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Tarzan: The Greystoke Legacy Paperback – Jul 26 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Faber And Faber Juvenile (July 26 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 057127238X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571272389
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 19.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 222 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #387,669 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was very impressed with this new and updated version of the story of Tarzan, which is quite different in the actual books from what pop culture tends to portray. The update to the 21st century actually worked very well. Tarzan isn't softened into merely a wild environmental activist; he's still very much the king of the jungle and the book opens with his killing of three poachers. I liked that he is raised by gorillas (a good choice also made by Disney), as ERB's "mangani" are rather unbelievable in a modern context. Jane is a believable modern young woman, capable of much more than she thinks, and changing the stereotypical Esmeralda the black servant to Esmee the Congolese teacher was a great improvement. I wish D'Arnot (updated in this version to a French UN peacekeeper) hadn't died by the time the story takes place, as I would have loved to read about him teaching Tarzan to speak. Maybe we could get a flashback in a sequel? This book might be targeted at tween and teen readers, but for my money it's a much better retelling of Tarzan's story than Robin Maxwell's "Jane" which I recently read as well.
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By Brewski2010 on Aug. 21 2011
Format: Paperback
I have been a Tarzan fan for over 45 years, and I was skeptical when I first heard of this project. True this book is for juveniles, but I think the spirit of Tarzan is captured here. The Tarzan character is not developed too much in this book, but we are given some interesting glimpses of Tarzan's character and I am sure with time, we will see more of the Ape man we know and love.
I do agree that D'arnot should have had a bigger part in the story to help Tarzan cope with civilization. He played a large and much needed roll in Tarzan's life. Looking forward to the next book in the series.
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Format: Paperback
Recommended only for avid Burrough's collectors. Written for juveniles it is more reminiscent of the Weismuller/MGM movies than a legitimate effort to contribute to the Burroughs Tarzan legacy.If the author, Andy Briggs, continues the series with with more of the style, pace and imagination of E.R.B. it could develope into someting more worthy of the Burroughs tradition.

FO
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By kythera on Aug. 15 2011
Format: Paperback
I have been a fan of the Edgar Rice Burroughs character, Tarzan, since I was able to read. Andy Briggs has given new life into this character. We see a more feral Tarzan, one who is on the brink of discovering his human side. I regret that D'arnot is not around to guide Tarzan in this transition. Tarzan needs a "male best friend" to help him face the intricacies of civilization. In the original books, D'arnot was always there for him. Jane is now a gutsy, self-assured young lady who learns to "fly through the trees", becomes integrated with the Great Ape family, and learns to see Africa through Tarzan's eyes. Briggs' writing style equals, and in some ways surpasses ERB (never thought I'd be able to write that), because he doesn't preach about the evils of civilization. Briggs uses his characters and the plot to depict the consequences of denuding the forest for lumber of all life in the jungle. Tarzan stands for the preservation (of his environment and that of his ape family) while the loggers (including Jane's father) stand for the illegal profit they will make regardless of the harm they are doing. Jane is caught in the middle between her father (civilization) and Tarzan (preservation). I expect there will be a be a Book 2 to have Tarzan face civilization as a human, to have Tarzan to find out the power of money and how to use it to save his environment, and to conclude the blooming romance between Tarzan and Jane. There is a hint there will be a follow-up story when Jane tells her father and the others that Tarzan has a huge inheritance with a noble title to be claimed in England and her father and his associate look meaningfully at each other... More to come!
Excellent book that revives the Tarzan character in a more realistic manner without taking away from the original books.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
The Dumbing Down of TARZAN Jan. 30 2012
By Blueseasons - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a child growing up I became fascinated by the TARZAN movies starring Johnny Weissmuller. As I got older I discovered the books. When I read the books it was Johnny's face that I saw on the character that I was reading about. Within me I struggled, trying to decide which version of the character was more real to me. While I can still watch the movies the obvious limitations of 1930's special effects and Hollywood back lot sets detract from the adventure and realism. I guess that's the difference between seeing life through the eyes as a grown man vs. those of a child. So for me it is the written word of the legend that endures as I occasionally read one of the original books for a second, third or even forth time.

