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The Bromeliad (Truckers Omnibus Edition) Paperback – Apr 15 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 569 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; Truckers Omnibus Edition edition (April 15 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552546070
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552546072
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 3.3 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #240,057 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"As always, [Terry Pratchett] is head and shoulders above even the best of the rest. He is screamingly funny. He is wise. He has style ... Splendid" Daily Telegraph "Terry Pratchett once again succeeds in combining a subtle blend of humour, wisdom and naive simplicity" The School Librarian

From the Back Cover

TRUCKERS To the thousands of tiny nomes living under the floorboards of a large department store, there is no Outside. No Day or Night, no Sun or Rain. They're just daft old legends. Until the devastating news that the Store is to be demolished. Now the nomes have to think. And they have to think BIG...

DIGGERS A Bright New Dawn is just around the corner for the nomes when they move into an abandoned quarry. Or is it? For when humans turn up, they begin to mess everything up again. Now the nomes have two choices: to run, or to hide. Or maybe, they could... fight. But for how long can they keep the humans at bay - even with the help of the monster Jekub?

WINGS It's a ridiculous plan. Impossible. To hitch a ride on a truck with wings - Concorde. And then steal one of those space shuttle things. But home is home, and the nomes want to get there. They don't mean to cause any trouble. Really...

Hilariously inventive, marvellously witty and highly original, Truckers, Diggers and Wings form a magnificent trilogy of tales about a race of little people struggling to survive in a world full of humans: the Bromeliad trilogy. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By david lykens on Nov. 18 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is the first Pratchett book I have ever read. It has sat on my shelf for 10 years, & I finally read it. I can't believe I waited so long. It was soooo funny. I never wanted to put it down, or to stop reading it. I wish that he had continued his tales of the nomes. I was just smiling so much as I read the book. How the simple things in life can be so easily twisted around & taken for their face value is so amusing. If you like humor with a good story, then this is the book for you. It is supposed to be a childrens story, but I find that to be far from the truth. It is a book for everyone of every age.
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Format: Hardcover
I've never been a huge Pratchett fan. His science fiction books are good enough if I don't have anything else on my list although quite frankly I enjoy paging through this internet Pratchett annotations site. The late Douglas Adams's works are snappier and less dated--I ame in awe of Adams's devastation of heavy metal music in a chapter or two, but Pratchett took rather longer to slam a genre or two in _Soul Music_.
Except for the _Bromeliad Trilogy_ where in 400 pages of gentle humor Pratchett shows that you don't need to go into outer space to create a new world. It's a story of nomes, who are four inches tall but move ten times as fast as humans. Their deity is Arnold Bros.(1905) because that's what it says on the store window outside where they live. We find out they have a sort of Bible(quotes make headers for the chapter) and also try to discover signs from Arnold Bros. (one says "If You Do Not See What You Require, Please Ask.")
But one day they find out the store(which some sects think encompass the whole world) is about to be demolished, and this takes us on a journey where everyday human conveniences are objects of wonder. Part of the fun of reading is to see how soon on the page you can figure out the object described. The other part is watching their faith in Arnold Bros. buffeted as they learn about humans, our language and conventions we take for granted, technology, and nature in Diggers(another dramatic escape at the end) before a climactic meeting with Grandson Richard, 39, in Wings.
I can't say this is indicative of Pratchett's work, but it is certainly my clear favorite at about the same length as a Discworld novel with at least as much drama and humor.
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By Sparky Malarky on Nov. 23 1999
Format: Hardcover
I recently read this book and found it utterly charming. It was the first work by Pratchett I read that was not a Diskworld novel. I found the same dry wit and wonderful humor in The Bromeliad. It was written for younger readers, and like all good juvenile fiction, it is a story that is told on several levels--easy enough for young readers, but compelling enough for adults.
The story is about a family of "nomes" who meet a large population of nomes living in a department store, which they believe to be the whole world. Adventures follow, and the hero must struggle against "nomish nature" as much as against the wide world. Of course, like most good fantasy, there are plenty of parallels to real life, but the author doesn't need to hit the reader over the head with them. As for the title, a bromelaid is a flower that grows in the rain forest. How is that related to 4 inch high people in England? Read the book to see how the author ties it all together.
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By Brian Ashe on Oct. 11 2010
Format: Paperback
Pratchett fans beware. This is not Discworld.

But Terry Pratchett it is, this story of the tiny nomes who are about to lose their home. Not just their home, but the provision of all their needs: a department store that is their entire universe. The incredibly detailed and very funny story of their escape and eventual trip into space was originally published in three rather short books. This omnibus edition makes a medium to long single book that you'll want to finish in one reading. And then read again.

I remember reading a news story about three kids about three years old who drove a car out into the street: one pushed on the accelerator, another turned the steering wheel, and the third moved the gearshift lever. Nomes are way smaller than three year old kids. Also way smaller than the Wee Free Men. So how many nomes does it take to fly a Concorde? A lot more than three. Read it and find out. You won't regret it.
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