CDN$ 14.40
  • List Price: CDN$ 19.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.55 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 3 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Take Your Money and Run! Paperback – Feb 1 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.40
CDN$ 14.40 CDN$ 3.51

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Take Your Money and Run! + Tackling the Taxman: How to Keep the CRA from Controlling Your Investments and Your Life, A Tax Empowerment Guide + My Blue Haven: Revised Edition
Price For All Three: CDN$ 41.76

Some of these items ship sooner than the others. Show details


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 212 pages
  • Publisher: ECW Press; Revised edition edition (Feb. 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1550227718
  • ISBN-13: 978-1550227710
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 13.8 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 68 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By Stef on Dec 21 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It' good to see that there are ways to live better. Although the book is a little outdated and that the conditions to retire early are probably not as good now as they were some years ago, the author, through the use of a story, describes how we can all reduce our tax burden by having a foreign address...preferably somewhere in the Caribbean's!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Bill on Nov. 18 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found this book asumes quite a few numbers, such as 50% average income tax, 10% + bond return, and also suspect that a few things have changed since 1994 making it a little harder to take your RRSP outside the country with hardly any tax hit. The idea is great, but I found the book provided fewer answers than I expected.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 14 2005
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book a few years ago, and enjoy re-reading it every so often. It's not too lengthy and written in the form of a story similar to the style of writing used in the Wealthy Barber; only in this case you're learning how to become a person without a country of residence so as to avoid (very important-avoid- not evade) paying taxes on your hard earned wealth, and structure your affairs such that you control your wealth in a tax benign jurisdiction (e.g off-shore).
There are some really great stories of government waste and the voracious manner in which the tax department operates. My favourite is the one about the madame who paid income taxes on her brothel revenues dutifully and was then called to account by the tax man for the cases of whiskey required for bribery purposes that she declared as a business expense. Who knew the canadian government was living off the avails of prostitution!
He also explains the benefits of owning Bonds, and their relation to interest rates in a folksy kind of way that I found to be better than any economics/finance textbook I've had to use in my university cramming sessions.
Several key sections will benefit from a re-read to get a good feel for the author's tax avoidance structure.
The book is a bit dated now, and CRA has since implemented disclosure rules that attempt to minimize the loss of revenues from this type of asset structuring approach (e.g. declaration of any non-cdn assets over 100K)plus, they changed the treaty with Holland which had previously provided for a tax-free transfer of RRSP holdings to that country. The average tax bite to do so now is between 15 percent (Ireland) and 25 percent (most everywhere else.)
It's a fascinating read, and I'm not surprised that no-one's commented on it, for fear of ending up on some tax department's watch list-hence my anonimity! ; )
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback