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The Chestnut King: Book 3 of the 100 Cupboards [Hardcover]

N. D. Wilson
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Jan. 26 2010 The 100 Cupboards (Book 3)
When Henry York found 99 cupboards hidden behind his bedroom wall, he never dreamed they were doors to entirely new worlds! Unfortunately, Henry’s discovery freed an ancient, undying witch, whose hunger for power would destroy every world connected to the cupboards—and every person whom Henry loves. Henry must seek out the legendary Chestnut King for help. Everything has a price, however, and the Chestnut King’s desire may be as dangerous as the witch herself.

N. D. Wilson concludes a remarkable, worlds-spanning journey that began with one boy and one hundred avenues to adventure.

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Product Description

Review

Kirkus Reviews, December 15, 2009:
"an entirely satisfying finish."

About the Author

N. D. Wilson is the bestselling author of the Ashtown Burials series and Leepike Ridge. When he was a kid, he spent nearly a year living in his grandparents’ attic. If there were cupboards in those walls, he never found them. He and his wife live in Idaho, along with their five young explorers.

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A great conclusion to a fantastic series Sept. 2 2011
By D Glover TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
N.D. Wilson has concluded his great trilogy in fantastic form. This was the best written of the three books but saying that does not mean the series was unbalanced. Henry York Maccabee's adventures lead him on a inter-world chase with the witch-queen of Endor, sometimes pursuing, sometimes being pursued. There is the classic final confrontation of good and evil in a climactic battle and duel but this one has much to make it fresh and it doesn't seem stock.

In an era of broken families (both in the real world and the literary one), one of the most refreshing aspects of this series is how central family is to the story. It might be said that, if good vs. evil is the central conflict, family is the pervading context within which the characters on both sides play out the drama. Henry's immediate and extended (and growing) family pulls together more and more throughout, each working for the same end and each using the gifts, abilities and resources they have toward this same end. No one of them could defeat the witch and her minions alone, but together they are a united force for good. The witch's false family (her evil captains, the fingerlings, call her 'blood mother' and refer to each other as 'blood brothers'), united by the witch's manipulation and lust for dominion, is a shadow and abortion of a true family. In a powerful conclusion to a running inner struggle with the evil chief fingerling, the power of true family wins out over the brute force and lies of the false. In an age of young people's literature, where families are shrinking and breaking apart, it was a genuine breath of fresh air to not only see a family stick together but to see it growing (in strength and number).
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4.0 out of 5 stars The End of Cupboard Travel March 8 2011
By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Reason for Reading: Next (and last) in the trilogy.

It's the final showdown in this volume. Nimiane is making her move to take over the empire, her hatred for Henry's bloodline makes his whole family targets of her wrath, especially him, since they are tied together with the blood bond and she knows how powerful he could become. Most of the book takes place within the worlds of the cupboards, with the doors being used for travel and a few pit stops are made here and there to the house in Kansas in the process. People actually notice a few strange things happening where the house used to be and the area is becoming popular to the paranormal events -type crowd. Henry learns a lot more about who he is and who he could be while Henrietta becomes much more of a teammate than she has ever been before, though she and Henry do end up on different teams at times. I think all the characters have grown as people throughout this series and that is always a good feeling to have at the end of a series.

The paranormal elements of this volume where quite intriguing. The full truth comes out about Henry's scar and his ties to Endor because of it. Henry's case is an exciting one as at one point it boils down to the options of giving up and dying quickly or going forward to die with honour or at least die trying. But things are never always as they seem and at the end we can sigh with relief at the happy ending. In fact, this is my main problem with the book, the ending is too pat. All ends were finished off just so perfectly nicely that it destroyed some of the story's believability for me.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Chestnut King July 22 2010
Format:Hardcover
Wonderful fantasy story that even surpasses its predecessors!

This is a series of rare quality and deserves a large readership. This the third book of the imaginative '100 Cupboards' series carries on with the adventures of Henry Maccabee who is fast approaching the onset of the teenage years. Henry is not just an ordinary boy from the Boston area but actually came to Earth via one of the 100 magic doors which are hidden in a wall. Of course you always need a foe for your hero to deal with and Henry's comes in the form of a witch as Henry's family face danger. Henry faces the task of tracking down and getting help from 'The Chestnut King' in order to save the day.

A class act, other really excellent fantasies are:

Godstone - The Kairos Boxes

The Roman Mysteries Omnibus
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book and series May 22 2010
By Steven R. McEvoy HALL OF FAME TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
I will start off by saying that I absolutely love this series. When I read book one, 100 Cupboards, I thought it was an excellent story and that it could be the beginning of a great series. When I read book 2, Dandelion Fire, I thought it was an incredible story, Tolkienesk even, and yet it left we wanting more of Henry's story. Book 3, The Chestnut King, blew away all my previous expectations. Very few authors in my opinion are worthy of being compared to C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien or Madeleine L'Engle, and yet as I read this book I could not help but find myself comparing the author's style, and the substance of his writings to these three giants in literature.

This story continues the adventures of Henry York Maccabee, a young boy about to turn 13, raised near Boston on our earth. While visiting family in Kansas he discovers 100 magic doors hidden in a wall. He also finds out that he is not from earth and that the person he thought was his Grandfather had brought him through one of the doors when he was young. He has released an ancient evil Nimiane from Endor, and she devours all life. She is hunting Henry and wants to capture him before he comes into his power. He has been touched by her blood and its scar on his face is expanding. It is a bond between them. Henry's Father and Uncle are off searching for the dark witch when calamity befalls the family. They are taken by soldiers from a southern kingdom. The dark witch is trying to draw Mordecai, Henry's father, and Henry into a trap.

This specific story, and the whole trilogy, is told as a series of narratives telling different people's parts of the story. It reminds me of The Lord of The Rings Trilogy, which is told in 6 books each telling a part of the tale and going back and forth. This story does the same thing.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  56 reviews
28 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius Feb. 6 2010
By Amanda K. Patchin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I've been reading N.D. Wilson's writing, ever since he first started getting it published. I read his early short stories and poems in Credenda Agenda. I've also recommended his work before but having just finished the concluding volume of his 100 Cupboards trilogy (100 Cupboards, Dandelion Fire, The Chestnut King), I have much more to say.

Genius is rare. We all know that. Acheiving popularity as a writer is pretty rare too. Very rarely do the two coincide, and it is almost unheard of for genius and popularity to come together in the author's own lifetime. I sincerely hope it happens for N.D. Wilson though. He's got five kids to feed.

There is quite a lot going on in this trilogy and I really don't have the time or the space to analyze everything. I do want to make a couple of comparisons though. I'm not a fan of Rowling, or her hero: Harry Potter. I don't hate the kid, but I find his story dull and uninteresting. I don't find the world Rowling created very magical, mysterious, or enchanting. I wouldn't really want to visit there. The school politics and bereaucracy are alive and well in that world and their mind-numbing qualities are quite available outside the pages of a book. The idea that she is writing about wizardry is severely misguided. What she calls wizardry and magic, is really just scientific knowledge and method. The classes at Hogwarts are just science and history classes. The wizard world is only a more technologically advanced version of Great Britain.

All of that to say, Wilson's fantasy world is as homegrown American as Rowling's is British, but it is truly fantastical. There exists within it references to things like mayors and bereaucracies, but the vision of it is transformative and deeply magical. Wilson's hero-child, Henry, isn't a wizard (though wizards do exist and are wizardish), he is a green-man. This distinction is important imaginatively and it deeply shapes the narrative. Harry Potter is basically a bright-boy with a high IQ. This means his spells work particularly well. He still has to memorize them though. He has to have technical knowledge to be a wizard. Wilson's wizards have mysterious knowledge but they operate in a Merlinic fashion: they produce their effects by being themselves rather than by manipulating charms. Henry is a seventh son of a seventh son, branded by the fire of the dandelion. Further, Henry's powers and knowledge as a green-man are acheived as wisdom is, by distilled experience and personal virtue. Birth and naming are more important than access to textbooks or library research (sorry Hermione). This means that the pull, the attraction, of Wilson's world is that of the mythic, the poetic, the otherworldly. Rowling's world is attractive as all success, fame, and ambition stories are; they stimulate the desires of pride and lust for power.

Another interesting aspect of the 100 Cupboards series is the orphan-status of the hero: Henry. Many (most?) children's books feature an orphan for the hero. I have a very smart colleague at Boise State who is studying this phenomena in mythology and literature. Sometimes the child is an outright orphan, as is Harry Potter, and sometimes it is a child with orphan-status: some kind of parents exist but he is effectively abandoned and alone. Wilson takes this typical situation and uses it in some unique ways. I've never seen the joy and the primacy of a family so beautifully affirmed in a book. It is a wonderful to read. Wilson is Gene Wolfe for kids.

Finally, one character when faced with death, comments that he ought to have eaten more of his wife's pies. And that is just good philosophy.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The End of Cupboard Travel March 8 2011
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Reason for Reading: Next (and last) in the trilogy.

