A Tan and Sandy Silence: A Travis McGee Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

A Tan and Sandy Silence Audio Cassette – Audiobook, Apr 6 1993


See all 33 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Cassette, Audiobook, Apr 6 1993
CDN$ 26.16
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please, the eagerly anticipated first book from Amy Poehler, the Golden Globe winning star of Parks and Recreation, is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Random House Audio (April 6 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394559835
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394559834
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 10.8 x 18.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Product Description

Review

Praise for John D. MacDonald and the Travis McGee novels
 
The great entertainer of our age, and a mesmerizing storyteller.”—Stephen King
 
“My favorite novelist of all time . . . All I ever wanted was to touch readers as powerfully as John D. MacDonald touched me. No price could be placed on the enormous pleasure that his books have given me. He captured the mood and the spirit of his times more accurately, more hauntingly, than any ‘literature’ writer—yet managed always to tell a thunderingly good, intensely suspenseful tale.”—Dean Koontz
 
“To diggers a thousand years from now, the works of John D. MacDonald would be a treasure on the order of the tomb of Tutankhamen.”—Kurt Vonnegut
 
“A master storyteller, a masterful suspense writer . . . John D. MacDonald is a shining example for all of us in the field. Talk about the best.”—Mary Higgins Clark
 
“A dominant influence on writers crafting the continuing series character . . . I envy the generation of readers just discovering Travis McGee, and count myself among the many readers savoring his adventures again.”—Sue Grafton
 
“One of the great sagas in American fiction.”—Robert B. Parker
 
“Most readers loved MacDonald’s work because he told a rip-roaring yarn. I loved it because he was the first modern writer to nail Florida dead-center, to capture all its languid sleaze, racy sense of promise, and breath-grabbing beauty.”—Carl Hiaasen
 
“The consummate pro, a master storyteller and witty observer . . . John D. MacDonald created a staggering quantity of wonderful books, each rich with characterization, suspense, and an almost intoxicating sense of place. The Travis McGee novels are among the finest works of fiction ever penned by an American author and they retain a remarkable sense of freshness.”—Jonathan Kellerman
 
“What a joy that these timeless and treasured novels are available again.”—Ed McBain
 
“Travis McGee is the last of the great knights-errant: honorable, sensual, skillful, and tough. I can’t think of anyone who has replaced him. I can’t think of anyone who would dare.”—Donald Westlake
 
“There’s only one thing as good as reading a John D. MacDonald novel: reading it again. A writer way ahead of his time, his Travis McGee books are as entertaining, insightful, and suspenseful today as the moment I first read them. He is the all-time master of the American mystery novel.”—John Saul --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

