Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Tex Avery, King of Cartoons Paperback – Aug 1 1985


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 130.11 CDN$ 3.44

2014 Books Gift Guide for Children & Teens
Browse our featured books to find gift ideas for the boys or girls on your holiday shopping list this year!



Product Details

  • Paperback: 237 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / Da Capo (Aug. 1 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0306802481
  • ISBN-13: 978-0306802485
  • Product Dimensions: 27.6 x 20.7 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 680 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #523,763 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. Rui Batarda on June 6 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is worthless because :
- it offers little insight into Avery's genius
- it's short on the man's biography
- it focuses too much on the cartoons
- a large portion of it is made up of interviews with Avery and others; it's easy to write books that way, using text that's already written
- every picture is in black and white; not a single one in colour; would you like to watch Avery's cartoons in b & w ?
- it is printed on mediocre paper; when you're reading a page you are very much aware of the pictures printed on the other side of the page
- it's grossly overpriced
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
Written more than a decade before "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" made it okay for adults to enjoy animated cartoons, Joe Adamson's labor-of-love tribute to cartoon pioneer Tex Avery is a must-have for any scholar of animation. Containing perhaps the only extensive interview with Tex Avery before his death before 1980, the book looks back on the illustrious career of a shy, quiet man whose only ambition was to make people laugh. Walt Disney and Chuck Jones are the two most famous names of the Golden Age of cartoons, but they both owe a debt to Tex Avery. In addition to the personal look at Avery's life, the book contains a complete filmography of Avery's theatrical cartoons, plus interviews with the people Tex worked with over the years. While the 1996 book "Tex Avery" by John Canemaker provided a look at the more tragic side of Avery's career (as well as a wealth of background and behind-the-scenes material), Adamson's book is still the definitive look at the fun-loving, innocent personality of the creator of Droopy Dog, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the man who broke the shackles of "realism" in animation by declaring, "In a cartoon you can do anything!"
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
"Tex Avery: King Of Cartoons" is a unique look into the world of Tex Avery. Adamson opens the book with a fun to read analysis of Avery's cartoons and their background. Then comes the best part; interviews with Heck Allen, Mike Maltese, and Avery himself. They give an in-depth and very funny account of everyday activities at Termite Terrace. This book is essential for its vast amount of information. A good buy; highly recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
A grand, classic tribute to the great gagman of animation Oct. 4 1998
By Modemac - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Written more than a decade before "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" made it okay for adults to enjoy animated cartoons, Joe Adamson's labor-of-love tribute to cartoon pioneer Tex Avery is a must-have for any scholar of animation. Containing perhaps the only extensive interview with Tex Avery before his death before 1980, the book looks back on the illustrious career of a shy, quiet man whose only ambition was to make people laugh. Walt Disney and Chuck Jones are the two most famous names of the Golden Age of cartoons, but they both owe a debt to Tex Avery. In addition to the personal look at Avery's life, the book contains a complete filmography of Avery's theatrical cartoons, plus interviews with the people Tex worked with over the years. While the 1996 book "Tex Avery" by John Canemaker provided a look at the more tragic side of Avery's career (as well as a wealth of background and behind-the-scenes material), Adamson's book is still the definitive look at the fun-loving, innocent personality of the creator of Droopy Dog, Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the man who broke the shackles of "realism" in animation by declaring, "In a cartoon you can do anything!"
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Man of Unique Talent Feb. 25 2012
By Pugwash - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The word "genius" evokes images of Albert Einstein, or Jean-Paul Sartre. And yet, genius cuts accross many art forms and industries.

The cartoon was still in infant stage when Tex Avery entered it's realm. It was a convergence of fortuitous timing. He joined a team of almost limitless creativity, and a studio that gave him almost limitless leeway. The results were spectacular. His style, his passion, and his brilliant and bizarre sense of humor were allowed to move to the fore. Millions watched his cartoons, came to imitate and savor his characters, and love a set of possibilies that up to then, had seemed impossible.

The circumstances Avery created made people laugh in incredulity. The plotlines were frenetic, and the action and stories were mesmerizing. Today, with many of his cartoons more than 70 years old, they still have a fresh, timeless energy about them. They are classic, and can be enjoyed by adults and children too young to remember their inception.

This book captures Avery in the final years of his life. It shows a living legend, who is too modest to comprehend his greatness. It is a quick read, and both tells his story, and the story of the cartoon characters he created. Many are part of the fabric of our culture. Bugs Bunny, Chillie Willie, Woody Woodpecker and Droopy. There are many pictures, and some funny stories of the eccentric personalities that populated the movie studios during that prolific and seminal time of Hollywood.

By all means, read this book!
Very informative, with a couple of reservations Sept. 17 2011
By Matt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Adamson presents a wealth of information on Avery's work. The only two criticisms I kind find, would be the lack of color photos showing Avery's amazing animation and Adamson's feeble attempts at being critical of Avery's films. I like reading about Avery and the history of animation, I couldn't care less about his personal opinions of the shorts he examines.
8 of 17 people found the following review helpful
A poor buy June 6 2002
By E. Rui Batarda - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is worthless because :
- it offers little insight into Avery's genius
- it's short on the man's biography
- it focuses too much on the cartoons
- a large portion of it is made up of interviews with Avery and others; it's easy to write books that way, using text that's already written
- every picture is in black and white; not a single one in colour; would you like to watch Avery's cartoons in b & w ?
- it is printed on mediocre paper; when you're reading a page you are very much aware of the pictures printed on the other side of the page
- it's grossly overpriced


Feedback