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  • The Celebration [Import]
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The Celebration [Import]


Price: CDN$ 125.10
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Frequently Bought Together

The Celebration [Import] + After The Wedding + The Hunt / La Chasse (Bilingual)
Price For All Three: CDN$ 169.04

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Product Details

  • Actors: Ulrich Thomsen, Henning Moritzen, Thomas Bo Larsen, Paprika Steen, Birthe Neumann
  • Directors: Thomas Vinterberg
  • Writers: Thomas Vinterberg, Mogens Rukov
  • Producers: Birgitte Hald, Morten Kaufmann
  • Format: Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, NTSC, Import
  • Language: Danish
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Universal Studios
  • Release Date: July 27 2004
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00023P4N8

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven Y. on July 4 2004
Format: DVD
Thomas Vinterberg's "The Celebration" examines what happens when the unease typically in the air at a family gathering transforms into horror upon the revelation of a dark family secret to everyone in attendance. Yet, the most noteworthy aspect of this film is not so much its story but the manner in which that story is told. "The Celebration" is a fascinating venture that is equal parts a straight drama and a surreal experimental work.
Helge (Henning Moritzen) is celebrating his 60th birthday at his family inn at Denmark. His three children, Christian (Ulrich Thomsen), Michael (Thomas Bo Larsen), and Helene (Paprika Steen) return home for the party but their joy is tempered by a recent suicide in the family. At the birthday celebration, Christian stands before the assembled guests and exclaims that his father is not the upstanding man that many believe him to be. In fact, Christian accuses his father of horrible acts committed upon his children when they were younger. The evening further spirals out of control when Helene's boyfriend becomes the target of the family's bigotry and a servant reveals an affair she had with a family member. By the next morning, the dynamics of Helge's family have irrevocably changed.
"The Celebration" is one of the products of the "Dogma 95" document in which a group of Danish directors pledged to shoot films using only hand-held cameras and the natural sounds and props found on location. These films were not to include any special effects or musical scores. This minimalist approach to filmmaking proves fascinating as it allows the true essence of the creative process to filter through in the end product. Vinterberg had nothing at his disposal to enhance or salvage his film if what he had on film proved lacking.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LGwriter on May 21 2004
Format: DVD
Thomas Vinterberg's Celebration is without question one of the best of the Danish Dogme (spelled this way in Denmark, not Dogma) 95 films.
As the film opens, we see various people, in groups of two, three, and more, converge on a large house--walking, driving, and bicycling. They are gathering to celebrate the 60th birthday of the man who fathered four children--they who have now come to pay their respects with their wives, husbands, boyfriends and girlfriends. The man has made a tidy sum thanks to his unnamed business, and he and his wife live quite comfortably. Also invited are the older couple's friends, and by the time everyone has arrived, there is a full house indeed, all seated at the host's large dinner table.
Speeches are made, glasses are chinked together in toasts, food is eaten. The daughter has a black American boyfriend and it's a wicked foreshadowing that has him insulted by one of his girlfriend's brothers--an out and out racist remark.
This sets the stage for a shocking turn of events when one of the man's sons stands and proposes a toast to his father that leaves the guests completely stunned. A dark secret is revealed that is so out of place with the reason for the "celebration", nothing can ever be the same following the younger man's toast.
The drama here is powerful, intense, seething. One of the trademark strengths of Dogme 95 cinema, as many of us know by now, is its focus on story alone, without reliance on any special effects--CGI, lighting, or otherwise--and Vinterberg has here wisely chosen a story so strong that to "enhance" it with anything remotely resembling special effects would be doing it a major disservice--would be, in fact, blatantly stupid.
This is one of the best Danish films of the 20th century and should absolutely not be missed.
Very highly recommended.
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Thomas Vinterberg's "The Celebration" examines what happens when the unease typically in the air at a family gathering transforms into horror upon the revelation of a dark family secret to everyone in attendance. Yet, the most noteworthy aspect of this film is not so much its story but the manner in which that story is told. "The Celebration" is a fascinating venture that is equal parts a straight drama and a surreal experimental work.
Helge (Henning Moritzen) is celebrating his 60th birthday at his family inn at Denmark. His three children, Christian (Ulrich Thomsen), Michael (Thomas Bo Larsen), and Helene (Paprika Steen) return home for the party but their joy is tempered by a recent suicide in the family. At the birthday celebration, Christian stands before the assembled guests and exclaims that his father is not the upstanding man that many believe him to be. In fact, Christian accuses his father of horrible acts committed upon his children when they were younger. The evening further spirals out of control when Helene's boyfriend becomes the target of the family's bigotry and a servant reveals an affair she had with a family member. By the next morning, the dynamics of Helge's family have irrevocably changed.
"The Celebration" is one of the products of the "Dogma 95" document in which a group of Danish directors pledged to shoot films using only hand-held cameras and the natural sounds and props found on location. These films were not to include any special effects or musical scores. This minimalist approach to filmmaking proves fascinating as it allows the true essence of the creative process to filter through in the end product. Vinterberg had nothing at his disposal to enhance or salvage his film if what he had on film proved lacking.
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