The Bishop's Man and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 15.88
  • List Price: CDN$ 22.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.12 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Bishop's Man Paperback – Deckle Edge, Aug 3 2010


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Deckle Edge
"Please retry"
CDN$ 15.88
CDN$ 14.29 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

The Bishop's Man + Long Stretch + Why Men Lie
Price For All Three: CDN$ 46.16

Show availability and shipping details

  • In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Long Stretch CDN$ 14.40

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Why Men Lie CDN$ 15.88

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Canada (Aug. 3 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307357074
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307357076
  • Product Dimensions: 20.2 x 13 x 3.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #76,728 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

73 of 73 people found the following review helpful By M. Kavanagh on Nov. 10 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Bishop's Man is a wonderful book. It explores the many facets which contributed to and resulted from the sexual abuse scandal in the Catholic Church, through the story of a priest in Cape Breton.
The book follows Father Duncan McAskill on his journey from a difficult childhood through a career as a priest. He has been used by his bishop to help in supppressing scandals by being the messenger who has notified priests that they are to be moved. As he struggles with the realities of a Church hierarchy in denial, the loneliness and isolation of priests in small communities and the heartbreaking sense of betrayal and confusion in the faithful laity, he comes to a personal crisis in his own vocation. The characters are wonderfully drawn,and realistic. The book reads like a thriller and once I started it, I did not want to put it down.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Rodge TOP 50 REVIEWER on Nov. 11 2009
Format: Hardcover
As soon as you read the sypnosis, you might groan in anticipation of some sordid journey into the loathsome depths of some scumbag religion's dark and dirty cellar. But you would be wrong. This is a book that tries, at least, to be fair about the Catholic church's overall legacy and function, realistically portraying the challenges that come up.

The protagonist is a clean-up man, designated by his bishop to sweep scandal under the rug. MacIntyre does a superb job of taking us inside the mind of this man, showing how his life of suppressing the human dignity of his victim in order to preserve the aura of institutional integrity has slowly drained him. At the same, as an intelligent, emotional being, he realizes this and is beginning to comprehend just how much of an impact his role in life is having. The book is about him slowly groping towards redemption.

The Globe and Mail reviewer put it well I think, when he/she said this book ultimately contains more contrition than redemption.

Also, in spite of the dark subject matter, this book uses suspense ably to compel the reader to turn the pages. So this is a literary book that actually has the potential to appeal to a fairly wide audience. About time, I'd say.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By J. Allan Mcintosh on Sept. 17 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Linden MacIntyre, an award winning author and journalist, has written a novel about a Cape Breton priest, Father Duncan MacAskill, and his life and work in a rural parish on the blessed island. The underlying tension comes from his reputation as the "Bishop's Man" who helps the church avoid scandal by moving troublesome clerics around, away, for treatment etc. But there is much more to this novel which is about a man struggling with himself, his calling, his hopes, memories and dreams. Clergy will recognize many of their own strains and stresses in this story. Lay people will find their own ministries challenged and confirmed. There are wonderful descriptions of the Cape Breton landscape and moods especially for those who live near the ocean. In spite of its dark themes, I ended reading this with a sense of hope and faith in the possibilities of redemption.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Brigid O'Sullivan on Jan. 9 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a story of redemption and contrition rather than an expose of the predatory, paedophilic practices of the Catholic Church. It is different and well done in this respect.

The big 'however' from me is that the timelines are not always very clear and requires too much work from the reader as the writer is sometimes all over the place chronologically.

Many times, whilst reading, I had a sense of mild irritation at this contrivance. Two story-lines I can abide but once it's 3 or 4 the reading pleasure disappears for me.

That said, the writer is talented and has some wondrous turns of phrase and I felt the pain of the abusees. I also like the insider political machinations of the RC church which leaves God very much on the outside looking in. A study in hypocrisy.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By C. Woodley on Nov. 9 2009
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this book immensely. As a Catholic, I was somewhat shocked and certainly disturbed to read about the commonplace nature of the demons that haunt priests. The book drives home the fact that they are men - human beings - and with that, have all the frailties and weaknesses that each of us have. But mostly, I found this a truly fascinating glimpse into the private lives of priests, especially the lonliness and isolation that plague so many of them. By definition, their lives are on the ouside of the bustling family business they oversee in their parishes.

I was drawn to this book and couldn't wait to finish it. When I did, I missed the main characted and still think about him, and the book, often. I highly recommend The Bishop's Man.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sam TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 4 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Bishop's Man by Linden MacIntyre is written in first person, and revolves around a priest named Duncan MacAskill. I was surprised that there was so little discussed about religion considering that it was in the viewpoint of a priest. I neither liked nor disliked the protagonist, which is exactly what I felt about this book. There were many different scenes that started off with people talking, and I would have to guess who they were. A lot of the scenes, I found, were pointless. There were flashbacks to a time when MacAskill had visited the Honduras, to his attempt at a teenage relationship, and of his abusive father. These flashbacks and the problems the protagonist faced made him more human.

Overall, there isn't as much excitement as I was led to believe. Everything is very subtle, everything happens slowly. I was just reading without being amused or fascinated, and for that, I kept getting lost in the words and forgetting what I had just read and then having to reread those sections. Perhaps if I were a Catholic, I would've enjoyed this book more. I don't know.

The priest, Duncan MacAskill, is seen running errands for the Bishop to prevent bad news related to priests from becoming public information. MacAskill meets with those that have been sexually abused by a priest to help cover up the information, reassuring them that something will be done to the abuser, the priest. `Victim' is a word that the Bishop refuses to use because victims are only creations of an over-active imagination. It is the Bishop who says that he wants priests to keep their "noses out of public matters." So that the public will "keep their noses out of ours.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews

Search

Look for similar items by category


Feedback