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The Bette Davis Collection: Volume 3

Bette Davis , Miriam Hopkins , Anatole Litvak , Arthur Davis    NR (Not Rated)   DVD
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 72.29 & FREE Shipping. Details
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In This Our Life Homewrecker Davis Runs Off With Sister Olivia De Havilland'S Hubby And That'S Just For Starters! The Old Maid Let The Fireworks Begin. Miriam Hopkins Poses As The Mother Of The Child Davis Bore Out Of Wedlock...The Arrangement Is Beginning To Fray. All This, And Heaven Too Enchanted By Governess Davis, Nobleman Charles Boyer Murders His Wife. But Is La Bette As Innocent As She Appears? The Great Lie Friends Make The Best Enemies. Scheming Concert Pianist Mary Astor And Selfless Davis Are Entangled In Secrets And Lies. Deception Now, Voyagers' Davis, Claude Rains And Paul Henried Reunite In A Gloriously Flamboyant Tale Of Musicians, Indiscretion And Murder. Watch On The Rhine A Leader Of Germany'S Anti-Hitler Underground Is Hunted By Nazi Agents In Washington Dc. Dashiell Hammett Adapts Lillian Hellman'S Play.


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars beware Jan. 1 2013
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
great films of course but two of the dvd didn't work. recyled them rather than go through the hassle and expense of returning to Amazon. Very disappointing - makes me hesitate to purchase dvd's online with A again.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Acceptional Viewing From The Masters Jan. 20 2010
Format:DVD
5 Acceptional movies all in one package, I have owned these movies in VHS format and just love the acting and actors in their roles. Bette Davis makes each of these 5 stories so interesting, you more or less get pulled into the plot and you can hardly wait to see how it will all pan out. My favorite was Of This Our Life her character was so believeable . . . you just wanted to choke the snot out of her. My next favorite was The Great Lie with fine acting by all including George Brent and Mary Astor. I am looking forward to my next Bette Davis Collection and fine acting. I highly recommend to the public for their viewing enjoyment.
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Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  97 reviews
97 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A boxed set in celebration of Bette Davis' 100th birthday Jan. 19 2008
By calvinnme - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
This set contains six films, all new to DVD in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Bette Davis' birth. Here we are on the third DVD boxed set of Bette Davis films by Warner Home Video, and we are still getting A List properties. The details are as follows:

In This Our Life (1942) - In my opinion this is one of Davis' best films, yet TCM will show "Jezebel" ten times a year and never show this one. Davis and Olivia De Haviland play sisters. Davis runs off with her sister's husband right before she herself is to be married. As time passes, her ex-fiance falls for De Haviland's character, and they decide to be married. When the husband Davis absconded with kills himself, Davis returns home and decides she wants her ex-fiance back. This film spotlights the kind of scenery-chewing role that Davis excelled at. Extra features include:
Commentary by film historian Jeannine Basinger
Vintage newsreel
Technicolor patriotic short: March On, America!
Technicolor musical short: Spanish Fiesta
Classic cartoon: Who's Who in the Zoo
Trailers of In This Our Life and 1942's Desperate Journey
Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

The Old Maid (1939) - Davis and Miriam Hopkin play cousins. Hopkins is the belle-of-the-ball type who is marrying a well-off man to spite her colorful yet poor suitor that she in fact still harbors deep feelings for. Davis plays Charlotte, the pretty but quiet type who comforts the ex-suitor after Hopkins rejects him. The rejected suitor then goes off to fight in the Civil War and is killed. Years later, as Charlotte is planning her own wedding, her cousin finds out that Charlotte had an illegitimate child by her ex-beau. Her retribution ruins Charlotte's life and yet binds her to Charlotte forever. Extra features include:
Vintage newsreel
Technicolor historical short: Lincoln in the White House
Howard Hill sports short: Sword Fishing
Classic cartoons: The Film Fan and Kristopher Kolumbus
Trailers of The Old Maid and 1939's Confessions of a Spy
Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

All This and Heaven Too (1940)
Davis plays Henriette, a governess to children whose wealthy parents are unhappily married. When the Duke (Charles Boyer) falls in love with Henriette, the angry wife dies a death that appears to be murder. The Duke and Henriette are instantly under suspicion, which is made no better when the Duke dies by his own hand. This leaves Henriette to face the questioning authorities alone. This film features a kinder, gentler, softer Bette Davis than roles she often played. Extra features include:
Commentary by The Women of Warner Bros. author Daniel Bubbeo.
Vintage newsreel
Technicolor patriotic short: Meet the Fleet
Classic cartoons: Hollywood Daffy and Porky's Last Stand
Trailers of All This, and Heaven Too and 1940's Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet
Audio-only bonus: Radio show adaptation with the film's stars
Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