It's the final showdown in this volume. Nimiane is making her move to take over the empire, her hatred for Henry's bloodline makes his whole family targets of her wrath, especially him, since they are tied together with the blood bond and she knows how powerful he could become. Most of the book takes place within the worlds of the cupboards, with the doors being used for travel and a few pit stops are made here and there to the house in Kansas in the process. People actually notice a few strange things happening where the house used to be and the area is becoming popular to the paranormal events -type crowd. Henry learns a lot more about who he is and who he could be while Henrietta becomes much more of a teammate than she has ever been before, though she and Henry do end up on different teams at times. I think all the characters have grown as people throughout this series and that is always a good feeling to have at the end of a series.

The paranormal elements of this volume where quite intriguing. The full truth comes out about Henry's scar and his ties to Endor because of it. Henry's case is an exciting one as at one point it boils down to the options of giving up and dying quickly or going forward to die with honour or at least die trying. But things are never always as they seem and at the end we can sigh with relief at the happy ending. In fact, this is my main problem with the book, the ending is too pat. All ends were finished off just so perfectly nicely that it destroyed some of the story's believability for me. The other thing I find annoying is the trend of these juvenile fantasies, with book 1 being 200 and some pages, book two pushes the 400 mark and then book 3 has to top them all off by trying to become a 500 page tome. That is what actually made me take so long to get started on this book since I had enjoyed the first two books so much.

An interesting, well-thought out fantasy world and story that delivers an exciting conclusion while on the other hand draws out the trilogy when it might have been trimmed a little to make it a bit move quicker and therefore more tense.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book and series May 22 2010
By Steven R. McEvoy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I will start off by saying that I absolutely love this series. When I read book one, 100 Cupboards, I thought it was an excellent story and that it could be the beginning of a great series. When I read book 2, Dandelion Fire, I thought it was an incredible story, Tolkienesk even, and yet it left we wanting more of Henry's story. Book 3, The Chestnut King, blew away all my previous expectations. Very few authors in my opinion are worthy of being compared to C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien or Madeleine L'Engle, and yet as I read this book I could not help but find myself comparing the author's style, and the substance of his writings to these three giants in literature.

This story continues the adventures of Henry York Maccabee, a young boy about to turn 13, raised near Boston on our earth. While visiting family in Kansas he discovers 100 magic doors hidden in a wall. He also finds out that he is not from earth and that the person he thought was his Grandfather had brought him through one of the doors when he was young. He has released an ancient evil Nimiane from Endor, and she devours all life. She is hunting Henry and wants to capture him before he comes into his power. He has been touched by her blood and its scar on his face is expanding. It is a bond between them. Henry's Father and Uncle are off searching for the dark witch when calamity befalls the family. They are taken by soldiers from a southern kingdom. The dark witch is trying to draw Mordecai, Henry's father, and Henry into a trap.

This specific story, and the whole trilogy, is told as a series of narratives telling different people's parts of the story. It reminds me of The Lord of The Rings Trilogy, which is told in 6 books each telling a part of the tale and going back and forth. This story does the same thing. Told from Henry's vantage point, his cousin Henrietta's, his father's and at times even the witch's, the story switches back and forth from different vantage points and most times there are gaps in the story. Some get filled in by others, some are left for you to fill in. Yet it works together as a cohesive whole. At nearly 500 pages this third volume is the longest and also the best written. The story is compelling and highly addictive. I read it in 3 sittings, not wanting to put it down either of the times I did, but life intruded upon my desired reading time.

This is an excellent book by an author who is coming into his own. The story arc across the three novels proceeds well, and this particular volume is excellent. I look forward to future offerings from N.D. Wilson for if they are as good as this one, they will be greatly entertaining.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Style and suspense! Oct. 25 2013
By Ashley Elizabeth Blair Tetzlaff - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Grand style, heart-jumping-into-your-throat action, amazing ending.

This book is a lot darker than the other ones, as the story plot moves more and more from Narnian to Lord of the Rings-ish. A evil darkness hides, 10 "fingerlings" (think, ringwraiths) track Henry by smelling and sensing him (not by a ring, but by a scar from the evil queen), everyone is running, running, running... all is about lost when Henry finds the strength in and outside of him to kill the witch. As much as I enjoyed the story, I missed having an Aslan figure, a God, that one could depend on to come through in times of crisis, instead of just digging deeper into oneself or nature.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars loved it Oct. 2 2011
By Tara - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
My family loved this book. Positive truths to help my kids think about living a life of character in a book they love reading.
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