The Brothers Karamazov and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 16.93
  • List Price: CDN$ 27.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 10.07 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Brothers Karamazov Hardcover – Jan 23 1996


See all 44 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 16.93
CDN$ 16.93 CDN$ 8.27

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this book with Animal Farm and 1984 CDN$ 15.99

The Brothers Karamazov + Animal Farm and 1984
Price For Both: CDN$ 32.92

One of these items ships sooner than the other. Show details

  • This item: The Brothers Karamazov

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Animal Farm and 1984

    Usually ships within 3 to 5 weeks.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Modern Library; New edition edition (Jan. 23 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679601813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679601814
  • Product Dimensions: 21.2 x 14.6 x 4.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 885 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #202,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Alexey Fyodorovitch Karamazov was the third son of Fyodor Pavlovitch Karamazov, a landowner well known in our district in his own day, and still remembered among us owing to his gloomy and tragic death, which happened thirteen years ago, and which I shall describe in its proper place. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sergey Vasilev on Dec 28 2006
Format: Paperback
THE BROTHERS KARAMAZOV, which is one of Dostoyevsky's all time best, perhaps the best, adds to make him perhaps the best writer of all times. The author came up with so many great ideas and characters that are so real to life even in their complex emotions and rationales that we relate to the characters as if we are in their heads. In the end, not only do we have a great story, we are also left with a beautifully written work of political, psychological, sociological, ethical and psychological thought that is very true not only to Russia, but to other lands and peoples as well.

The greatest soul writer of all times and great contributor to human psychology successfully created a beautiful and amazing dynamism between the Karamazov brothers that has been the core of many stories after involving siblings. There is the unreliable father, the old Fyodor Karamazov whose life dominates his sons and whose death casts a huge shadow on their future.

Sensual Alyosha who is the youngest of the Karamazov brothers is the main character of the story, and he is noted for his strong faith in god and humanity, deep kindness and sense of sacrifice.

Ivan the atheist has a sharp mind and is the critical analyzer who seeks for meaning in everything. He is skeptical and dwells more on rationale in his dealing with people and issues. In the end, his intellectual mind misleads him and opens the doors to the nightmares in his life.

Dmitry is the sensitive brother who has a strong consideration for anything living, Smerdyakov their half-brother, is the cunning illegitimate son of old Fyodor Karamazov and works as Fyodor's servant.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. Haensel on July 19 2007
Format: Paperback
Great Book Bad Translation, Jul 20 2007

I have read this translation of BK as well as one by David Magarshack, and a new one by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhinsky. The recent translation by Pevear and Volokhinsky is much much better than this one by Constance Garnett (which is better than Magarshack's)

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhnsky are ideal translators for Dostoevsky (he has a PhD in Russian Literature from London and is a native English speaker, she studied literature in Russia and is a native Russian speaker), they live together in France and decided to retranslate this work after she read an English translation and, knowing the Russian original, was disgusted by the translation. Their translation won a Pen/Book-of-the-Month-Club Translation Prize.

Brothers Karamazov is a good book by any translation, but is elevated to one of the peaks of modern fiction by Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation, pass this edition up and by their translation...it's worth the extra pennies.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. Haensel on July 19 2007
Format: Paperback
I have read this translation of BK as well as one by David Magarshack, and a new one by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhinsky. The recent translation by Pevear and Volokhinsky is much much better than this one by Constance Garnett (which is better than Magarshack's)

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhnsky are ideal translators for Dostoevsky (he has a PhD in Russian Literature from London and is a native English speaker, she studied literature in Russia and is a native Russian speaker), they live together in France and decided to retranslate this work after she read an English translation and, knowing the Russian original, was disgusted by the translation. Their translation won a Pen/Book-of-the-Month-Club Translation Prize.

Brothers Karamazov is a good book by any translation, but is elevated to one of the peaks of modern fiction by Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation, pass this edition up and by their translation...it's worth the extra pennies.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By David Vella on May 5 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book took me three months to read but it was well worth it. The character development and plot will not let you put this book down. I could see the traits of the characters in many people I have meet throughout my like. I highly recommend it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
The Brothers Karamazov is a magnificent piece of literature. Anyone the least bit familiar with Fyodor Dostoevsky will easily spot his hand at work here, which means some familiar ground for readers of other works by the author. This is not at all negative, however; this volume overflows with illuminating, thought-provoking Dostoevsky ideas.
The Constance Garnett translation is somewhat awkward; I find Garnett overly monotonous and convoluted. Though Dostoevsky is no quick nor casual read, his text was certainly confused in some of Garnett's meandering passages. I feel other translators do a more concise and entertaining job, while keeping the same ideas intact, though I've only briefly read other translations.
To give evidence to my critique, the notes on translation in the back of my text indicate some issues, including the title itself! Instead of "The Brothers Karamazov," the book should probably be "The Karamazov Brothers." As editor Ralph E. Matlaw states, "we do not refer to 'the brothers Kennedy'," and I'll mention "the sisters Hilton." On the bright side, I feel the strange title makes the book feel more "foreign" and exotic.
Matlaw also states Garnett doesn't just confuse the reader with some language, but actually simplifies and cleans up other language, turning at least one character into a more polished version than Doestoevsky probably intended. Thankfully, Garnett's peculiarities become familiar and comfortable. Overall, this book is sufficiently readable.
Of note to first-time Dostoevsky readers is the extreme number of characters quickly introduced near the beginning of the book, with the traditional cavalcade of Russian names, surnames, and nicknames.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback