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Tampopo [Import]


Price: CDN$ 80.77
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by M and N Media Canada.
2 new from CDN$ 80.77 4 used from CDN$ 24.99 1 collectible from CDN$ 117.01

Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this Movies & TV with Jiro Dreams of Sushi / Jiro rêve de sushi (Bilingual) (Sous-titres français) CDN$ 16.98

Tampopo [Import] + Jiro Dreams of Sushi / Jiro rêve de sushi (Bilingual) (Sous-titres français)
Price For Both: CDN$ 97.75

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Product Details

  • Actors: Ken Watanabe, Tsutomu Yamazaki, Nobuko Miyamoto, Kôji Yakusho, Rikiya Yasuoka
  • Directors: Jûzô Itami
  • Writers: Jûzô Itami
  • Producers: Jûzô Itami, Seigo Hosogoe, Yasushi Tamaoki
  • Format: Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: Japanese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Fox Lorber
  • Release Date: Nov. 24 1998
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305154880


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Zack Davisson on June 23 2004
Format: DVD
"Tampopo" is one of those rare films that just...works. Every piece of it is perfect, combining to form a more flavorful whole, like a well-made dish of ramen noodles. Itami was inspired for this film, and it is easily one of the best Japanese films ever made.
Japanese culture is filled with a love of food. Japanese travel brochures are filled, not with pretty sights and adventures, but with photos of local delicacies and dishes. Food questing is a popular hobby, with each person knowing a local favorite shop, or a master chef. Restaurants also tend to specialize, often serving only one dish such as ramen or udon noodles. "Tampopo" perfectly captured this national obsession, creating a story that is undeniable Japanese. Goro and Tampopo's search for the perfect broth, the most delicious way to cut meat and such is an honest and charming portrayal.
There is plenty going on in this film, with the sexual subplot of the gangster and his lover exchanging food and sex, or the young executive fluent in French cuisine. Each vignette forwards the tone. Along with this is the marriage of the samurai and the cowboy in the character of Goro, and the delicate strength of Tampopo herself.
You really can't go wrong with this film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ANT on May 24 2004
Format: DVD
It can be very difficult to describe this movie and what the premise or plot is. Oh, there is the central plot, make no mistake, but the entirity of the film is a flurry of sub-stories and vignettes that act like ingredients to the ever-present ramen (Japanese noodle soup) otherwise known as this brilliant gem out of Japan. The bottom line, the final product is a fancifal tale based around food and how our lives are encompassed by it, how we struggle with it, and most importantly how integral it is to human beings on the whole.
Tampopo also is an homage film to a few genres depending on the scene. For example, Goro (an obvious samurai reference) drives into town on a truck... with cow horns on the top! He wears the cowboy hat constantly and those themes are as thick as the noodles he's seeking out. There is also a tribute to Chaplin/Keaton and the silent comedies with one of the vagabonds in his efforts to make a rice omelette. There are a few mob movie shots as well, including the semi-narrator or guide of the man in the white suit. Beyond celebrating these genres, though, as well as film itself, this really is a story about food.
Tampopo is a widowed soup cook who can't really make soup. Ramen, one of the staple Japanese foods, is as varied and unique in stores throughout the town as there are chicken soup recipes in the US. She can't seem to make a good bowl, though, and Goro feeling bad for her, decides to stay on and help her out with the help of his sidekick Gun. Along the way, they pick up a colorful band of characters each with his own addition to the recipe and technique that helps Tampopo understand the importance of finding that perfect bowl of Ramen.
Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R Rheaume on April 5 2004
Format: DVD
I watched this one with a group of friends last night... it's been about 15 years since my first viewing and 8 since the last one. It's still brilliant, quirky and as enjoyable as ever.
A very John Wayne like truck driver plays noodle guru to a single mom struggling to be a master noodle chef. A whole host of characters are brought in to assist and some very unlikely types prove to have esoteric food knowledge. This is a quest for enlightenment in guise of perfect ramen.
The main story is broken by 2 and 3 minute glimpses into amusing (and at times bizarre) but totally unrelated stories revolving around food (with the food-sex connection illustrated vividly).
One of my favourite films.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tim Stopper on April 1 2004
Format: DVD
After one rental viewing, I had to own this hysterical, absurd parody of Japanese food, culture, and the American Western. From the beginning scene when a well-dressed connoisseur of food and film introduces the film - and rules of film etiquette - to the segue into the real "movie" with Goro, our hero, complete with cowboy hat and riding in his tanker truck, cab decorated on top with a pair of bull horns, this film celebrates everything it purports to, including Japanese food and film.
Goro decides to mentor Tampopo, the owner of a corner noodle stand in improving her apparently very sub-par soup. There ensues a montage of preparation and work-outs that could if been lifted straight from "Rocky."
Excellent scene, as well in which a group of homeless people review various 4 star restaurant establishments based on their leftovers. Genius.
A wider variety of cinematographic choices - close ups, approaching shots, and vaseline-lensed romance sequences - are almost characters in and of themselves, adding to the absurdity of Tampopo.
The sometimes meandering quality of the film gives us a wonderful window into the role of food in EVERY aspect of Japanese life.
The acting performances are solid. I can imagine the fun they had making "Tampopo".
Some of the funniest parts of the film are the references to various hack devices from American Westerns. The absurdity of a showdown over a bowl of Ramen noodles is brilliant.
I see funny new details everytime I view this film, and I plan to do so MANY more times.
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