Teaching As a Subversive Activity and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Teaching As a Subversive Activity on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Teaching As a Subversive Activity [Paperback]

Neil Postman
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 22.00
Price: CDN$ 15.88 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 6.12 (28%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Friday, August 29? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $15.88  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

July 15 1971 Delta Book
A no-holds-barred assault on outdated teaching methods--with dramatic and practical proposals on how education can be made relevant to today's world.

Frequently Bought Together

Teaching As a Subversive Activity + The End of Education: Redefining the Value of School + Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business
Price For All Three: CDN$ 41.83


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
"IN 1492, COLUMBUS DISCOVERED AMERICA. . . ." Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The effect of this book is long term. Feb. 3 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I first read this book in 1972 when I was in undergraduate school and it was "news." It still affects how I think about teaching / learning to this day.
Using the truths found in Postman's book will help foster a fundamental change in the way our children learn - a change which could (literally) change the world for the better - one person at a time. It is as fresh today as when it was written and whether you are a student or a teacher - I recommend you find a copy and read it NOW.
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book is easily within the five best books I ever read. I read it through maybe 15 times. It helped explain to me my 12 years of school - what actually went on there. It has highly provocative ideas concerning what goes on in school. It still help guides me in my advanced and home studies. Highly recommended for all students, and teachers. A very good read for all who are not brain dead. I am not a teacher
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars The more things change... Oct. 3 2011
Format:Paperback
Heard of this book via a mentor (from the era) who described it as "her Bible". I am only into the second chapter but am struck by how the malaise of the era has not really shifted (did the 60's get co-opted?) and am also struck by how the foundation of their arguments are still applicable today.
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The effect of this book is long term. Feb. 3 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I first read this book in 1972 when I was in undergraduate school and it was "news." It still affects how I think about teaching / learning to this day.
Useing the truths found in Postman's book will help foster a fundamental change in the way our children learn - a change which could (literally) change the world for the better - one person at a time. It is as fresh today as when it was written and whether you are a student or a teacher - I recommend you find a copy and read it NOW.
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's way too difficult to understand Nov. 21 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
He says there is a need for better education, and I have no doubt in my mind that there must be a good reason for teachers to reform schools, or else, this could not still be relevant today.
But, there must also be a new way of perceiving things. I guess he needed to quantify an understanding of how things must be ingratiated into a person's life so as to be relative to their causal needs--
But let's stop for a second. Isn't this getting a bit too complicated for the purposes of a school with very little to teach but what's gone on in the teacher's mind the previous night?
I myself went to school, and had to drop out. There was no need for me to go back anyway. Many times I wanted to go deep--really deep--into something that astounded me, but time ran out. I was often left irritated with a void that had faded into the outer world, including everything that may have been there to begin with.
Several weeks passed after I fell out of the old high school system. I wandered into alternative schools and ended up hiring a tutor, taking several tests (forgiving myself kindly that there was no measured place for me to go), and finding not very many locations to go to in order to find someone beyond myself with a keen eye for knowledge--basically, a good teacher.
I really needed somebody who was different until I found out one day who it was I was looking for: myself! I found in myself the needs and the wants, the desires to strive to achieve beyond myself and through myself, through life itself, and seeing the art of it all.
So in the end, what does education really want? I for one think that we should have less intervention, in whatever way possible. Because there is that part of us still believes we know more about the world than we ever will. But is this part of us wrong?
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback