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The Broken Window: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel [Abridged, Audiobook] [Audio CD]

Jeffery Deaver , Dennis Boutsikaris
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

June 1 2010 Lincoln Rhyme Novels

Bestselling master of suspense Jeffery Deaver is back with a brand-new Lincoln Rhyme thriller.

Lincoln Rhyme and partner/paramour Amelia Sachs return to face a criminal whose ingenious staging of crimes is enabled by a terrifying access to information....

When Lincoln's estranged cousin Arthur Rhyme is arrested on murder charges, the case is perfect -- too perfect. Forensic evidence from Arthur's home is found all over the scene of the crime, and it looks like the fate of Lincoln's relative is sealed.

At the behest of Arthur's wife, Judy, Lincoln grudgingly agrees to investigate the case. Soon Lincoln and Amelia uncover a string of similar murders and rapes with perpetrators claiming innocence and ignorance -- despite ironclad evidence at the scenes of the crime. Rhyme's team realizes this "perfect" evidence may actually be the result of masterful identity theft and manipulation.

An information service company -- the huge data miner Strategic Systems Datacorp -- seems to have all the answers but is reluctant to help the police. Still, Rhyme and Sachs and their assembled team begin uncovering a chilling pattern of vicious crimes and coverups, and their investigation points to one master criminal, whom they dub "522."

When "522" learns the identities of the crime-fighting team, the hunters become the hunted. Full of Deaver's trademark plot twists, The Broken Window will put the partnership of Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs to the ultimate test.

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From Publishers Weekly

In bestseller Deaver's entertaining eighth Lincoln Rhyme novel (after The Cold Moon), Rhyme, a forensic consultant for the NYPD, and his detective partner, Amelia Sachs, take on a psychotic mastermind who uses data mining—the business of the twenty-first century—not only to select and hunt down his victims but also to frame the crimes on complete innocents. Rhyme is reluctantly drawn into a case involving his estranged cousin, Arthur, who's been charged with first-degree murder. But when Rhyme and his crew look into the strange set of circumstances surrounding his cousin's alleged crime, they discover tangential connections to a company that specializes in collecting and analyzing consumer data. Further investigation leads them to some startlingly Orwellian revelations: Big Brother is watching your every move and could be a homicidal maniac. The topical subject matter makes the story line particularly compelling, while longtime fans will relish Deaver's intimate exploration of a tragedy from Rhyme's adolescence. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

Another corker ... precision-engineered to keep the reader turning the pages without a hitch Evening Standard One of the great detective teams of contemporary crime fiction come storming back ... Deaver never disappoints, and this novel shines Mark Timlin in Independent on Sunday --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommend , Lincoln Ryme Series May 10 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Good read suspenseful right to the end , Jeffery Deavery one of our favorite authors. Can't wait for the next novel
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Crime from Today's Headlines July 7 2008
By Luanne Ollivier #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Lincoln Rhyme, Amelia Sachs and crew are back in the 7th book of this series by Jeffery Deaver.

Lincoln's estranged cousin, Arthur Rhyme is arrested on murder and rape charges. He claims he is innocent. Against his wishes, his wife Judy contacts Lincoln for help.

For those of you unfamiliar with this series, Lincoln Rhyme is a former police captain, injured on the job and now a quadriplegic. Amelia Sachs was a young aspiring policewoman who became Rhymes eyes as she "walked" crime scenes, gathering evidence for him. Together they have solved many crimes based on Lincoln's expertise with forensic evidence.

And that is what bothers Lincoln about Arthur's case - the evidence is just too perfect. The case seems airtight.

Some digging unearths two other cases similar to Arthur's. Further investigation leads to SSD - a data mining corporation. It seems the real perpetrator might be hiding behind walls of SSD.

Data mining is real and very scary. When you get to page 352, there's a dossier put together on one of the characters, listing literally everything. Purchases, habits, relationships, financial data, lifestyle, communications and lots more. It's quite frightening - think of all the loyalty cards you have, the debit and credit cards you swipe, the searches you do on the web.

The perpetrator is using this information to commit crimes and have someone else take the fall. He's always one step ahead of the police. Then he starts messing with their personal information and things take a turn for the worse.

The novel opens, closes and contains references to a case involving an assassin the Lincoln last encountered in 'The Cold Moon'. If you've not read it yet, you might find these references a bit confusing.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
"1984" and "Brave New World" gave us a brief glimpse of the world they feared we were creating but "The Broken Window" takes it over the top. Every reader will shiver as they come to grips with the realization of just how much the state likely knows about their life.

In "The Broken Window", Jeffrey Deaver has pitted Lincoln Rhyme, his famous paraplegic forensic consultant, against his most elusive foe to date - "Unsub 522", a deeply disturbed obsessive-compulsive hoarder, an ingenious data-miner, a psychopathic serial killer and "the man who knows everything". The chilling theme of this novel is data - information, storage and retrieval, tracking, privacy, identity and just who has access to what. Unsub 522 is an ingenious master of the dreaded crime of the 21st century - identity theft! He steals data, reconstructs people's lives, destroys some information, rearranges the rest and is even capable of planting legitimate evidence framing an unsuspecting victim for his own brutal serial murders. Arthur Rhyme, Lincoln's estranged cousin, is one of these victims. When he is arrested, his wife pleads with Lincoln to investigate. She and Lincoln both know that, despite the overwhelming evidence against him, Arthur is not the killer that the police suspect him to be.

If you have ever experienced a frisson of paranoia about who is looking over your shoulder, you might want to think twice about reading "The Broken Window". If you insist on reading Deaver's novel despite my warning, your little shiver will blossom into a full blown fear that will sit in the pit of your stomach and keep you awake at nights wondering who is looking into the metaphorical windows of your life.

In short, "The Broken Window" is a first rate thriller with a gut-wrenching theme.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  209 reviews
86 of 92 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Feints, old villians and new discoveries June 13 2008
By ellen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I have been a fan of the Lincoln Rhyme books from day one. The brilliant Detective, who suffered the same type of injury as the late Christopher Reeve, has now gone through some experimental work that has more feeling in his fingers, and body, but is still dependant on his electric wheelchair. His lady, cop Amelia Sachs, is his feet and body as she searches for clues by 'working the grid' of crime scenes and their love for each other transcends a man who cannot walk and a young lady who can try to be part of helping and learning as well as loving this man.
The Broken Window deals with Identity Theft. If you've never been touched by Identity Theft, count yourself lucky - it is a terrible violation and you have to spend a lot of time getting your life back in order. A brilliant villian, slowly takes over the lives of respectible men and women and he plays with them like a spider with a fly in her web. He can take their identities, ruin their credit, discredit professionals so they cannot practise their arts, even drive them to suicide. Oh yes, he also likes to kill them too.
So starts a game of cat and mouse with Rhyme and co. and a brilliant mastermind. What we learn is maybe TMI - too much information about the subject - we are numbers - everything we purchase on the Internet can be accessed and information sold/given to others to contact you to be interested in their products. You get on mailing lists and then get really weird junk mail and you find it all ties back to a purchase you made on the Internet. It sounds like I'm talking about John Twelve Hawks, in the Traveler, but it's Deaver's crafty touch.
He also does not let us forget 2 major projects of his - the continuing saga of The Watchmaker, and he gives us several healthy doses of references to Kathryn Dance, the kinesthics specialist in California that was introduced in a Rhyme book.
The book was as always excellent, dealing with this person tossing, Lincoln's once close cousin into a tailspin accused of murder, and Rhyme's memories of their closeness, and what happened that makes Lincoln continually think - what might have happened if...?
The reason I give it 4 stars is Deaver goes into SOOOOO much information on the subject that it is almost overwhelming. Yes you get the point. But I am not writing a paper on the subject.
It is a fascinating, frightening subject, and again, another fine Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs adventure.
Just keep an eye on your credit rating!
35 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 'Learning' Experience June 18 2008
By Richard B. Schwartz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
In the newest of the Lincoln Rhyme novels, Jeffery Deaver explores the world of identity fraud and the fact that there are people out there learning things about us that we are unlikely to want them to know. At the same time, he shows the ways in which they are doing this--the security issues which they face, the volume of computer memory required for the task and the precise sorts of information which they seek. Needless to say, this is as creepy as it is contemporary.

There are two villains at work--one at the periphery of the story, a man faced by Rhyme in the past, and one at the center, known to Rhyme and the members of his team as 522 (who recently struck on 5/22). Since he refers to all of them by number as well, this is appropriate.

