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Tay John [Mass Market Paperback]

Howard O'Hagan , Michael Ondaatje
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

March 1 1989 New Canadian Library (Book 105)
The awesome terrain of the Rocky Mountains is the setting for this extraordinary novel about a heroic man who boldly defies destiny. Tay John, a messianic halfbreed, is fated to lead his people to their Promised Land. In a rebellious act of will, he turns to the mountains to seek his own truths.

This richly populated novel vividly depicts the exotic and rootless people who wound their way to the Canadian Northwest. It is a powerful modern legend that ranges over all aspects of the human heart and mind, incorporating passion and hatred, tragedy and triumph.

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About the Author

Howard O’Hagan was born in Lethbridge, Alberta, in 1902. As a young man, he worked on survey parties in the Rockies before moving to Montreal to study law at McGill University. After practising law for a brief time, he returned to western Canada to work as a tour guide in Banff National Park.

Stephen Leacock helped O’Hagan obtain employment with the Canadian Pacific Railroad recruiting farm labourers from England. He also worked for the Canadian National Railroad in Jasper and in New York and for the Argentine National Railroad in Buenos Aires.

While living in San Francisco in the thirties, O’Hagan began a series of sketches of guides, mountain men, and trappers that formed the background for his novel Tay John (1939), which he completed on an island in Howe Sound on the British Columbia coast.

One of the first western Canadians to make a major contribution to Canadian literature, O’Hagan found occasional work in the fifties as a journalist in Victoria, British Columbia, and as a labourer on the waterfront and on survey crews.

In 1963 O’Hagan moved to Sicily, where he lived for more than a decade. He returned to Victoria in 1974.

Howard O’Hagan died in Victoria in 1982.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

One

The time of this in its beginning, in men’s time, is 1880 in the summer, and its place is the Athabaska valley, near its head in the mountains, and along the other waters falling into it, and beyond them a bit, over Yellowhead Pass to the westward, where the Fraser, rising in a lake, flows through wilderness and canyon down to the Pacific.

In those days Canada was without a railway across the mountains. The Canadian Pacific was being built, but it was not till 1885 that the first train steamed over its rails to reach tidewater at Port Moody. Its crossing of the Rocky Mountains was by Kicking Horse Pass, more than two hundred miles to the south of Yellowhead. So that it might be built and that men might gain money from its building, Canada was made a dominion. British Columbia, a colony of England, became the most western province of the territory now stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

In time another railway was built. It was called the Grand Trunk Pacific, and passed through the mountains at Yellowhead. That was in 1911.

Until that happened the country around Yellowhead and on the headwaters of the Athabaska, the Arctic’s most southern slope, was little changed from what it had always been. It was a game country, and men found meat when they travelled. In the summer the days were long and the nights only brief twilight between the sun’s setting and rising. Pine- and fir-trees grew in the valleys, and good grass on the flats and benches; and higher on the mountain slopes, close to the rock and snow, spruce and balsam. Poplar, birch and alder, and tall willows grew in the river bottoms; and everywhere was the sound of running water. In the winters the nights were long. Streams and lakes were frozen. Frost split trees. The wind blew up the Athabaska from the north, and blizzards rose in the valley. Still, sometimes it would be quiet, with the sun shining, and then a man’s voice talking could be heard two miles away across the snow.

For a long time fur brigades from Hudson Bay and Fort Garry on the prairies travelled the Athabaska valley. They used horses in the summer and dog-teams in the winter. At first they followed the river to its head, and at the Committee’s Punchbowl met those who had come up from the Columbia river valley with beaver skins. For these they exchanged rum and leather and pemmican and came back with the fur eastward. When the lower Columbia valley turned to the Americans and became part of their nation, the brigades swung out of the Athabaska lower down and crossed the mountains at Yellowhead Pass to trade with the Indians and white trappers along the Fraser as far down as Fort Prince George. In time the people around Fort Prince George began to send their furs out by the new Cariboo road to the Pacific, and fur brigades then ceased to travel through the Athabaska valley. The posts they had built in good places where there was game and fish, feed for their horses, and wood for their fires, were no longer used. Their roofs caved in under the snow, and wind blew the moss chinking from between the logs that walled them. Grass grew in the ruts of the trails. Along the trails “blazes,” filled with yellow pitch, burned into the tree bark with no one to see them, like lanterns left and forgotten.

