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The Battle of Algiers: The Criterion Collection [Blu-ray] (Version française)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Brahim Haggiag, Jean Martin, Saadi Yacef, Samia Kerbash, Fusia El Kader
  • Directors: Gillo Potecorvo
  • Format: Black & White, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Arabic, French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Criterion
  • Release Date: Aug. 9 2011
  • Run Time: 121 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005152CB4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,234 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Silver on Nov. 9 2012
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
The Battle of Algiers is a classic film about urban guerilla warfare / terrorism and counter terrorism in the context of the Algerian revolution. Much has already been written about the film and it's qualities: the director's use of regular local people as well as actors (one of the FLN leaders / bomb makers is played by Yacef Saadi, who actually was the one responsible for the bombing campaign in Algiers); the on location filming only three years after the end of the war; the documentary feel of the footage. It should be said as well - and this was crucial for me to be able to stomach the film - that director Gillo Pontecorvo along with screen writer Franco Solinas - manage by and large, despite their communist, pro revolutionary feelings, to resist any temptation to wallow in overt propoganda and the taking of sides. This film is used to this day in history courses on France & Algeria; as well as by the military in counter-insurgency warfare training.

Criterion as usual has put out a great product. The film image and sound quality has been cleaned & restored to their usual high standards. The DVD comes with a booklet containing information about the film, it's subject matter and the director; and second to the actual film is a second DVD containing some very interesting interviews with some of the historical figures referenced in the film. There's also an interesting Italian t.v. documentary about Pontecorvo's return to Algiers in the early 90's - when the islamist F.I.S. crisis was exploding.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Adam Scheuer on May 11 2004
Format: VHS Tape
by Adam Scheuer
Great works of literature speak to all ages. Does the same apply to masterpieces of cinema? The Battle Of Algiers originally came to the United States in 1967. It spoke to that era's inner-city strife and racial tensions, and the escalating campaign in Vietnam. Re-released across America in January 2004, The Battle of Algiers seems even more relevant now. Set in Algeria from 1954-1957, the film portrays the Islamic Algerian nationalist terrorist campaign, organized by the National Liberation Front (NLF), to drive out the French, who had colonized the city Algiers in 1830.
Contemporary journalists and movie reviewers are not the only commentators to have likened the guerilla uprising in Algeria to the current situation in Iraq. On October 28, 2003, former United States National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski said, "If you want to understand what's going on in Iraq right now, I recommend The Battle of Algiers." Even the Pentagon screened the film in August of 2003, advertising it with a flyer that stated forebodingly: "How to win a battle against terrorism and lose the war of ideas. Children shoot soldiers at point-blank range. Women plant bombs in cafes. Soon the entire Arab population builds to a mad fervor. Sound familiar? The French have a plan. It succeeds tactically, but fails strategically. To understand why, come to a rare showing of this film."
Irrespective of The Battle of Algiers's newfound political salience and contemporary relevance, it is simply a superb work of visual art. Filmed in 1965, the cinematography, which employs hand-held cameras, natural light, and grainy film, is so visually arresting and looks so authentic that the film seems more like a documentary than a dramatization.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Franz L Kessler on March 25 2004
Format: VHS Tape
I recommend this movie, given its outstanding quality, but also because of its actual message: a war is won militarily in an Arab country, but with no law in place and broken dignity peace is lost on the political front. This movie is important for America! It stresses the need for integrity, and lawfulness whilst occupaying foreign lands.
The movie contains several good perspectives on how to act and not to act in/with 'Arabic' countries. The Algeria war developped from general unease in the early 50ties. Algeria was part of France, yet local Algerians were not recognized as French citizens. On top of this came the question of landownership, as the arable land was controlled by European immigrants. Originally, the liberation movement started as a civil rights movement, not really different from the struggle of American Blacks during the sixties. Continued suppression of these, in my eyes, legitimate demands led to exacerbation and a deep division in the country, and incompatible futures arose in the minds of the people.
The movie is Italian-made, and started as a documentary during the Algeria war. However, the project couldn't be completed at that time. Two, three years after the war the film was completed in Algiers - as a re-enacted documentory, if you want. It comes very close to a true documentary film, and many critics in Europe rank Pontecorvo's as the best movie of its kind.
The main flow of the story reflects history correctly happened. Names are either real or slightly changed. (Commander "O" stands for colonel Ausseresse - I recommend to read his perspective on the war, too). The film, however, also tries to elaborate on the underlying psyche of the parties involved, which leads to a range of imaginative elements woven into the story.
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