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The Body Bears the Burden: Trauma, Dissociation, and Disease, Second Edition Paperback – Sep 28 2007


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The Body Bears the Burden: Trauma, Dissociation, and Disease, Second Edition + In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness + Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 302 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 2 edition (Sept. 28 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0789033356
  • ISBN-13: 978-0789033352
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 15.5 x 1.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #301,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4 2004
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book (along with a few others on the subject) initially because I was interested in the topic.
Not a medical person or psychiatrist of any sort, I just thought it was something that I would enjoy looking into. For those that know how the subconscious works, you'll appreciate the fact that I discovered that I was a victim of PTSD while delving into the subject.
It was as if the universe was trying to tell me something. All I can say is that it opened my eyes and changed my life in ways I never knew possible.
For those interested in fiction dealing with a topic along these lines (and also Dissociative Identity Disorder) I would recommend reading a book called "Bark of the Dogwood" by Jackson McCrae. It's an intricate study of PTSD, child abuse, dysfunction, and a little of everything else, and packs quite a wallop. And it's actually quite funny in places--probably the ONLY book I know of about child abuse that has a bright side.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Aug. 15 2004
Format: Paperback
This book, along with WAKING THE TIGER are two of the most useful books I've come across that deal with post traumatic stress disorder. Highly recommended. Would also recommend two works of fiction that deal with this: GOOD GRIEF and THE BARK OF THE DOGWOOD.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By B. Naparstek on June 13 2003
Format: Paperback
Here finally is the neurological basis for the weirdly persistent, highly distressing, ever-cycling symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Don't let the medical terminology stop you from reading this book. It's a stunning revelation to see how physiologically based this syndrome really is, rooted as it is in the survival imperative of the freeze response and it's cognitive partner, dissociation. Makes those diagnostic categories which most of us therapists got trained on pretty irrelevant! I leaned heavily on the fabulous info in this book to write my own chapter on the physiology of PTSD. It's a must read for people with PTSD, their family, friends and counselors.
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By Laura mathews on April 8 2004
Format: Paperback
What insight! I also highly recommend reading Peaceful Heart: A Woman's Journey of Healing, by Aimee Jo Martin....a book that is a true testament to the human spirit and takes the reader thru a client's perspective of getting thru PTSD.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 24 reviews
118 of 118 people found the following review helpful
Explains PTSD Like Nothing Else June 13 2003
By B. Naparstek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Here finally is the neurological basis for the weirdly persistent, highly distressing, ever-cycling symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Don't let the medical terminology stop you from reading this book. It's a stunning revelation to see how physiologically based this syndrome really is, rooted as it is in the survival imperative of the freeze response and it's cognitive partner, dissociation. Makes those diagnostic categories which most of us therapists got trained on pretty irrelevant! I leaned heavily on the fabulous info in this book to write my own chapter on the physiology of PTSD. It's a must read for people with PTSD, their family, friends and counselors.
63 of 67 people found the following review helpful
The body does bear the burden Jan. 30 2006
By Ronald A. Ruden - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When a thoughtful individual takes the time to summarize 30 years of experience, I view this as a great gift. When his insights allow us to help in treatment, it is a blessing. His major thesis is that trauma, when it produces a chronic stress disorder, can manifest in peculair physical ways. This is the key insight and Dr. Scaer backs his observations with lots of clinical and research data. No doubt some will find this a rigorous read, but it is well worth the effort. I had the opportunity to try this theory. A teacher in a rough part of town ( I live in NYC) witnessed in his class a fight where a student viciously punched a girl in the head, when the teacher interevened, the next blow was to the back of his head sending him into the chalk board and breaking his glasses. He presented 5 days later with classic post concussion syndrome of impaired memory, inablility to read and other congnitve deficits. Before I read Dr. Scaer's book, I would have have not been able to treat him, for, from a medical point of view, it was all the brain banging aroung in his skull that caused this. However, Dr. Scaer made me think that this was instead a PTSD from having witnessed a vicious attack. I treated him with EFT and remarkably two days later he was normal! (This would have usually taken many weeks). We are all searching for ways to treat PTSD, but at least we can now view some mystifying symptoms in a model for which hopefully soon we will be able to fix. Kudos, Dr. Scaer.
24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
A tough climb for us non-professionals ... but worth it Aug. 3 2008
By StingTrader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Yes, as other reviewers have noted, this book has lots medical terminology. Yes, parts are repetitive, perhaps written more like a consultant's report than an easily digestible media bite. But the contents are well worth the effort.
I am in therapy, working on trauma issues, and this book brought so much together for me, and served as a guide to issues in my life that are very relevant.
If you're looking for another "flavor of the month" self help book, this is not for you. If you are struggling with PTSD, or think you may be, or are interested in MyoFascial Release, Somatic Experiencing, and other new therapies, this provides a great scientific grounding.
Highly recommended.
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Should be in the library of healthcare providers April 1 2008
By pgp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I like the first edition and this edition is even better!

I work in OB and have seen so many people who have been traumatized by the birth experience- both patients and healthcare givers alike.

I speak on "When Birth Causes Trauma" alot and this is one of the books that I refer my audience to.

This book should be in the library of everyone who deals with patients who have had a traumatic experience and any healthcare giver who has had a traumatic experience.

Paulina Perez, RN, BSN
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Great Validation for Body Centered Therapies Dec 15 2010
By Passionate Therapist - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Scaer is an honest and courageous clinician: when his patients' course of healing did not add up he resisted dismissing them as most doctors had been doing and continue to do. His basic thesis, that emotional suffering is tied up with the autonomic nervous system, gives support to body-based versus cognitive therapies in general. That said, Scaer is oriented very much above the neck, in the brain. The title states 'the body bears the burden' but he himself sees the body as an implement of the mind, a pack-animal if you will, rather than a seat of the person. Also despite emphasizing that trauma is so widespread as almost to be universal, he still seems to consider it an accident or bad luck. That is, he does not deal with social and family dynamics that are systematically traumatizing people in the physiological sense that he describes.

EDIT October 2012: I have just read the authors other book The Trauma Spectrum: Hidden Wounds and Human Resiliency and I saw that he does there get into the 'little traumas' of parenting and social interaction. Because the second edition of this book bears a later copyright than Trauma Spectrum I had assumed there would be nothing in Spectrum that was not here also. I was wrong, read both books.


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