In 1880 one man remained by the Athabaska river where it flowed through the mountains. He was tall, fair-haired and fair-bearded, and his blue eyes, stung with the snow, streamed with water when he stood outside and faced the sun. He lived in a cabin on a point above the river where the trail leaves it to follow the Miette to Yellowhead Pass. He trapped and hunted, and traded with bands of wandering Indians. Once a year, in the spring, he took his furs eastward out of the mountains by pack-horse to Edmonton. He was named Red Rorty, and was thought by himself and some others to be a strong man because sometimes on a still day he could be heard shouting from five miles off. He shouted at his horses when they were hard to catch, or at an Indian who had brought poor furs to trade. At other times he would shout when there was nothing to shout for, and would listen and smile when the mountains hurled his voice — rolled it from one rock wall to another, until it seemed he heard bands of men, loosed above him, calling one to another as they climbed farther and higher into the rock and ice.

Much alone, he was given to hearing strange sounds and to seeing a tree far off as a man, or a bunch of trees down the valley from his cabin as a group of men advancing towards him. So that he could see better what was around him and that no one might come upon him unawares, he had made a wide clearing around his cabin, which he kept free of willows and all bush tending to grow there. A pine-tree on the edge of the clearing, ninety yards from his door, was marked with lead from his rifle because of the times in the moonlight he had looked out and thought he saw it moving before him.

His cabin — tidy, with hard earth for its floor — held a stove, a table, a bed, and a bench to sit on. Pack-saddles, bridles, and blankets were hung by its door under the eaves. Its logs were white-washed, so that it gleamed against his eyes from far off when he returned from hunting.

Red Rorty was the first son of many born on a homestead in Bruce County in Ontario. He came west when he was young and worked on the land near Fort Carry. After a while he got a job wrangling horses on a party sent out to the mountains to line the rivers into the contours of the land. When the party disbanded at Edmonton he returned to the Athabaska valley with four horses and the money he had saved, and built himself a cabin — for of all the country he had seen he liked it the best.


