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The Art Of Falling Apart [Original recording remastered]

Soft Cell Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 17.25 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details


1. Forever The Same
2. Where The Heart Is
3. Numbers
4. Heat
5. Kitchen Sink Drama
6. Baby Doll
7. Loving You Hating Me
8. The Art Of Falling Apart
9. Hendrix Medley
10. Martin
11. Barriers
12. It's A Mug's Game

Product Description

Product Description

Digitally Remastered With New Sleeve Notes & New Packaging.

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A Superb Re-release March 23 2000
Format:Audio CD
Beautifully remastered, this is arguably the best album they've made. Includes bonus tracks "Martin" "Hendrix Medley" "Barriers" and "It's a Mugs Game", the first two ONLY available on this cd! Totally indispensable.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good 3rd Time Effort as Soft Cell Grows Up! Sept. 14 2005
By Frederick Baptist - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Why 3rd time effort? Some people forget about "Non-Stop Esctatic Dancing" which was their 2nd effort and judging from the quality of said album compared to this and the first one, I'm not surprised. This remastered version, however, sounds a lot better than my lp version of this good grown up effort by the band except that some tracks still seem to be too bottom heavy and the highs not quite there.

About the tracks though what I mean about growing up is that the quality of the music and the lyrics is a far cry from what's on their freshman effort. That's not to say that "Non-Stop...Cabaret" isn't good; on the contrary it's one of my favourite albums of all time but the subject matter and the choice of lyrics for this album are much more complex and serious and show a band that's developing and growing.

Other than the not so great apparently "remastered" sound, the reason this only got 4 stars from me is the fact that the bonus tracks other than the brilliant "It's a Mug's Game" actually detract from and spoils the enjoyment of the cd. The Jimi Hendrix medley was really awful and did nothing to enhance the disc and really should never have been added. This was just pure filler material to make up the space.

Otherwise, there are many great tracks here like my favourite, "Numbers", "Kitchen Sink Drama" as well as "Where the Heart Is" and "Loving You, Hating Me."

This and their first album are by far the best work Soft Cell have ever done.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Superb Re-release March 23 2000
By yipyipcoyote - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Beautifully remastered, this is arguably the best album they've made. Includes bonus tracks "Martin" "Hendrix Medley" "Barriers" and "It's a Mugs Game", the first two ONLY available on this cd! Totally indispensable.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Whole album plus bonus tracks. May 16 2009
By R. Vayda - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I must admit I have been a die hard Soft Cell fan since 1982. The is one of those albums that needs to grow on you. I have had the vinyl release with the bonus 12" of extra track for almost 2 decades now. It is nice to have them all on one disc for your listening pleasure.
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Follow Up Oct. 23 2002
By William D. Ackerman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Being a huge fan of Soft Cell, I loved this album when it first came out. It is the follow up to "Non Stop Erotic Cabaret" the duo's debut.
Listening to it today, It still sounds good but at the same time, a little dated here and there. Some of the songs also run a little long and some sound completely 80ish.
The CD as a whole has a more sinister tone then their debut. While "Non Stop Erotic Caberet" sounds as though they had a blast making it, Art of Falling Apart" sounds a bit more like it was a chore. This is not to say it isn't a good Soft Cell offering. Songs such as "Forever the same", "Martin", "Heat", "loving You, Hating Me" are highlights. Then there is the demented "Baby Doll" which demonstrates just how twisted these guys really are. {in a good way}
5.0 out of 5 stars Bubbly Synthpop Vs Deliciously Dark Drama March 12 2013
By Pet Nemo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
To me, that's how Soft Cell have "fallen apart" in this album. Very simply the tracks fall into two major categories.

Bubbly Synthpop:

Most of them were hits or radio staples back in 1982 and are instantly recognizable as Soft Cell's signature sound. From the opener Forever The Same, Where The Heart Is, Numbers, Loving You Hating Me to the b side It's A Mug's Game - these represent the happy side of Soft Cell. The versions here are a lot longer and more interesting than those on The Very Best Of Soft Cell.

The sinister macabre stuff:

Baby Doll - mildly disturbing. Marc's facial expression in Live In Milan is even more disturbing.

Martin - about a boy who hears voices in his head and wants to kill. An audio equivalent of the horror movie of the same name. It was an extra 12" given with the vinyl album as it did not fit with the parent counterpart.

Hendrix Medley - lyrically and musically sinister in feel. There are three parts a) Hey Joe b) Purple Haze and c) Voodoo Chile. Came as a bonus 12" vinyl back in the day.

These do not fall into the above two categories:

Kitchen Sink Drama - my favorite here as it is like a sparkling piece of musical theater.

The Art Of Falling Apart - merges synth with that creepy quality. Very masterful.

Barriers - b side to Numbers. A great experimental piece that's like something out of David Sylvian's Brilliant Trees.

I did not dare to buy this in 1982 because of the creepy album artwork - you see the duo wearing masks against a backdrop of skulls, human bones and pearls. If you leaf through the pages, there's another one of them dressed as voodoo practitioners. There's also a shot of Almond pointing towards the masks in the background. Are these symbolic of who is behind the music?

The remastered and expanded Art Of Falling Apart should satisfy most synthpop lovers and for those who enjoy horror in audio doses, you'll love this.
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