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Tempest: Remastered Edition [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Peter Bull, David Meyer, Neil Cunningham
  • Directors: Derek Jarman
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Kino Lorber films
  • Release Date: Aug. 7 2012
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0083Q4KCM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #83,738 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

The Tempest: Remastered Edition [Blu-ray]

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mathias on Oct. 15 2003
Format: DVD
Derek Jarman's vision of The Tempest is a strange but artistic one. Although at times it can be too weird to really take seriously, Jarman's film deserves to be seen by those who love Shakespeare and those who love movies. In The Tempest, Jarman combines elements of traditional Shakespeare, Stanley Kubrick, and the Rocky Horror Picture Show to create an extraordinary vision of the classic play. Baz Luhrmann owes a lot to this movie for his adaptation of Romeo and Juliet, as evidenced by the combination of genres, the bizarre imagery, and especially Elisabeth Welch's performance as a Josephine Baker-inspired chanteuse, which mirrors Desiree's incarnation as Billie Holiday in Luhrmann's film. It is worth noting that those who were not open-minded enough to appreciate Luhrmann's film should probably not see this one.
Despite all of these innovations, however, The Tempest moves too slowly to keep up with its own progressive style. The movie would have greatly benefited from being shortened by about half an hour. The one reason to sit through the tedious moments is to watch Karl Johnson, who, as a nervous Ariel, gives by far the most interesting performance.
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Format: DVD
Seeing Shakespeare adapted to film always thrills me, as long as the scriptwriter preserves Shakespeare's unmatchable linguistic phrasing. Jarman does preserve Shakespeare's words, though not always their order or their speaker. I have no problem granting liberal artistic license to most literary adaptations but, since Shakespeare leaves so few guidelines in the form of stage directions I have some trouble understanding why his adaptors wouldn't want to stick faithfully to Shakespeare's conception of his plays, which allows for so much individual interpretation as it stands. Jarman makes some cuts that I don't understand, such as that of the very funny scene in which Trinulco drunkenly mistakes Stephano and Caliban huddled together as a two-headed monster, and some cuts of which I approve, such as that of the nearly unintelligable "wedding" scene. He also elongates and adds emphasis to the scene in which Stephano, Caliban, and Trinulco steal from Prospero, which I think adds his signature to the film more than any other scene in its homoerotic interpretation of acting. The most enjoyable of Jarman's interpretations, I found to be his visual representation of Prospero's magic with a beautiful and captivating array of white candles, mystical crystals, and white chalk scribblings of strange symbols and geometric patterns. The acting is overall rather mediocre, as most of the actors speak every line with weighty ponderance, as if all of Shakespeare is meant to be taken in stiff seriousness. The only truly convincing performance is that of Alonso, King of Naples, who talks of the son he presumes dead with heavy sadness but of sleeping with a tone that conveys the mundanity of such lines. Ferdinand, however, seems equally distant and dejected when he speaks of Prospero's cruelty and of Miranda's beauty. Overall, this is well worth watching for fans of the Bard or of Jarman's cinematic style.
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Format: DVD
Seeing Shakespeare adapted to film always thrills me, as long as the scriptwriter preserves Shakespeare's unmatchable linguistic phrasing. Jarman does preserve Shakespeare's words, though not always their order or their speaker. I have no problem granting liberal artistic license to most literary adaptations but, since Shakespeare leaves so few guidelines in the form of stage directions I have some trouble understanding why his adaptors wouldn't want to stick faithfully to Shakespeare's conception of his plays, which allows for so much individual interpretation as it stands. Jarman makes some cuts that I don't understand, such as that of the very funny scene in which Trinulco drunkenly mistakes Stephano and Caliban huddled together as a two-headed monster, and some cuts of which I approve, such as that of the nearly unintelligable "wedding" scene. He also elongates and adds emphasis to the scene in which Stephano, Caliban, and Trinulco steal from Prospero, which I think adds his signature to the film more than any other scene in its homoerotic interpretation of acting. The most enjoyable of Jarman's interpretations, I found to be his visual representation of Prospero's magic with a beautiful and captivating array of white candles, mystical crystals, and white chalk scribblings of strange symbols and geometric patterns. The acting is overall rather mediocre, as most of the actors speak every line with weighty ponderance, as if all of Shakespeare is meant to be taken in stiff seriousness. The only truly convincing performance is that of Alonso, King of Naples, who talks of the son he presumes dead with heavy sadness but of sleeping with a tone that conveys the mundanity of such lines. Ferdinand, however, seems equally distant and dejected when he speaks of Prospero's cruelty and of Miranda's beauty. Overall, this is well worth watching for fans of the Bard or of Jarman's cinematic style.
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By colin godwin on March 28 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Watchable,but not as good quality as I expected for a Blu-Ray disc..The best version of the Tempest I have ever seen,though!
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