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VERY Hard to Describe March 6 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Howard O'Hagan is, with great regret, an obscurity floating against the distant shores of the literary canon. The first strike against him may be that he was Canadian. Canadian authors always seem segregated from the rest of literature, relegated to the dim recesses of academia or a dusty shelf at the local library. The only Canadian authors who receive some recognition are Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro, and even they are hardly household names. Perhaps this ignorance towards Canadian literature stems from Canada's position in respect to the United States, that Canada just does not have as much to offer the world because of its location next to a global entertainment powerhouse. I am writing to tell you this is not the case: Canadians produced, and continue to produce, a richly diverse body of literature. O'Hagan's novel "Tay John" stands as proof of this wonderful richness. Set in late 19th and early 20th century Canada, "Tay John" tells the story of an Indian messiah of enigmatic origins as he moves through the vastness of the Canadian West.
The novel breaks down into three parts: the first reads like an Indian story, outlining the birth and destiny of Tay John (an anglicized name taken from Tete Jaune, or Yellow Head, referring to Tay John's mane of yellow hair). In this section, O'Hagan explains that Tay John is the offspring of Red Rorty, a white trapper on a religious crusade, and Hanni, a Shuswap Indian he beds while living among the tribe. The result of this union is Kumkleseem (Tay John), a yellow haired youth destined to become a leader who will lead the Shuswaps to a promised land of great plenty.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VERY Hard to Describe March 6 2003
By Jeffrey Leach - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Howard O'Hagan is, with great regret, an obscurity floating against the distant shores of the literary canon. The first strike against him may be that he was Canadian. Canadian authors always seem segregated from the rest of literature, relegated to the dim recesses of academia or a dusty shelf at the local library. The only Canadian authors who receive some recognition are Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro, and even they are hardly household names. Perhaps this ignorance towards Canadian literature stems from Canada's position in respect to the United States, that Canada just does not have as much to offer the world because of its location next to a global entertainment powerhouse. I am writing to tell you this is not the case: Canadians produced, and continue to produce, a richly diverse body of literature. O'Hagan's novel "Tay John" stands as proof of this wonderful richness. Set in late 19th and early 20th century Canada, "Tay John" tells the story of an Indian messiah of enigmatic origins as he moves through the vastness of the Canadian West.
The novel breaks down into three parts: the first reads like an Indian story, outlining the birth and destiny of Tay John (an anglicized name taken from Tete Jaune, or Yellow Head, referring to Tay John's mane of yellow hair). In this section, O'Hagan explains that Tay John is the offspring of Red Rorty, a white trapper on a religious crusade, and Hanni, a Shuswap Indian he beds while living among the tribe. The result of this union is Kumkleseem (Tay John), a yellow haired youth destined to become a leader who will lead the Shuswaps to a promised land of great plenty.
O'Hagan makes a jarring transformation with the second and third sections of the book, bringing in narrator Jack Denham, a wanderer who tells any one who listens about this strange character named Tay John. Denham relates a tale about watching Tay John fight a grizzly bear, about a card game gone horribly wrong, a couple trekking into the mountains of the West with Tay John as guide, and a story about a developer building a resort along the expanding railway system. Tay John is the central character in all of these anecdotes even though he has little dialogue in any of them. That is the beauty of this book: O'Hagan lets events speak for themselves through action.
This minimalist approach fits in with the landscape of the novel. The author introduces the reader to the rugged terrains of Western Canada, where mountains, rivers, and wide spaces serve not just as background but also as characters in the sweep of the story. Against this awesome backdrop move the human characters, living out their lives in the shadow of mother earth. O'Hagan makes you feel the smallness of humanity by elevating every mundane action into an act of overwhelming importance. This makes the story severely realistic, as people living in a land where humans are scare would tend to treat interactions with others as larger than life events.
The afterword by Michael Onjaatje is of great assistance in understanding O'Hagan's book. Onjaatje explains that "Tay John" was one of the first examples of mythic realism in Canadian literature. The story, explains Onjaatje, shows how a myth of an Indian messiah is made into a legend in the real world. Looking at the book with a view of Canadian history, I did not notice the myth/legend aspects as much as I noticed the parade of archetypal figures through the Canadian West: first the Indians, then some white travelers, then the railroad and a developer. You can trace the history of Western Canada just by reading this book.
Ultimately, words fail to describe this deeply philosophical piece of literature. The only way to fathom the beauty and majesty of this book is to sit down and read it. Regrettably, Howard O'Hagan only wrote two other books and an autobiography before his death. After reading "Tay John," it is obvious that he had the talent to do more work. This is one of those books that will stay with you long after you read it. Hopefully, it will receive more attention in the future.
5.0 out of 5 stars A gem too easily forgotten Dec 15 2004
By monkey mind - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This novel may seem unpolished and unsophisticated on the surface, but the beauty of it is how it deals with lofty, obscure themes in an easily understood, down to earth manner. Another wonderful aspect of the novel is the way it betrays the readers expectations throughout; meaning that the less said about the plot ahead of time the better. The setting of the novel, in O'Hagan's hand's, is absolutely intergral to the story and if I ever need a trip to the mountains but don't have the time for the drive I know I can always pick up this book.

Furthermore, I find the NCL series of books from McClelland and Stewart to be top notch paperbacks.
5.0 out of 5 stars Canada must acknowledge its literary accoplishments Feb. 25 2004
By Jared Robinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
If ever you feel indignation, read this book, think twice, then go out to your garage and hold an axe up to your wrist. If you feel that your "being" has been stretched as far Tay John's has, than swing away. Otherwise, shut up and stop feeling sorry for yourself.
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