John D. MacDonald (1916-1986) MacDonald was born in Sharon, Pa, and educated at the Universities of Pennsylvania, Syracuse and Harvard, where he took an MBA in 1939. After war service in the Far East he wrote hundreds of stories for the pulps and over seventy novels, including the 21 in the Travis McGee sequence. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Another Travis McGee book. This one seemed to take forever to get going, to set up the problem, and then as soon as you understood the problem, MacDonald popped you a good one, and the rest of the book was a catch-up from that moment. But that's the simple "mystery" of this McGee novel, and as such is never that special. The attraction of McGee, at least in these later books, are MacDonald's comments within them on the human condition, both specifically with regard to the Quixotish nature of McGee, as well as a general feeling of malaise which centers around money and violence. The McGee novels are as much about philosophy--ethics, particularly--as they are about mystery. Or maybe the point is that the philosophy is the mystery, and as we get to know McGee better, we understand more about his philosophy. I seem to remember the Spenser novels of Robert Parker to be similar to this as well. Are there other mystery series in which the character growth is as important, if not more so, than the particular story of the time?
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was my fourth or fifth Travis McGee novel, and I have to say I was a little disappointed. Don't get me wrong, MacDonald is still MacDonald and the book is well written and engaging, but I thought overall "Tan and Sandy Silence" was lacking somehow. Maybe it's that this is obviously one of his later books and he was getting bored or tired, or maybe it's just something I didn't notice in his other books, but he seemed to take the easy way out a few times. For instance, when McGee interviews people the conversations don't seem realistic--the people volunteer too much information: If you just met someone and they asked what you knew about your next-door neighbor would you say, "Well, not a lot other than she just opened an account at the Blah-Blah Bank and her loan officer is John Blah"? (How convenient!) Also, there was an element of predictability that may have come from reading his other books; I knew certain characters were going to die, and even is one or two instances HOW they would die. Some of McGee's encounters seemed too coincidental and lucky, with old friends showing up at just the right time and place to save his skin. Finally, the ending appeared rushed and illogical and didn't tie up all the loose ends.
But even with all that, there was enough fun and suspense and McGee-ism to make this a worthwhile read. You could certainly do far worse.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Veejer on March 14 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Over the years I've read hundreds of novels in a variety of genres, but for pure fun and enjoyment it's hard to beat Travis McGee. Some of the books are better than others, but they're nearly all worth a couple of lazy summer days. They are the ultimate summer time, quick-read beach books. At their core, they're good mysteries. But Travis McGee is such a great character, with such a wry outlook on life, that often the mystery seems secondary to McGee's views on whatever topic author John D. McDonald has selected for his soap box. Most of them take place in Florida, (a Florida no one will ever see again given they were written mostly in the 60s and 70s) and all have a color in the title. Don't take them too seriously, just have fun in the sun.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If this was your first Travis McGee book, don't worry. Most of them are much, much better. This book suffers from an overload of the author's rambling commentary on society. After the introduction to jealous husband, you have to slug through 100 pages before you begin to get into typical Travis McGee action. The action is often illogical, and too often Travis - err - Gavin stumbles into old friends at the most unlikely places, bailing him out of trouble. Sorry, this one just didn't click for me. In many ways, it reminded me of the Pale Gray for Guilt story, but there was much less action in this book.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 42 reviews
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Not quite up to snuff May 1 2000
By Robert Schiller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was my fourth or fifth Travis McGee novel, and I have to say I was a little disappointed. Don't get me wrong, MacDonald is still MacDonald and the book is well written and engaging, but I thought overall "Tan and Sandy Silence" was lacking somehow. Maybe it's that this is obviously one of his later books and he was getting bored or tired, or maybe it's just something I didn't notice in his other books, but he seemed to take the easy way out a few times. For instance, when McGee interviews people the conversations don't seem realistic--the people volunteer too much information: If you just met someone and they asked what you knew about your next-door neighbor would you say, "Well, not a lot other than she just opened an account at the Blah-Blah Bank and her loan officer is John Blah"? (How convenient!) Also, there was an element of predictability that may have come from reading his other books; I knew certain characters were going to die, and even is one or two instances HOW they would die. Some of McGee's encounters seemed too coincidental and lucky, with old friends showing up at just the right time and place to save his skin. Finally, the ending appeared rushed and illogical and didn't tie up all the loose ends.
But even with all that, there was enough fun and suspense and McGee-ism to make this a worthwhile read. You could certainly do far worse.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Fun in the sun March 14 2002
By Veejer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Over the years I've read hundreds of novels in a variety of genres, but for pure fun and enjoyment it's hard to beat Travis McGee. Some of the books are better than others, but they're nearly all worth a couple of lazy summer days. They are the ultimate summer time, quick-read beach books. At their core, they're good mysteries. But Travis McGee is such a great character, with such a wry outlook on life, that often the mystery seems secondary to McGee's views on whatever topic author John D. McDonald has selected for his soap box. Most of them take place in Florida, (a Florida no one will ever see again given they were written mostly in the 60s and 70s) and all have a color in the title. Don't take them too seriously, just have fun in the sun.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Love it or hate it, you will not forget it. June 11 2008
By Michael G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A Tan and Sandy Silence is certainly not the best book John D. MacDonald ever authored. In fact, some may find it way too dark and unsettingly disturbing. Others may object to it for a host of very legitimate reasons. But I daresay that even those readers who find themselves hating this Travis McGee novel still will have to admit it is a substantive, unforgettable read.
The unevenly paced narrative revolves around McGee's efforts to locate Mary Broll, a former lover whom no one seems to have seen in over three months. His search takes him to the tropical island of Grenada where the case takes on an entirely different trajectory. As others have already accurately pointed out, the novel starts off slow, climaxes with some very macabre events and has somewhat of a rushed ending. Along the way, the reader is treated to large helpings of Travis McGee's introspection on a wide range of topics having to do with modern life. After a while, this inner monologue, though at times clever, becomes tiresome and gives the impression of too much self-indulgence on author MacDonald's part.
Other objectionable aspects of this book include its incorporation of an excessive amount of amateur psychology into the plot and the fact that McGee never, ever fails to completely captivate members of the opposite sex.
The positive attributes of this book would have to include MacDonald's very evocative and original brand of prose and the presence of a number of characters who come off as quite believable.
John D. MacDonald was unquestionably a great writer, but A Tan and Sandy Silence is one of his lesser works. He was capable of much better.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
McGee and the Missing Lady Jan. 16 2012
By mrliteral - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Would there be a Carl Hiaasen, Tim Dorsey or Randy Wayne White without John D. MacDonald? Maybe, but it's not too difficult to find a dozen authors who owe a debt to MacDonald, who pioneered the Florida crime novel. Of course, it's one thing to be a pioneer, it's another to be good. Happily, MacDonald is both, as most aptly demonstrated in his Travis McGee series.

A Tan and Sandy Silence is the 13th in the series. It opens with McGee doing what he likes most, enjoying life on his houseboat, the Busted Flush. All is well till he is visited by Harry Broll, the boorish husband of McGee's old friend Mary Dillon. Mary walked out on Harry three months back after catching him with another woman. Broll is convinced McGee is hiding her. Broll is not so much interested in reconciliation as getting Mary to complete some paperwork essential to an investment.

McGee isn't hiding Mary, but he's also a little worried that she never contacted him. A bit of investigating eventually points to her hiding out on the island of Grenada (giving the island a drop of notoriety a decade before Reagan put it on the map with a minor military adventure). He still has enough doubts to go there, where he will find out about a scheme to deprive Broll of a lot of cash. At the heart of it is a typical MacDonald villain, an intelligent sociopath who McGee will underestimate.

This is another fun thriller with the usual share of Travis McGee cynicism about society that sets it apart from other novels of the era. MacDonald was a great storyteller, and this book, even if not the strongest in the set, is still good enough for any mystery fan.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Phoned in McGee Feb. 11 2012
By David C. Read - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read all but one of the Travis McGee novels, and this is the only one that felt like John D. was just going through the motions. I think he was burned out, and it really shows. He was too prolific to maintain high quality. This was the 13th book in an 8 year span (in addition to several non-McGee novels); by contrast, the last 8 books in the series are spread out over 14 years, which helped MacDonald keep the quality high.

I can understand why MacDonald need to write this book: so he could write off the cost of a trip to Grenada (a small island in the southern Caribbean that President Reagan later made famous by liberating it from a Marxist dictatorship). But I cannot recommend that anyone read it.

There's stuff in here that wouldn't have made it into a James Bond film even during the Roger Moore years, like McGee floating out to sea on a rip tide and being picked up by a sailing yacht/floating bordello crewed by beautiful naked young ladies. But no need to detail all of the nonsense in this book. Suffice it to say that no one hits a home run every time at bat. The series as a whole is still great stuff.


Feedback