The Great Lie (1941)
Another pairing of Davis with George Brent, a leading man with whom she had such great chemistry. George Brent plays Peter, a man who marries concert pianist Sandra (Mary Astor) on an alcohol-induced lark. He really loves Maggie (Bette Davis), and repents at leisure. The marriage turns out not to be legal, Peter goes back to Maggie and marries her, and then disappears in the South American jungle while on an aviation expedition for the government. After Peter's disappearance Sandra discovers she is pregnant with Peter's child - something she doesn't want at all but Maggie desperately does. Extra features include:
Vintage newsreel
Broadway Brevities short: At the Stroke of Twelve
Oscar-nominated Technicolor Sports Parade short: Kings of the Turf
Hollywood Novelty short: Polo with the Stars
Classic cartoon: Porky's Pooch
Trailers of The Great Lie and 1941's The Strawberry Blonde
Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

Deception (1946)
A rather odd but good film. Davis plays pianist Christine Radcliffe who is separated from her great love, cellist Karel Novak (Paul Henreid), by World War II. She presumes he is dead and has had an affair with wealthy and unstable composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains). Karel reappears after the war and he and Christine marry, but she can't shake the spectre of Hollenius who continues to torment her. Hollenius' character could have resulted in over-the-top camp in the hands of a lesser actor, but Rains makes the role work. Extra features include:
Commentary by film historian Foster Hirsch
Vintage newsreel
Oscar-winning Technicolor Sports Parade Short: Facing Your Danger
Technicolor Specials Short: Movieland Magic
Classic cartoon: Mouse Menace
Trailers of Deception and 1946's A Stolen Life
Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

Watch on the Rhine (1943)
Sara (Bette Davis) and Kurt Muller (Paul Lukas) and their three children are returning to her mother's home in Washington DC after 18 years in Europe where Kurt was working for the underground resistance. However, even in his mother-in-law's American home, Kurt can't escape those who would like to do him harm for the work he did in Europe. Extra features include:
Career profile - Bette Davis: A Basically Benevolent Volcano
Commentary by film historian
Technicolor patriotic short: March On, America
Musical short: Ozzie Nelson and His Orchestra
Classic cartoon: The Wise Quacking Duck
Trailers of Watch on the Rhine and 1943's Mission to Moscow
Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)
35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LOVE THE LOFT MISS DAVIS! May 8 2009
By Michael C. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
It would be a unforgiveable deception to tell you that this Bette Davis, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains vehicle is anything but top rate glossy soap bubble popping high drama. A rainy day is the perfect time to watch this film, late afternoon when the light seems like it will last forever giving you that trapped in time feeling. This film evokes that effect through out. Wonderful light, and so much of it takes place in twilight, or in rain, and in the deepest inky night.

It may not be considered a film noir in the classic sense but it certainly, as shot by the incredible Ernest Haller; it looks like one and one of the most gorgeous of the style. It is more like a Woman's Noir with its story of a basically good woman driven by her deceptions to do bad things, very bad things.

Without a shadow of a doubt this is one of Claude Rains most entertaining, sharp, insightfully and wicked performances. He is pure joy to watch as he manipulates each person he comes in contact with in the story. He is the rotten, jealous petrified hard center of this poison soufflé. Bette Davis is wonderful of course and is dressed to the nines but what is remarkable to see is the fun she is having as she hands the film over to Mr.. Rains. They made so many wonderful films together and he is obviously someone she admired and loved to work with. She is strong and exciting in the role but she gets out of the way and lets him have his day.

And yet beyond all of this there are two reasons I love this film. It has a remarkable classic Hollywood score by Erich Wolfgang Korngold and features his now famous "Hollenius' Cello Concerto" as well as music by Beethoven, Wagner and Schubert. The music is as much a star of the film as anyone else. And in the commentary you will learn how the magic of Hollywood was employed to make the non-musical Henreid play that violin and not look like he is trying to saw it in half, and that Bette Davis could indeed play the piano just as she does in the film.

Then there is the incredible and even inspiring set design. The loft that Davis lives in is forty years ahead of it time. It is an incredible set and must have inspired interior designers in some subliminal way over the years, for now in cities across America that look is so in vogue. The industrial concrete walls and the slanted floor to ceiling glass wall overlooking the city juxtaposed with a mix of modern furniture and antiques. It is timeless decorating, visually magnificent, barren, cold and full of dark corners where secrets can be hidden. In short a perfect design for this film.

If you are a Steve Martin fan see if you can spot the scene he borrowed from "Deception" so that he could act with Bette Davis in his very wonderful "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid." Whether working with Claude Rains or Steve Martin, Bette Davis lets both men shine as she casts her mega-watt star power over them.
44 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Special Features Jan. 19 2008
By Severin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Here is a list of the films on this set and the special features, as listed at Turner Classic Movies:

The Old Maid (1939)
Special Features:
· Warner Night at the Movies 1939 short subjects gallery:
- Vintage newsreel
- Technicolor historical short Lincoln in the White House
- Howard Hill sports short Sword Fishing
- Classic cartoons The Film Fan and Kristopher Kolumbus
- Trailers of The Old Maid and 1939's Confessions of a Nazi Spy
· Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

