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The Brazilian Sound: Samba, Bossa Nova, and the Popular Music of Brazil (New) [Hardcover]

Chris McGowan , Ricardo Pessanha
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)

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Product Description

From Library Journal

Two new books on popular music present contrasting approaches to the diverse world of Hispanic music. Aparicio's (Spanish and American culture, Univ. of Michigan) work, aimed at an academic audience, deals with salsa and Puerto Rican culture in a feminist context. McGowan, targeting a general audience, presents a comprehensive history of popular music in Brazil. Aparicio analyzes salsa, boleros, and other popular musical forms in terms of cultural issues (race, gender, class), drawing on her own experiences, and those of typical listeners, to explore these issues. Readers may find their views on salsa altered by reading this book. A recommended choice for academic Hispanic studies collections and for music collections with a strong Hispanic emphasis. McGowan and Pessanha here update their original edition (Billboard Bks., 1991), bringing their extensive experience writing on Brazilian popular music for Billboard and other magazines to this extensive survey covering local jazz and rock as well as better-known forms. The accessible writing style and lavish use of illustrations help achieve the authors' goal of inspiring interest in this music. Updates cover recent music and musicians, provide more social analysis, and expand the discography to 1000 titles, adding much to the original edition. The best work on the topic, this is recommended for both academic and public library music collections.?James E. Ross, WLN, Seattle
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

 "Well informed, written in plain language and smartly illustrated, The Brazilian Sound quickly became a reference book after it was published in 1991. With the recent publication of a revised and expanded edition, the good just got better...The Brazilian Sound is an informative primer, clearly designed to be useful to the curious beginner, but also substantive enough to capture and hold the attention of the initiated. This new edition retains the easy-to-read quality of the original while adding not only new artists throughout but also historical and social context to the music.... For anyone interested in exploring the vast world of Brazilian music, The Brazilian Sound will serve nicely as a smart and practical road map." --Jazziz, February 2009



 

"An excellent resource on some of the most popular music in Brazil.... Clearly written and offering information valuable for understanding Brazilian music in general.... Anyone interested in the evolution of Brazilian popular music and some of its most prolific artists of the past centuries will appreciate this title. Summing Up: Highly recommended." --Choice, June 2009



“[T]his book has been revised and expanded again to be bigger and better than the previous highly praised incarnations. Ten years on, the music is still evolving, with many new artists and hybridizations, and McGowan and Pessanha are certainly keeping up with the changes. Their book features new coverage of funk, rap, and hip-hop and profiles new samba artists as well as artists on the rise in electronic dance music and other genres. Now that the Internet has made it easier to find and explore once-exotic musical genres, people looking for information about all the kinds of music in Brazil will love this book. Lavishly illustrated with 175 black-and-white photos, 12 maps, and 12 figures, it covers the remarkable breadth of Brazilian music in a highly readable, lively manner. Highly recommended for all public libraries and world music collections, even those owning an earlier edition."
Library Journal

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

Here is an illustrated guide to the rich music of Brazil—its history, styles, performers, instruments, and impact on musicians around the globe. From the boisterous rhythms of samba to the cool elegance of bossa nova to the hot percussion of Bahian axé music, The Brazilian Sound celebrates a world music phenomenon. This revised and expanded edition includes discussions of developments in samba and other key genres, the rise of female singer-songwriters in recent years, new works by established artists like Milton Nascimento and Marisa Monte, and the mixing of bossa with electronica. This clearly written and lavishly illustrated encyclopedic survey features new entries and photographs, an extensive glossary of Brazilian music terms and more.

This edition of The Brazilian Sound contains new discussions of: 

·  música sertaneja and música caipira
·  Brazilian funk, rap/hip-hop, and electronic dance music
·  important new samba and MPB artists
·  Plus! An updated bibliography and glossary, and a list of Web resources


 

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

An encyclopedia survey of Brazilian popular music --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Inside Flap

"This book, the first of its kind, is much more than a pioneering work...The Brazilian Sound is both an enthusiastic introduction for the newcomer and a thoughtful analysis for the confirmed fan." —Alan Ryan, The Beat

"An informed, useful introduction to Brazilian music." —Fernando Gonzalez, Boston Globe

"A great panoramic description of the whole Brazilian musical scene." —Antonio Adolfo, Brazilian composer and music teacher

"An excellent book." —Don Heckman, Los Angeles Times --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

At the second International Song Festival in 1967, Milton Nascimento had three songs accepted for competition. He had no intention of performing them—he hated the idea of intense competition. In fact, Nascimento might never have appeared at all if Eumir Deodato hadn't threatened not to write the arrangements for his songs if he didn't perform at least two of them. Nascimento went on to win the festival's best performer award, all three of his songs were included soon afterward on his first album, and the rest is history.

This is only one anecdote from The Brazilian Sound, an encyclopedic survey of Brazilian popular music that ranges over samba, bossa nova, MPB, jazz and instrumental music and tropical rock, as well as the music of the Northeast. The authors have interviewed a wide variety of performers like Nascimento, Gilberto Gil, Carlinhos Brown, and Airto Moreira; U.S. fans, like Lyle Mays, George Duke, and Paul Winter; executive Andre Midani; and music historian Zuza Homen de Mello, just to name a few.

First published in 1991, The Brazilian Sound received enthusiastic attention both in the United States and abroad. For this new edition, the authors have expanded their examination of the historical roots of Brazilian music, added new photographs, amplified their discussion of social issues like racism, updated the maps, and added a new final chapter highlighting the most recent trends in Brazilian music. The authors have expanded their coverage of the axe music movement and included profiles of significant emerging artists like Marisa Monte, Chico Cesar, and Daniela Mercury.

Clearly written and lavishly illustrated with 167 photographs, The Brazilian Sound is packed with facts, explanations, and fascinating stories. For the Latin music aficionado or the novice who wants to learn more, the book also provides a glossary, a bibliography, and an extensive discography containing 1,000 entries. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Chris McGowanhas written about Brazilian music forBillboard,Musicianand many other publications, and contributed toThe Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture. He blogs for theHuffington Postabout Brazil and other subjects.

Ricardo Pessanhahas worked as a Brazilian music consultant for foreign journalists, music producers and filmmakers and as a music lecturer for academic programs. He has been a translator and publicity writer for recording companies in Brazil and contributed articles toThe Beatand other publications.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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