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The Book of Silence Paperback – Sep 3 1987


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Paperback, Sep 3 1987
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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Grafton (Sept. 3 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0586071520
  • ISBN-13: 978-0586071526
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 11.2 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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By A Customer on April 3 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the fourth and final book in the "Lords of Dus" series. A very under-appreciated fantasy series, in my opinion. While these books are neither as intricate nor as well written as many of the big names in fantasy, ("Lord of the Rings" for example) they are well thought out and very original stories with very memorable characters. Entertaining enough to be read several times, but straight-forward enough to be a reasonably quick read.
In this book, the main character, Garth the Overman, unwillingly assists the immortal Forgotten King (the high priest of the god of Death) to work his final magic. Magic that will finally bring an end to his immortality, but may kill many others in the process.
If you've never read the other books in this series, I recommend that you pick up "Lure of the Basilisk", "Seven Altars of Dusarra", and "Sword of Bheleu" first. But if you've read those three already, then I definitely recommend that you pick up this one as well.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
An under appreciated series April 3 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the fourth and final book in the "Lords of Dus" series. A very under-appreciated fantasy series, in my opinion. While these books are neither as intricate nor as well written as many of the big names in fantasy, ("Lord of the Rings" for example) they are well thought out and very original stories with very memorable characters. Entertaining enough to be read several times, but straight-forward enough to be a reasonably quick read.
In this book, the main character, Garth the Overman, unwillingly assists the immortal Forgotten King (the high priest of the god of Death) to work his final magic. Magic that will finally bring an end to his immortality, but may kill many others in the process.
If you've never read the other books in this series, I recommend that you pick up "Lure of the Basilisk", "Seven Altars of Dusarra", and "Sword of Bheleu" first. But if you've read those three already, then I definitely recommend that you pick up this one as well.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Revenge is a Dish Best Fed to Someone Else Feb. 9 2005
By Marc Ruby™ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Garth the Overman has a knock for finding trouble. First an angry basilisk, then a plague on the city of dark Gods, the a sword with an extremely bad temper. Finally, with the damage to Skelleth repaired and trading reestablished, things have returned to a low rumble. Having cause all these crises in the first place, Garth's welcome in the barren northern city was worn thin at best. And the City Council of Ordunin, his original home, felt the same way. Separated from family, with few friends, Garth was reduced to drinking in the same tavern where the King in Yellow lived. The only good thing about being stuck in a room with the high priest of Death was that he rarely said anything.

Garth escapes the tedium by going on a dragon hunt only to discover that the dragon wasn't what he thought it would be and that some things had best be left alone. And on his return to Skelleth he found that the cult of Aghad, the god of hatred and violence, had initiated a program of revenge against Garth. Starting out by torturing and killing his wife. Suddenly what had been a lighthearted story develops fangs as Garth launches his own revenge campaign - one that will totally change the world.

To get what he wants, the return sword of Bheleu, Garth must agree to fetch The Book of Silence from its hiding place in the crypts of Ur-Dormulk. The results of this quest are as expected - Ur-Dormulk is left facing total destruction, Garth gets the sword, the old king gets the book, and the cult of Aghad starts losing large numbers of worshippers. But the story doesn't stop there. Crisis after crisis must be faced right up to the end of time.

As this series has progressed, Watt-Evans has taken what was at first a somewhat humorous adventure story and fleshed it out into a serious piece of fantasy in an era when all to much fantasy was either about magical princesses or sword waving barbarians. In the process he deals with a few interesting theological questions about divine planning and the interruption thereof. The books went on to be great successes in their time, Watt-Evans establish himself as a solid writer, and even today The Lord of Dus is a cult classic. I find that they have lost none of their edge over the years since I first read them. Consider this a strong recommendation.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Dragon and God July 2 2013
By Arthur W. Jordin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Book of Silence (1984) is the fourth Fantasy novel in The Lords of Dus series, following The Sword of Bheleu. The initial volume in this sequence is The Lure of the Basilisk.