All This, and Heaven Too (1940)
Special Features:
· Commentary by The Women of Warner Bros. author Daniel Bubbeo.
· Warner Night at the Movies 1940 short subjects gallery:
- Vintage newsreel
- Technicolor patriotic short Meet the Fleet
- Classic cartoons Hollywood Daffy and Porky's Last Stand
- Trailers of All This, and Heaven To and 1940's Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet
· Audio-only bonus: Radioshow adaptation with the film's stars
· Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

The Great Lie (1941)
Special Features:
· Warner Night at the Movies 1941 Short Subjects Gallery:
- Vintage newsreel
- Broadway Brevities short At the Stroke of Twelve
- Oscar®-nominated Technicolor Sports Parade short Kings of the Turf
- Hollywood Novelty short Polo with the Stars
- Classic cartoon Porky's Pooch
- Trailers of The Great Lie and 1941's The Strawberry Blonde
· Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

Deception (1946)
Special Features:
· Commentary by film historian Foster Hirsch
· Warner Night at the Movies 1946 short subjects gallery:
- Vintage newsreel
- Oscar®-winning Technicolor Sports Parade Short Facing Your Danger
- Technicolor Specials Short Movieland Magic
- Classic cartoon Mouse Menace
- Trailers of Deception and 1946's A Stolen Life
· Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)

Watch on the Rhine (1943)
Special Features:
· Career profile Bette Davis: A Basically Benevolent Volcano
· Commentary by film historian Bernard F. Dick
· Warner Night at the Movies 1943 short subjects gallery:
- Technicolor patriotic short March On, America!
- Musical short Ozzie Nelson and His Orchestra
- Classic cartoon The Wise Quacking Duck
- Trailers of Watch on the Rhine and 1943's Mission to Moscow
· Subtitles: English & Français (main feature only)
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Second rate Davis but good package May 11 2008
By Douglas M - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
"Deception" was the last half decent Bette Davis vehicle from her glorious Warner Brother's years. Released in 1946, the film was based on a 2 character play called "Jealousy". Unfortunately, censorship robbed the film of credibility and the phoney ending just doesn't work as Davis herself recognised. Until then though, the film has some great features:

- an outstanding over the top performance by the great Claude Rains playing a composer/conductor named Hollenius. Rains, as Davis always acknowledged, steals the film.
- great sets, costumes and lighting creating a plush world among the operatic arty set in New York.

The DVD print is excellent and there are some good extras. The commentary is intriguing, carefully noting how the problems behind the scenes, including Davis's troubled private life (she was pregnant at the time) and insecurity about her looks contributed to the tension visible on the celluloid. There is a coloured short film about adventurers riding the Colorado river rapids and one set in Hollywood which puts together technicolour numbers from previous shorts dating back almost 10 years. Jane Wyman sings one of the songs and shows she was a competent singer. The cartoon is an hilarious gem as a mouse outwits Porky Pig. Don't miss when the mouse takes on a mechanical cat. This is animated perfection. Lastly, there is the original trailer of the film plus another Davis opus, "A Stolen Life".

The DVD is excellent value and even better if purchased as part of the Davis Set Volume 3.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Overdone Melodramatics Falter on a Weak Premise and Unsympathetic Characters Sept. 19 2009
By Ed Uyeshima - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
At the start of her career downturn at Warner Bros. until she was saved by Joseph Mankiewicz casting her at the last minute for her definitive role of Margo Channing in All About Eve, Bette Davis played one of her most morally puerile characters as Christine Radcliffe, a classical pianist who is unexpectedly reunited with the love of her life, cellist Karel Novak, whom she took for dead, while carrying on as the "protégé" of renowned composer Alexander Hollenius. Note the fancy, spacious apartment she can supposedly afford on a piano teacher's paltry wages. Had Christine shown any common sense, she would have told Karel within the first five minutes of their passionate embrace, gotten slapped for her supposed infidelity and then she would have been forgiven with violins swooning in the background. However, that would have made this 1946 Baroque-level soaper about seven minutes long. Instead, as directed by Irving Rapper in overly emphatic style, we get to watch Davis wrench her hands and get all tight-lipped as she tries to convince the tirelessly jealous Karel that she and Alex are merely good friends. Ha!

When Alex is not spending his time seething in a jealous rage, he is busy manipulating the nerves of poor Karel, whom Alex has suspiciously chosen to play the spotlight cello solo in his new concerto. The movie's most amusing scene is when the three go out for a pre-performance dinner as Alex plays the world's most pretentious diner in front of the increasingly exasperated lovers. The tension of Charlotte's deception leads to a melodramatic finish that recalls earlier Davis' vehicles, but this time for the weakest of reasons. Reunited with a mostly subdued Davis and Rapper from their classic tearjerker, 1942's Now, Voyager, Paul Henreid and Claude Rains play Karel and Alex, respectively. While Henried grapples with Karel's anger management issues, Rains easily steals the picture as the erudite composer. Some of the dialogue courtesy of John Collier and Joseph Than actually has some snap and wit but not nearly enough to make this the wallow it should be. Film historian Foster Hirsch provides a thoughtful commentary track on the 2008 DVD.
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