The focus here is on forensics and computers, with a dash of abnormal psychology. The villain is plausible, nasty, and in for a major confrontation, though not quite the confrontation he might have expected. Amelia is in danger and Linc must rush to her aid in the only ways open to him. The world of the data-mining company is very nicely realized and just as weird, alienating, and plausible as we might fear. This is prime Rhyme, with a driving plot, an excellent ensemble cast, and even the chance to learn more about the private Rhyme, since his cousin Arthur is one of 522's victims. Linc must save everyone--relatives as well as loved ones--in this case. Structurally, the ending is different from what we usually expect in a Deaver novel, but I will save the details lest I spoil it for readers. Highly recommended.
25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Started out great, good subject, but got tedious about halfway through Sept. 19 2008
By hawthorne wood - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The author tackles a very important contemporary issue in this book, and it was a real page-turner until about halfway through when nothing really new was happening. For one thing, Rhyme is a rather boring character. He's got one emotion: cranky. I can see nothing to attract a beautiful woman like his current partner. He doesn't have an ounce of charm, and we all know a strong woman won't be with a man who is devoid of it. So there's no "chemistry" there whatsoever. The story was fun when it was a true "who-dunnit" but when the author started using clever little ploys to fool us into thinking we had the guy, then it turned out to be someone else, I felt a little cheated and it felt very blah-blah-blah, gimme a break. And then, when the person it really was turned out to be sort of a deus ex machina - from out of nowhere and a dull nowhere at that...I guess I just lost interest and wished the book would end. Also, two side stories could have been really juicy, but they fell short: the one about Pam and her married teacher boyfriend. That came to a dead halt. Then the story about Rhyme's cousin Arthur: I wanted to actually experience the cousins making it up in the end. But then, since Rhyme is such a one-note johnny, I can't imagine how a reunion would have been very rich anyway. Let's put it this way: Deaver could take note of Dave Robicheaux, Matthew Scudder and Easy Rawlins, protagonists with depth, and inner lives heartfelt by the reader.
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars George Orwell and Aldous Huxley are spinning in their graves! Oct. 25 2008
By Paul Weiss - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
"1984" and "Brave New World" gave us a brief glimpse of the world they feared we were creating but "The Broken Window" takes it over the top. Every reader will shiver as they come to grips with the realization of just how much the state likely knows about their life.

In "The Broken Window", Jeffrey Deaver has pitted Lincoln Rhyme, his famous paraplegic forensic consultant, against his most elusive foe to date - "Unsub 522", a deeply disturbed obsessive-compulsive hoarder, an ingenious data-miner, a psychopathic serial killer and "the man who knows everything". The chilling theme of this novel is data - information, storage and retrieval, tracking, privacy, identity and just who has access to what. Unsub 522 is an ingenious master of the dreaded crime of the 21st century - identity theft! He steals data, reconstructs people's lives, destroys some information, rearranges the rest and is even capable of planting legitimate evidence framing an unsuspecting victim for his own brutal serial murders. Arthur Rhyme, Lincoln's estranged cousin, is one of these victims. When he is arrested, his wife pleads with Lincoln to investigate. She and Lincoln both know that, despite the overwhelming evidence against him, Arthur is not the killer that the police suspect him to be.

If you have ever experienced a frisson of paranoia about who is looking over your shoulder, you might want to think twice about reading "The Broken Window". If you insist on reading Deaver's novel despite my warning, your little shiver will blossom into a full blown fear that will sit in the pit of your stomach and keep you awake at nights wondering who is looking into the metaphorical windows of your life.

In short, "The Broken Window" is a first rate thriller with a gut-wrenching theme. But Deaver has also gone above and beyond the call of duty as an author and has brought his protagonists into the real world with a characterization and history that almost brought tears to my eyes. We learn the story of Lincoln Rhyme's father and his brilliant uncle. We discover why he hasn't spoken to his cousin for years. And have you ever wondered about the idea of a paraplegic having sex? In an absolutely fabulous sidebar that doesn't have the slightest scintilla of prurient voyeurism about it, Deaver explains how a paraplegic is capable of a loving relationship that includes a fully functional sexual relationship.

Highly recommended and then some!

Paul Weiss
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Someone knows "everything" about you.... June 11 2008
By Theresa A. Betros - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Rhyme and Sachs follow evidence. However, a clever killer finds out all he needs to know about his victim and his "fall guy" and "plants" conclusive evidence that wrongly convicts the innocent, the latest "murderer" being Arthur Rhyme, Lincoln's estranged cousin.

Killer "522" is brilliant. He has Amelia, Lon Selitto and Ron Pulaski all fighting for their careers and their family. He picks apart the team, one at a time. "522" knows everything about them; including how to hurt them, and their family. Endless virtual data leads to a real killer, who knows how to turn the pressure on those who are hunting him.

Like every Rhyme/Sachs book, this book also contains subplots; including one clever nemesis who escaped Rhyme, but continues to taunt him. Hopefully, there will be sequel and a final confrontation.

You will not be able to put this book down.
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