In the previous volume, Kyrith was certain that Garth had been held captive by the Baron. She persuaded the City Council of Ordunin to send sixty overman to find Garth. The Baron was in a depressive state when the overmen arrived and would not talk to them. Kyrith decided to lay siege to the town.

Galt came back to Skelleth as co-leader of the group. He didn't have much to do, since Kyrith had taken overall command of the group. He was standing guard in the rain when Saram came out to talk to the overmen.

Garth arrived the following day with Frima and Koros. He also had the Sword of Bheleu, the powerful token of the god of destruction. Since he had lost his other weapons, the Sword was his only means of defense.

Garth already had anger management issues. The Sword kept him at a low level of anger whenever he was near it. The pommel glowed bright red while it was manipulating him.

Garth was extremely angry at the news that the overmen were besieging Skelleth. He sent the first overman that he encountered off to gather the others and take them back to the camp. Then Garth faced his wife and told her that laying siege to Skelleth was an act of war.

In this novel,Garth is an overman. He is a humanoid taller and stronger than a man. He is the Prince of Ordunin -- a port city in the far north -- and Lord of the Overmen of the Northern Waste. He is married to three overwomen and has many children.

Kyrith is Garth's senior wife. They have no children.

The Forgotten King is an immortal man from long ago. He lives in the King's Inn within the village of Skelleth.

Saram is a former Lieutenant in the guard of the Baron of Skelleth. He had been discharged from the guard for insubordination.

Frima is a young maiden of Dusarra who had been taken by the followers of Sai -- the goddess of pain and suffering -- and tortured by the priests. Garth had rescued her from the altar and took her with him.

Haggat is the Chief Priest of Aghad, the god of hatred, fear, and loathing. The primary temple is within Dusarra.

Koros is Garth's warbeast. He is a mixture of the breeds of cat, dog and donkey. The warbeast is as tall as a large human, but weighs much more.

In this story, Garth is waiting in the King's Inn in Skelleth for news. He has favorable relations with the local authorities, but has heard nothing from the City Council of Ordunin or from the High King at Kholis. He is not expecting the next caravan from Ordunin for several weeks.

Garth is bored, so he goes over to talk with the Forgotten King. At first, the old man ignores him. Finally, the King gives him a task to do just to rid himself of the annoying overman. Scrying on this conversation from Dusarra, Haggat prepares his vengeance.

Garth gathers supplies and rides out on Koros. As he rides south, Garth notices widespread signs of fighting. When he reaches Orgul, the land is green and untouched by war. He also doesn't see any signs of the dragon he has come to slay.

As he nears the forest, a man comes out and waves for his attention. Garth approaches him on Koros. The man says nothing for a while as he stares at the overman and his warbeast. Obviously he has never seen anything like them.

Recovering to his purpose, the man warns Garth to stay away. The dragon is loose and may well cook him with its breath and then consume him. Despite all his efforts, Garth rides on.

Coming upon a town, Garth rides through and finds little of interest. Yet the last shop on the street has ingenious toys. He stops and goes in to look at the inventory. He leaves with a mechanical bird that flies.

Riding on further, he sees the dragon fly overhead. Then it swoops on him and even breaths flame at him. Finally it leaves and the overman considers his observations.

This tale takes Garth back to Skelleth. He finds Kyrith dead. Then Haggat sends a vision of Aghad to state that she has been an offering to the god.

Garth decides that the cult of Aghad should be entirely destroyed. This is the last volume in the series. An omnibus edition -- The Lords of Dus -- with all four novels in this sequence is now available.

Highly recommended for Watt-Evans fans and for anyone else who enjoys tales of magical mutations, Warring gods, and virtually no romance. Read and enjoy!

-Arthur W. Jordin
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Like the rest of the entries in this series... July 30 2002
By createdfree - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
it's strangely, but compulsively, readable. Evans displays his usual talent for strong, realisic characters set in a world that's interesting and makes sense.

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