CDN$ 47.97
  • List Price: CDN$ 48.24
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.27 (1%)
Usually ships within 2 to 5 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Basics of Adoption: A Guide for Building Families in the U.S. and Canada Hardcover – Sep 30 2006


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 47.97
CDN$ 27.82 CDN$ 2.80

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Praeger (Sept. 30 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 027598799X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0275987992
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 16 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 612 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,362,744 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Save your money Oct. 25 2006
By Leah Binder - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a very disappointing, innaccurate, and poorly edited book. I found many inaccuracies and outmoded information. To name just two: the statement that adoption from China is open to single men (not the case), or the statement that international adoptions are much more complex than domestic--definitely not always true. The section on homestudies will unnecessarily scare anyone new to adoption. The book describes homestudies where social workers ask about your sex life and never give you a copy of the home study report, which is absolutely ridiculous in the experience of anyone I know who has adopted. Perhaps certain kinds of adoptions require this kind of home study, but it is rare and the book makes it sound like the norm. Since the book's promotion touts the value of its authors' backgrounds in social work and psychology, it's surprising how careless these authors are with the language of adoption, something that is generally treated with precision and sensitivity among the adoption professionals I've encountered. For instance, the chapter on international adoption begins: "...It is clear that international adoptions have become a major alternative for Americans unable to have children of their own..." As any adoptive parent will quickly caution, adopted children are indeed "our own" children. Similarly, the book characterizes different countries according to how large a "supplier" they are of children for adoption, as if these children are commodities for consumption, an offensive way to describe parents building families. The list of adoption agencies in the back is incomplete and does not list websites, though the web is now a critical tool for adoptive parents. I'm sorry to have wasted the money on this book and encourage libraries to select other titles with more accurate and complete information for adoptive parents.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Only Book You'll Need Dec 19 2006
By BlueSpeak.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is the most comprehensive adoption book I've ever read. Most of

the adoption books I've come across are written by adoptive parents,

journalists, and social activists, well meaning people who have never

placed a child for adoption and have little to offer other than their

own biased opinions.

What I like about this book is the fact that it was written by people

who have professional experience with adoption. There is no substitute

for experience when it comes to adoption, and that is this book's

strength. Allen is a nationally known psychologist, and, according to

the book's introduction, Dickerson placed hundreds of children on

adoption while working for a public adoption agency.

In one volume, this book explains what the home study process is all

about; it gives insider information about the best way to seek approval

from public and private agencies; it offers practical advice for single

adoptive parents; and it lists more than 1,400 adoption agencies in the

U.S. and Canada. I found the section on international adoption

especially helpful.
value? April 21 2012
By artistajo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was very disappointed in this book, supposedly written by a professional, because most of the references to studies do not even mention the study or cite the studies he references. Without citation, the mention of studies is meaningless. One such comment that was repeatedly mentioned, without evidence, was that only fathers could teach their children math.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Basics of Adoption: A Guide for Building Families... Dec 31 2006
By Sadie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
"My Favorite Adoption Book!"

My primary interest in this book was because I'm considering adopting from abroad. I've read a number of books on the subject, but they all left me wanting to know more.

I almost didn't buy this book because of a previous review on this site, but I took a chance and I'm glad I did. The reviewer must have had a personal grudge against the authors because she said they were wrong when they wrote that China accepted applications from single men. I went to the state department website on China adoptions to get the truth and, guess what, it's the reviewer who is wrong. According to the US government, China accepts "married couples (one man, one woman) and single heterosexual persons." China doesn't accept gay singles, something the book makes very clear.

This is a terrific book. It has all you'd need to know about international adoptions, with descriptions of the procedures required for each country.

Another thing I like about it is the chapter written especially for Canadians who want to adopt abroad, even in the US. I was totally shocked to learn that the US sends American children to other countries for adoption.


Feedback