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The Bias of Communication Paperback – Sep 1 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 2 edition (Sept. 1 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802096069
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802096067
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 16 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #74,569 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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"MINERVA'S OWL begins its flight only in the gathering dusk . . ." Hegel wrote in reference to the crystallization of culture achieved in major classical writings in the period that saw the decline and fall of Grecian civilization. Read the first page
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By luccomeau@videotron.ca on Jan. 4 2000
Format: Paperback
This book and its ideas have stayed with me over 15 years since university : Innis (who influenced Mcluhan) discusses the effect of changes in media on the history of civilization : ex. the invention of papyrus. sometimes obscure, but always a paradigm-shifter
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By nohmn on July 1 2004
Format: Paperback
I find everything I read by Harold Innis deeply thought provoking. Even when he quotes what I feel are wrong headed observations by Marcel Granet or Winston Churchill on character based languages where I feel his conjectures reflect the fact he had never experienced learning such a language or thinking in one [instead of encouraging mental inflexibility, I would say, the contrary is true - 'lateral thinking' represented a concept I would never have had to introduce for any of my Chinese students], he feels so honest and so undogmatic, he is stimulating rather than irritating. [The passage occurs in 'A Plea For Time', one of the interesting essays in this book.]

He does not dogmatise but stimulates. He does not seek to preach but to help us participate in an ongoing process. In a way, he makes me feel, reading him, as I think a young Athenian might have felt who had had the chance to listen to and interact with Socrates.

I am very enthusiastic about this book and treasure my copy. I have become deeply interested in everything by Innis I can find.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Innis is a powerful experience July 1 2004
By nohmn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I find everything I read by Harold Innis deeply thought provoking. Even when he quotes what I feel are wrong headed observations by Marcel Granet or Winston Churchill on character based langauges where I feel his conjectures reflect the fact he had never experienced learning such a language or thinking in one [instead of encouraging mental inflexibility, I would say, the contrary is true - 'lateral thinking' represented a concept I would never had had to introduce for any of my Chinese students], he feels so honest and so undogmatic, he is stimulating rather than irritating. [The passage occurs in 'A Plea For Time', one of the interesting essays in this book.]
He does not dogmatise but stimulates. He does not seek to preach but to help us participate in an ongoing process. In a way, he makes me feel, reading him, as I think a young Greek might have felt who had had the chance to spend time listening to Socrates.
I am very enthusiastic about this book and treasure my copy. I have become deeply interested in everything by Innis I can find.
15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
keys to understanding the phases of human/media development Jan. 4 2000
By luccomeau@videotron.ca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book and its ideas have stayed with me over 15 years since university : Innis (who influenced Mcluhan) discusses the effect of changes in media on the history of civilization : ex. the invention of papyrus. sometimes obscure, but always a paradigm-shifter

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