Having had admitted that I have been a lifelong TARZAN fan it was with great expectations and excitement that I looked forward to this new installment given it was written in honor of the TARZANs 100th birthday.

This book is a very simplistic tale that reads like a bad B movie or TV show designed for children. I found it less than a retelling or a updating and more of an over simplification. I struggled to finish the book and hardly recognized the main character as the man that I once knew. It was hard to see Johnny's face this TARZAN, maybe George Clooney? I hope not. And this TARZAN treats his jungle animal's more as his pets than his equals. NUMA meant "lion" in the ERB books. In this book, NUMA is the name of a lion. And so it was throughout this book with SHEETA and TANTOR as well. Matching TARZAN up with a tribe of Gorillas instead of great apes of an unknown species is unforgiveable. I know these weren't mistakes, but this book so radically departs from the original it is almost impossible to believe that we are reading about the same man.

The story and revision does not do the main character justice and does nothing to bring him into the 21st century to a new generation of believers. I think in general the public has grown tired of this once magnificent character and this rendition will do nothing to change that whether it be child, teen or adult.

For me there will be no better TARZAN of the movies than Johnny Weissmuller and there will be no better author than ERB. I sincerely hope that this book and rendition of the character will not be the basis for another movie. I fear it will not do very well if it is. I am very disappointed and concerned that a great opportunity has been missed by the ERB dynasty.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
This is NOT Tarzan, sad to say. Feb. 14 2012
By D. Keller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a friend told about something else - "Why did I rate it a 1? Because I couldn't go any lower". Boy does that description fit this book. I am a huge fan of Tarzan and to even put his name on this book is an insult. It claims to be a modernization of the story, but its more of a complete raping of the story and the characters. I honestly can NOT believe the Burroughs Foundation approved this horrible portrayal.
None of the characters have their characteristics as set up by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Everything is different and nothing happens at all like the original. I'm actually sorry I bothered getting this travesty. Please don't make the same mistake
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Lost Opportunity March 23 2012
By Kermit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sorry to report that after much anticipation, this is a lost opportunity and a really disappointing offering. Like a bad reboot movie of 1960's vintage, this misses the mark in almost every category; faithfulness to the canon, lack of depth in character and story arc, weak writing, and a shallow understanding of what makes the original so compelling. This is the Bo Derick version of Tarzan and it does not deserve to be included under the iconic canon.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Good update and retelling of the Tarzan story Nov. 23 2012
By October15 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was very impressed with this new and updated version of the story of Tarzan, which is quite different in the actual books from what pop culture tends to portray. The update to the 21st century actually worked very well. Tarzan isn't softened into merely a wild environmental activist; he's still very much the king of the jungle and the book opens with his killing of three poachers. I liked that he is raised by gorillas (a good choice also made by Disney), as ERB's "mangani" are rather unbelievable in a modern context. Jane is a believable modern young woman, capable of much more than she thinks, and changing the stereotypical Esmeralda the black servant to Esmee the Congolese teacher was a great improvement. I wish D'Arnot (updated in this version to a French UN peacekeeper) hadn't died by the time the story takes place, as I would have loved to read about him teaching Tarzan to speak. Maybe we could get a flashback in a sequel? This book might be targeted at tween and teen readers, but for my money it's a much better retelling of Tarzan's story than Robin Maxwell's "Jane" which I recently read as well.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Tarzan for a new Generation Oct. 16 2012
By Brewski2010 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
First of all let me say that this book was not written for long time Tarzan fans. It was written for younger readers. Andy hopes to get them interested in the Tarzan character so that the ERB Tarzan stories may live on. If kids read his books and become fascinated by the Tarzan character as many of us were in our youth, than hopefully they will go on to read Edgar Rice Burroughs' wonderful books. Of course it isn't ERB's Tarzan. This is 100 years later. It's a different time and a different world. Kids are very different too and a character in a book has to relate to their world if they are going to be interested in it. All that being said, there was a lot I liked about the book. It is not too Politically Correct. Tarzan has not been turned into some Vegetarian tree-hugger as he has been by some authors and TV shows. He kills his prey and eats it raw. He is loyal to his family and friends and fights to protect their homes. I think Andy has done a great job and I hope he is successful in his efforts.

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