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The Camera Killer Paperback – Jul 17 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 115 pages
  • Publisher: AmazonCrossing; Original edition (July 17 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1612183239
  • ISBN-13: 978-1612183237
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 14 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,015,103 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Thomas Glavinic is an influential Austrian novelist. Born in 1972, he is considered a guiding voice in Austrian literature. He’s written several novels and has won both critical acclaim and commercial success, winning prizes and topping Austria’s bestseller list. The Camera Killer won the Friedrich-Glauser Prize for crime fiction in 2002 and Glavinic was shortlisted for the German Book Prize in 2007. Pull Yourself Together reached number one on both the Austrian bestseller list and the Austrian Radio and Television critics’ list.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 66 reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Not a pretty picture July 5 2012
By mrliteral - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I suppose the great success of Stieg Larsson and his Lisbeth Salander books has created a hunger for European mysteries. Scandanavia, of course, is the big draw, with Larsson, Henning Mankell, Jo Nesbo and others leading the pack. But Austria is bound to prosper from this as well. Hence, there is a good chance of success for Thomas Glavinic and his novel, The Camera Killer.

Does it deserve this success? Well, before I get into the quality of the book, I should first point out that this is really more of a novella, barely topping 100 pages; typically, I prefer a little more "meat" to my books, and I don't think I'm alone. Still, if it's well-written, it can overcome this seeming flaw.

A lot of it is in fact well-written. The tale focuses on a horrendous killing in which a man kills two of three siblings (all under 10) and records it on film. This is not, however, a mystery story, but more of a psychological thriller about how the killings affect two couples who actually have little to do with the crime other than to be in the general area.

The unnamed narrator is a man who travels with his girlfriend, Sonja (who he typically refers to as "my partner") to the Austrian region of West Styria to stay with their friends Heinrich and Eva over the Easter weekend. When the killing takes place, they feel compelled to watch and read about the story. The video of the killing is shown on the news, drawing public protests but lurid interest by the four (especially the men). The fact that the killer is in the area arouses fear, particularly in Eva, but they stick around even as the police converge on the killer.

This is almost a good book, but it is undone at the very end by a plot twist that feels both unnecessary and a bit of a cheat. I won't say what happens, but to me it diminishes all that comes before it. I would imagine, however, that many will actually enjoy the ending even if I didn't. For me, it shows how a good book can be undone in its last two paragraphs, changing a four-or-five star work into a merely passable three.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not a typical thriller Aug. 23 2012
By Z Hayes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product
I picked this up on Vine because I thought it would be like many of the Scandinavian crime thrillers that I am partial to, but this is quite a unique read. I got through it quite fast, after all, it hardly constitutes a novel at just over a 100 pages, and it's more a novella than anything else.

On to the story - the book begins with a statement, and the rest of the story is in this format, detached, and dry. As I read further, I came to understand why this was part of the effect the author was going for, but I'll leave it to other readers to see if they agree with this or not.

Anyway, a young man and his partner Sonja travel to the Austrian countryside to spend a couple of days with their friends Heinrich and Eva. Meanwhile, a horrific event has taken place - two young boys have been killed in a gruesome manner, and a third boy has barely escaped. The perpetrator had recorded the horrific events on tape and this is found and leaked to the public. Everyone is predictably in an uproar. As all of this is unfolding, the two couples go through their relatively mundane activities, and the book follows this series of events until an arrest is made.

Honestly, I did not much care for this style of narration - it left too much unsaid (though I think this is also part of what the author was going for, leaving it to the reader to make assumptions/conclusions), and I did not feel engaged with any of the characters. I much prefer the Scandinavian author Karin Fossum's works. Like the author of this book, Fossum's works provide psychological insights into the minds of the characters, but the difference is that in Fossum's works, there is a balance between deep psychological exploration and the procedural aspects of solving a featured crime (I'd highly recommend The Indian Bride, When The Devil Holds a Candle, and one of the most disturbing of her works, The Water's Edge). When the conclusion arrives, it is a bit of a letdown, and left me underwhelmed. An OK read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Dying on television Sept. 28 2012
By Linda Pagliuco - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product
Very often, translations of novels leave something to be desired. In the case of The Camera Killer, the question is whether or not the translation does justice to the original. The premise of this book is gruesome but provocative. How would people react to seeing actual murders play out in video, a habit pursued by some serial killers. The narrator is a man who is following just this scenario with his female "partner" and another couple, and the plot follows the psychological impact imposed upon them by the 24 hour news coverage on TV. Intriguing idea, but in this book it is either poorly executed or poorly translated, into language that is strangely mechanical in tone. It would be interesting to read a different translation and compare the two, but short of that, it's difficult to form fair judgments about this book's strengths and weaknesses.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Skip the Book, and Go Watch Paint Dry Instead Sept. 16 2012
By Timothy J. Mccarthy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product
An unknown psychopath kidnaps three children in Austria, forces two to jump to their deaths while he videotapes them, and then disappears after the third escapes. Two couples, one staying with the other for Easter weekend, become enthralled with the ensuing manhunt and devote nearly every waking moment to philosophizing about the crime and following the latest developments.

That's a fairly twisted premise for a story, but highly original and possessing tons of potential. But instead of taking us on an adrenaline-fuelled romp through the Austrian woods, the author treats us on a mind-numbing minute-by-minute recounting of every meaningless activity of these four dreary people. It's actually painful wading through this swamp of insignificant verbiage, as we're left mired in a festering morass of mundane minutiae.

Character development is basically nonexistent. We know almost nothing about these people except they plow through mountains of food and guzzle more wine and liquor than all the Bruces at the University of Wallamaloo.

Part of the problem here is the translation, which is unremittingly clunky, filled with awkward phrases and archaic words. The protagonist's girlfriend is constantly referred to as "my partner", rather than just using her name. They don't simply eat, they "masticate". But the main fault lies with the story, where you wait and wait for something interesting to finally happen. But nothing does until the very end, and you can probably see that one coming.

On the plus side, this book is only 108 pages long, so if for some reason you choose to read it, your pain will be short-lived.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Two dead. Film at ten thirty. Sept. 13 2012
By Dick Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product
One thing I noticed immediately is the translator's skill in writing the story in an English style but maintaining the native feel to the speech and descriptions. Of course, I'm assuming this was intentional. If not, it still worked. I dislike translations that try to rewrite the book as if it had been written in English to begin with.

This is more a character study than a mystery. The two couples following the developments in the deaths of two boys are (mainly) together throughout the story. Their lives are caught up due to their location being so close to the site of the crimes.

One main theme was about the appropriateness of a television station showing the video tape of the deaths. The pros and cons of such are cussed and discussed. The four main characters are all of different views - and, true to life - those views change as time passes and the details start to emerge.

As the police look for the suspect, the differences become more pronounced and the tension among them grows. Glavinic uses an interesting low key style of downplaying the intensity and adds in some quite well done "red herrings".

What I find most interesting is the varied group of reviews of "Camera Killer". It almost makes the readers/reviewers part of the book.

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