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Tamsin Mass Market Paperback – Jun 21 2004


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Firebird; Reissue edition (June 21 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142401544
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142401545
  • Product Dimensions: 2.3 x 10.8 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 91 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #616,361 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
When I was really young, if there was one thing I wanted in the world, it was to be invisible. Read the first page
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By A Customer on Sept. 27 2003
Format: Paperback
I wanted a fun read and I had loved The Last Unicorn, so I was happy to find this book (in the Young Adult section, although it really should have been in Fantasy).
I couldn't put it down. I finished it in less than 24 hours, which was both good and bad - good because I really really wanted to see how it was going to end, but bad because the book is so slow and I got frustrated with it.
I would have adored this book when I was in jr high or high school. This would have been my favorite book then. I enjoyed it a lot now, but I did have some problems with it. For one thing, I see lots of reviewers here saying that it's not cliche. Well maybe you didn't read the same books I did, but I read a lot of young adult ghost stories back in the day, and this book follows the formula. It does it very well, yes, but it still follows the formula. Teenager forced against their will to move into a haunted house because a parent remarries, difficult time adjusting to new family, discovers a ghost with a tragic past, get information about the ghost from older, local people, etc. Wait Till Helen Comes for example (which is also a great young adult ghost story) has all of these cliches. So does The Headless Cupid (also excellent). Tamsin is excellent and worth reading, but the formula is there and is obvious if you've seen it before.
I don't want to be too negative, because this really is a good book, and I enjoyed it a lot. I adored Mister Cat! The house itself was creepy and I would have enjoyed more time spent to exploring it (and perhaps less time devoted to Tamsin almost - but then not - telling Jenny things).
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Format: Paperback
Jenny delivers an account of her move to Dorset England after her mother's remarriage to a farming soil expert, which results in her acquaintence of many supernatural creatures such as bogarts, pookas and a billy. She slowly becomes friends with the ghost of their residence, a 300 year old apparition named Tamsin, who can't remember what she has to do to be freed from this earth. Jenny picks up her story in bits and pieces, revealling that the ghostly Wild Hunt passes over frequently.
Although the start is slow, the writing is tantalizing -- Jenny, now 19, is writing down the events and talking to herself and the reader as she goes along, and as she tries to set the stage and not get ahead of herself, the reader is hooked, trying to figure out exactly what is going on. This lends a disturbingly realistic feel to the plot, and makes the reader believe that those long ago myths are entirely possible today.
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Format: Paperback
I am a long-time fantasy lover -- adore the novels of Ursula Le Guin and Terry Pratchett -- but the people in TAMSIN are more gullible than intelligent, falling too quickly into belief in boggarts, ghosts, and billy-blinds. You can forgive the children, but the adults, too? They probably believe in Santa and the Easter Bunny. Their stupidity eroded the novel's verisimilitude and is personally irritating to me. Gullible sympathetic chacters are unwelcome in our sad era of New Age and Fundamentalist nonsense, when far too many people...have lost the commonsense ability to be skeptical.
That cavil aside, once you accept that the characters aren't really very bright, this is a truly well-written and sensitive fantasy, with astonishing insights into the concerns and teenage girls...Furthermore, TAMSIN warmed the heart of this old medievalist. It deals intimately with one of the crucial periods in history, the English Seventeenth Century--and reminds us why England had its Glorious Revolution and Bill of Rights, and why we must stalwartly defend our Constitution and our even better American Bill of Rights...
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By "grograman" on March 10 2003
Format: Paperback
I think this could be a true story. Really, I wouldn't be shocked at all is Beagle told me that he'd simply written down a story he overheard one day. Even with the ghosts, bogarts, and that loveable Pooka, you'll feel as if you are reading the true account of a displaced city teen who discovers a home in rural England among the "old weird." Although not as good as some of Beagle's earlier works, such as A Fine and Private Place and The Last Unicorn, Tamsin still has that feel about it that is uniquely Beagle! The dialogue comes to life, especially when it is spoken by one of the old Dorset ghosts. You can hear the accent when you read it! One of the working titles for Tamsin was "Friends in the Night," so I recommend reading it after sundown for an especially effective experience.
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By S. Waters on Feb. 25 2003
Format: Paperback
This is the first book I've read by Beagle. It won't be the last. This story is like a train, starting off slowly...building...building...continually gaining momentum. It is very well written, so even in the beginning before all the action takes place, you don't want to put it down. Beagle sucks you into Jenny's life, and even though the story is so bazaar, you believe it!
This is a mysterious, almost creepy, story. I hated to put it down, and when I had to, I kept thinking about it! It's easy to read, and with his amazing descriptions and interesting characters and twists, it's a great read for anyone over the age of 10.
I highly recommend it for anyone interested in a mysterious ghost story.
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