The Buddha in the Attic and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 27.20
  • List Price: CDN$ 34.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.80 (20%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Buddha in the Attic Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
"Please retry"
CDN$ 27.20
CDN$ 27.20 CDN$ 20.70

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (Aug. 23 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 030794073X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307940735
  • Product Dimensions: 15 x 13 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 68 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #928,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Louise Jolly TOP 50 REVIEWER on May 1 2012
Format: Hardcover
Story Description:

Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction
National Book Award and Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalist
A New York Time Notable Book

A gorgeous novel by the celebrated author of When the Emperor Was Divine that tells the story of young women brought from Japan to San Francisco as "picture brides" nearly a century ago. In eight unforgettable sections, The Buddha in the Attic traces the extraordinary lives of these women, from their arduous journeys by boat, to their arrival in San Francisco and their tremulous first nights as new wives; from their experiences raising children who would later reject their culture and language, to the deracinating arrival of war. Once again, Julie Otsuka has written a spellbinding novel about identity and loyalty, and what it means to be an American in uncertain times.

My Review:

A group of young women from Japan are on a boat headed for San Francisco to meet their new husbands. They are picture brides, arranged marriages by a matchmaker Little did they know that the photo's they had been sent in Japan were 20 years old and the beautifully written letters they received from their new "American husbands" weren't from them at all. They were from people hired to write the letters that were full of promises but all lies. The men were not teachers, bankers and other career men but instead simple roaming farm hands.

The first night they were met at the boat, their new husbands walked them gently and carefully until under the cover of darkness in hotel rooms were the sexual contact was rough, painful, and indecent. Their hopes and dreams for a better life in America were soon dashed.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Filled with collective voices yet the singular experience from each voice is bound to resonate with different readers. From the most mundane to the most complex of emotions, well captured.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Ami on Jan. 27 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book tells a story and fate of a very special group of people who came to the US in the early 1900.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Kirti on Sept. 23 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is a novel. I have just started reading it. It seems quite interesting it. It is a story of Japanese mail brides coming to join their husbands in America.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
This book was a surprise for me in many ways. Firstly, like many of my reads this year, it was not something I would have chosen for myself, however being the Book Club’s choice for June, I opted to read it and see where it took me, and I am happy to report that I found a rare gem of a book that will be making a permanent home on my bookshelf on my next trip to the local bookstore. The larger surprises for me were the style of writing the author made use of and the story itself.

The writing did not follow any format that I had experienced previous to opening the cover of this book, it is told in the first person plural and does not offer the reader a main character, or a specific story to follow, and I admit a few pages in I was admittedly confused as to where this book was heading, mainly as it seemed to be lacking the main character to which I normally attach…

A few pages later I began to see that the “main character” is the “we” of the book, and once adjusted to the style and layout of the story, the “we“ caught my interest and the tale of these young women from Japan began to unfold The writing is poetic (though not poetry) in places but also very straightforward, if perhaps a bit formal, yet really leaves little to the imagination. When reading the section titled “First Night” for example, I was struck by Otsuka’s ability to tell the “taking” of these young women by their husbands in a straightforward and very honest way, without any of the romantic fanciful words you‘d expect, but just straightforward, this is what happened, language.…

"That night our new husbands took us quickly. They took us calmly. The took us gently, but firmly and without saying a word….They took us flat on our backs on the bare floor of the Minute Motel.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback