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Technical Ecstasy


Price: CDN$ 9.47 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
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26 new from CDN$ 5.72 8 used from CDN$ 6.99

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Frequently Bought Together

Technical Ecstasy + Never Say Die + Sabotage
Price For All Three: CDN$ 26.45


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 2 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000002KGG
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,529 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Back Street Kids
2. You Won't Change Me
3. It's Allright
4. Gypsy
5. All Moving Parts (Stand Still)
6. Rock'n'Roll Doctor
7. She's Gone
8. Dirty Women

Product Description

Keyboards, strings and melodic vocals by drummer Billy Ward entered Sabbath's domain on this 1976 LP. But so did raging rockers like Back Street Kids and You Won't Change Me .

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Terrence J Reardon on June 20 2004
Format: Audio CD
Black Sabbath's seventh album Technical Ecstacy was released in October of 1976. The album was a departure for the band as it was their second album to be recorded in the US and the first to have artwork done by the legendary Hipgnosis(same company who did sleeves for Led Zeppelin, Genesis, Pink Floyd and many others). Also, Technical was the first album where problems between frontman Ozzy Osbourne and guitarist Tony Iommi came to the fore. Ozzy was battling drug addiction and Tony decided to take control of the band but it doesn't make it bad. I first bought this album on cassette in February of 1994 on a whim and loved it at first listen. I eventually bought the CD and found out that side one of the tape was actually side two and vice versa. The songs are great as well. The album kicks off with Backstreet Kids which was somewhat of an autobiographical song for the band and had a killer riff. Next is You Won't Change Me, which is perhaps the creepiest song off of this album and is a great song through and through. Drummer Bill Ward's vocal debut comes on the next track It's Alright. Many people putdown this song but I think it is beautiful. The underrated classic Gypsy is one of the band's best tracks and ends the first half with a bang. The second half kicks off with All Moving Parts (Stand Still) which strangely kicked off the cassette edition of the album but is a good track nonetheless. Next is Rock 'n' Roll Doctor which was the single and sounds somewhat like Rush's In the Mood from Rush's debut released in 1974. The ballad She's Gone follows and is somewhat seen as a mediocre followup to Changes on 1972's Black Sabbath Volume IV but I like it.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
Technical Ecstasy (1977.) Black Sabbath's seventh album.
Following Black Sabbath's tour to promote their 1975 release, Sabotage, the band encountered a rather difficult time. It is in this era that Ozzy really began the drug and alcohol binge that would drastically alter his life for many years to come. Despite these hardships, however, Black Sabbath managed to hold together. And in 1977, the band released its seventh album, Technical Ecstacy. This album tends to get a severe bashing from Sabbath fans. Is this one of the weakest Ozzy-era efforts, or is it actually a good album? Read on for my review.
About this album - BOTH viewpoints are correct for it. The album IS, indeed, one of the weakest releases of Black Sabbath's Ozzy Osbourne era. However, despite being such, it is STILL a good album! People seem to have a hard time with their favorite bands trying new things, but that's the only way a band can get any better! Obviously, it didn't work out all that well for Sabbath (in the "getting better" terms), but it did result in a solid album for them. The opener, Back Street Kids, is a solid rocker that sounds a bit like the material Ozzy would be recording in his eighties solo career. You Won't Change Me, the second song, is a little bit long, but still a solid hard rocker. It's Alright, the next song, is the most unusual one of all. First of all, it's a softer tune than what you're used to Sabbath delivering. And secondly, drummer Bill Ward sings! This song sounds NOTHING like Black Sabbath, but it's still a very good song. Another good rocker is Gypsy, but tracks like Rock 'N' Roll Doctor and All Moving Parts (Stand Still) come off seeming like fillers in comparison to some of the other tracks present.
Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
Technical Ecstasy (1977.) Black Sabbath's seventh album.
Following Black Sabbath's tour to promote their 1975 release, Sabotage, the band encountered a rather difficult time. It is in this era that Ozzy really began the drug and alcohol binge that would drastically alter his life for many years to come. Despite these hardships, however, Black Sabbath managed to hold together. And in 1977, the band released its seventh album, Technical Ecstacy. This album tends to get a severe bashing from Sabbath fans. Is this one of the weakest Ozzy-era efforts, or is it actually a good album? Read on for my review.
About this album - BOTH viewpoints are correct for it. The album IS, indeed, one of the weakest releases of Black Sabbath's Ozzy Osbourne era. However, despite being such, it is STILL a good album! People seem to have a hard time with their favorite bands trying new things, but that's the only way a band can get any better! Obviously, it didn't work out all that well for Sabbath (in the "getting better" terms), but it did result in a solid album for them. The opener, Back Street Kids, is a solid rocker that sounds a bit like the material Ozzy would be recording in his eighties solo career. You Won't Change Me, the second song, is a little bit long, but still a solid hard rocker. It's Alright, the next song, is the most unusual one of all. First of all, it's a softer tune than what you're used to Sabbath delivering. And secondly, drummer Bill Ward sings! This song sounds NOTHING like Black Sabbath, but it's still a very good song. Another good rocker is Gypsy, but tracks like Rock 'N' Roll Doctor and All Moving Parts (Stand Still) come off seeming like fillers in comparison to some of the other tracks present.
Read more ›
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