Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Cats Pajamas Paperback – Mar 1 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.80 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Harvest House Publishers (March 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0736919651
  • ISBN-13: 978-0736919654
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 13.8 x 21.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #642,844 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Lights, Camera, Meow! June 18 2007
By Deborah - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A movie is being filmed in White Sands and Kate, Jake, Jeremy and the cats are all involved! They soon find out that the Hollywood lifestyle isn't all that it's cracked up to be. When the acting double of an old flame of Jake's turns up dead, everyone's a suspect. From the nasty producer that everyone hates to the costar to wants a bigger role to even Jake himself, the small town becomes shaken by the murder. But when a second killing happens just days later, the only ones who can solve the case have four paws and a tail. It's up to Jacques and Cleo to come to the rescue again!

I thought that this book was lots better than the first book in the series. The cats get more talking time and a bigger role in this book. They even get to star in the movie! I liked how Jacques and Cleo have more conversations and more opinions on their owners. I think that they are smarter than Kate and Jake in regards to their relationship. There are more new characters introduced in this book. Because of the movie being filmed in the town, many Hollywood type folks enter the scene. Avis, the lead actress, and Jake have a past but their relationship felt very fake. I felt that the remarks by the producer, Aaron Tobin, were quite harsh especially the racist comments he made. He definitely comes off as a character everyone loves to hate. Jake still comes off as a very unlikable character to me. Even though there are several scenes where he helps out those around him (ie taking care of Ocie) he still acts like a jerk. Two scenes that come to mind are when he gets mad at Kate for going out with Bev and tells her he would give her a whipping if she was his daughter. This comes off very chauvinistic because he's acting jealous for no reason and plus Kate had done absolutely nothing wrong. The other scene is when he throws Jacques, who has very dangerous claws, at an actor simply because Jake doesn't like his choice of career. Eric ends up getting hurt but Jake never apologizes which I felt was really distasteful of his actions since Kate had warned him that Jacques could do serious damage.

The mystery once again is a good one. I did guess the ending this time but overall I enjoyed the whole story. I always enjoy reading books about what it is like to make a movie. Overall I enjoyed this book and am looking forward to reading this book. I just hope that Jake's character will change in the third book, as it stands I'm still not a fan of him.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Another fun CAT mystery March 3 2007
By Armchair Interviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Those rascally cats Jacque the Ripper, and Cleo are at it again. Along with their person Kate, her son Jeremy and the Intruder, better known as Jake Novak, they are all off on another mystery. Living in their inherited home on the beach with all the other animals, they are soon swept into another episode of two murders and a stabbing.

This time it involves a movie-making crew and Hollywood stars that have come to the beach at White Sands, Alabama. Kate and Jake have been invited to a party at the home where the movie crew is staying. The reason is to discuss the use of the two cats, Jacque and Cleo in the movie. The producer Aaron, and the director Jesse, are father and son, and are very different in temperament. The father is a bully and the son a meek-appearing young man. The people in the crew that accompanies them have various reasons to hate Aaron. Even the actors and actresses hold resentments toward him. Jake soon learns that an old flame from his past is the star of the movie.

When the first murder occurs, Jake is pulled in for questioning, as he was the last person to see the victim alive. After Jake is able to show his innocence, he is asked to help the local sheriff to help with the investigation. He puts aside the novel he is writing to help. Another murder and a stabbing happen, and no one is able to solve this mystery, until Jacque the Ripper finds a major clue.

This is second in a series and is a fun read. It involves twists and turns making you think you know "who done it," and then finding out you were totally wrong. So when is the next adventure for this menagerie?

Armchair Interviews says: As much fun as What the Cat Dragged Inwas, with these two cat characters.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Cat's Pajamas April 29 2008
By Catherine M. Wolf - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Since I started reading cat mysteries about three years ago Mr. Morris's series was a delighful surprise. I started with Liian Jackson Braun (The Cat Who...I loved them), followed by Rita Mae Brown series (Mrs. Murphy and The Hunt series)(which I loved) followed by the Joe Cat Mysteries and then I discovered I had read all of the books published by these three authors. Gilbert Morris's series is fun, light, and a very good read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The Cat's Pajamas ~ Reviewed Oct. 1 2007
By Novel Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In the second book of Morris's cat detectives series, the mystery is more developed and more vital to the story. A movie is being filmed in White Sands, and to everyone's astonishment, it seems that Jake once had a romantic relationship with its famous leading lady. The cats are involved, too, when they're chosen to be in the film. Throw in an obnoxious, bullying producer, his beaten-down son, a jealous actress, and you know trouble is coming. Morris throws a slight curve ball, however. Since pretty much everyone is given a motive for killing the evil producer Aaron Tobin, you're just waiting for him to become a victim. Instead, someone entirely unexpected is killed. And of course, Jacques comes to the rescue once again.

The other characters in White Sands are more developed in the second book, as well, including the beautiful veterinarian, Enola, who comes around regularly to check on the animals. Morgan Brice and his daughter, Rhiannon, who appeared briefly in book one, play a larger role this time around. Brice is an elderly eccentric who lives in a shack on the beach and home schools his granddaughter. Rhiannon is a ten-year-old genius who has practically memorized their set of encyclopedias, spouts large words and philosophy, and says whatever is on her mind--no matter how tactless.

If you plan to spend some time this summer lying on the beach, or by the pool, throw a copy of Morris's cat detective books into your beach bag.

Reviewed by Robin Johns Grant
[...]
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Different than expected -- Lots of evangelism June 10 2009
By Tigger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have never read this author before. The plot has been well-summarized by other reviewers, so I won't get into those details. I was NOT expecting the extensive use of Evangelical Christianity throughout the book (and in the 1st and 3rd books in the series); in fact, I found it very heavy-handed. The books came across as blatant evangelism hiding (not very well) behind an animal mystery facade. The mystery parts are OK, but I don't think I'll be reading any more from this author. Being a somewhat lapsed mainstream Protestant who doesn't regularly attend church, I found that I can't stand the preachy characters, and the characters who start out skeptical about religion (often "bad guys" who are just about to "see the light") invariably "get Jesus" by the end of the book. I think the stories would be more appealing to the general population without religious references. If you're not uncomfortable with all the religious references, the books are relatively well written and are "clean" without being unbearably Victorian.


Feedback