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The Art Of Falling Apart Original recording remastered, Import


Price: CDN$ 17.69 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 1 1983)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Mercury - Universal Special Imports
  • ASIN: B00000B94X
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

1. Forever The Same
2. Where The Heart Is
3. Numbers
4. Heat
5. Kitchen Sink Drama
6. Baby Doll
7. Loving You Hating Me
8. The Art Of Falling Apart
9. Hendrix Medley
10. Martin
11. Barriers
12. It's A Mug's Game

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By yipyipcoyote on March 24 2000
Format: Audio CD
Beautifully remastered, this is arguably the best album they've made. Includes bonus tracks "Martin" "Hendrix Medley" "Barriers" and "It's a Mugs Game", the first two ONLY available on this cd! Totally indispensable.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Good 3rd Time Effort as Soft Cell Grows Up! Sept. 14 2005
By Frederick Baptist - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Why 3rd time effort? Some people forget about "Non-Stop Esctatic Dancing" which was their 2nd effort and judging from the quality of said album compared to this and the first one, I'm not surprised. This remastered version, however, sounds a lot better than my lp version of this good grown up effort by the band except that some tracks still seem to be too bottom heavy and the highs not quite there.

About the tracks though what I mean about growing up is that the quality of the music and the lyrics is a far cry from what's on their freshman effort. That's not to say that "Non-Stop...Cabaret" isn't good; on the contrary it's one of my favourite albums of all time but the subject matter and the choice of lyrics for this album are much more complex and serious and show a band that's developing and growing.

Other than the not so great apparently "remastered" sound, the reason this only got 4 stars from me is the fact that the bonus tracks other than the brilliant "It's a Mug's Game" actually detract from and spoils the enjoyment of the cd. The Jimi Hendrix medley was really awful and did nothing to enhance the disc and really should never have been added. This was just pure filler material to make up the space.

Otherwise, there are many great tracks here like my favourite, "Numbers", "Kitchen Sink Drama" as well as "Where the Heart Is" and "Loving You, Hating Me."

This and their first album are by far the best work Soft Cell have ever done.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A Superb Re-release March 23 2000
By yipyipcoyote - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Beautifully remastered, this is arguably the best album they've made. Includes bonus tracks "Martin" "Hendrix Medley" "Barriers" and "It's a Mugs Game", the first two ONLY available on this cd! Totally indispensable.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Whole album plus bonus tracks. May 16 2009
By R. Vayda - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I must admit I have been a die hard Soft Cell fan since 1982. The is one of those albums that needs to grow on you. I have had the vinyl release with the bonus 12" of extra track for almost 2 decades now. It is nice to have them all on one disc for your listening pleasure.
Bubbly Synthpop Vs Deliciously Dark Drama March 12 2013
By Pet Nemo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
To me, that's how Soft Cell have "fallen apart" in this album. Very simply the tracks fall into two major categories.

Bubbly Synthpop:

Most of them were hits or radio staples back in 1982 and are instantly recognizable as Soft Cell's signature sound. From the opener Forever The Same, Where The Heart Is, Numbers, Loving You Hating Me to the b side It's A Mug's Game - these represent the happy side of Soft Cell. The versions here are a lot longer and more interesting than those on The Very Best Of Soft Cell.

The sinister macabre stuff:

Baby Doll - mildly disturbing. Marc's facial expression in Live In Milan is even more disturbing.

Martin - about a boy who hears voices in his head and wants to kill. An audio equivalent of the horror movie of the same name. It was an extra 12" given with the vinyl album as it did not fit with the parent counterpart.

Hendrix Medley - lyrically and musically sinister in feel. There are three parts a) Hey Joe b) Purple Haze and c) Voodoo Chile. Came as a bonus 12" vinyl back in the day.

These do not fall into the above two categories:

Kitchen Sink Drama - my favorite here as it is like a sparkling piece of musical theater.

The Art Of Falling Apart - merges synth with that creepy quality. Very masterful.

Barriers - b side to Numbers. A great experimental piece that's like something out of David Sylvian's Brilliant Trees.

I did not dare to buy this in 1982 because of the creepy album artwork - you see the duo wearing masks against a backdrop of skulls, human bones and pearls. If you leaf through the pages, there's another one of them dressed as voodoo practitioners. There's also a shot of Almond pointing towards the masks in the background. Are these symbolic of who is behind the music?

The remastered and expanded Art Of Falling Apart should satisfy most synthpop lovers and for those who enjoy horror in audio doses, you'll love this.
Listen to it more than once... Nov. 21 2011
By Lackadaisical - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you like Non-Stop Erotic Cabaret and Non-Stop Ecstatic Dancing, then there's a really good chance that you will enjoy this album, as well. I say "really good" because this album is not exactly the same style as its predecessors...

Songs like Where The Heart Is, Kitchen Sink Drama, Loving You Hating Me, Barriers, and It's a Mug's Game are the ones on this album that evoke the same carefree, upbeat feeling of the two Non-Stop albums.

And then, there are the songs Heat, Baby Doll, The Art of Falling Apart, and Martin. I'd consider these songs to be a bit darker in tone than the rest of the album and the two previous albums. They sound like they would've fit in well on Soft Cell's next album, This Last Night in Sodom.

So, because The Art of Falling Apart is almost like a mix of the Non-Stops and This Last Night, I'd say it's a very balanced album. And although it isn't my overall favorite of Soft Cell's, it still has really great songs! Some of the songs may take a few listens before you can really get into them. The song that I love the most is The Art of Falling Apart. It's such an incredible song! Definitely one of my all time favorites by Soft Cell!

A lot of people seem to be criticizing the songs "Martin" and "Hendrix Medley," but these are great songs! Yes, they are both 10 minutes in length, but good none the less. Hendrix Medley contains 3 songs (Hey Joe, Purple Haze, Voodoo Chile), so it really doesn't feel like a 10 minute song when you listen to it. Martin does drag slightly, but it's still an interesting song. It's actually based on the film "Martin" from 1977, and if you watch this movie, then the song becomes even more intriguing.

So, I'm not gonna lie, you might have to listen to it a couple times before considering it to be a GREAT album. But, upon one listen, it should at least be considered a GOOD album. You'll probably find some songs that you love, and others not so much.

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