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The Children of Men Paperback – Jul 26 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Canada (July 26 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0676977693
  • ISBN-13: 978-0676977691
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.4 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #54,402 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

In her 12th book, the British author of the two series featuring Adam Dalgleish and Cordelia Gray ( Devices and Desires and An Unsuitable Job for a Woman , respectively) poses a premise that chills and darkens its setting in the year 2021. Near the end of the 20th century, for reasons beyond the grasp of modern science, human sperm count went to zero. The last birth occurred in 1995, and in the space of a generation humanity has lost its future. In England, under the rule of an increasingly despotic Warden, the infirm are encouraged to commit group suicide, criminals are exiled and abandoned and immigrants are subjected to semi-legalized slavery. Divorced, middle-aged Oxford history professor Theo Faron, an emotionally constrained man of means and intelligence who is the Warden's cousin, plods through an ordered, bleak existence. But a chance involvement with a group of dissidents moves him onto unexpected paths, leading him, in the novel's compelling second half, toward risk, commitment and the joys and anguish of love. In this convincingly detailed world--where kittens are (illegally) christened, sex has lost its allure and the arts have been abandoned--James concretely explores an unthinkable prospect. Readers should persevere through the slow start, for the rewards of this story, including its reminder of the transforming power of hope, are many and lasting. 125,000 first printing; BOMC main selection.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

“Extraordinary … daring … frightening in its implications.”
The New York Times

“She writes like an angel. Every character is closely drawn. Her atmosphere is unerringly, chillingly convincing. And she manages all this without for a moment slowing down the drive and tension of an exciting mystery.”
The Times (UK)

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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker on April 23 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a great book. P. D. James has clearly displayed that she can suceed at anything she turns her hand to. i even found myself enjoying this novel even more than some of the Dalgliesh books.
There is one word that can describe this book. That word is............Lovely...........mainly because it is. The plot is, perhaps somewhat simple, but that just makes for an easier read. and it does start fairly slowly. But it is lovely. Aside from being a futuristic novel, it is also a very tender lovestory. One of the things that make this book great is the fact that it is a nice old fashioned story. Some of the ideas Ms James had are now, clearly not correct, but could well have been. everything she has written is the product of a very logical mind and, if things had gone differently, none of them are beyond the bounds of our imaginations. Some of the things she writes even seem comical compared to now. Which, whilst probably not intentional, does add flavour to the story. There is also good, adventure, intirgue, action, etc.
Well done, I would reccomend this to one and all as proof of Ms James title as one of the best writer's the world has ever seen. I shall savour every one of her novels, because i only expect there to be two, possibly three, more, because, let's face it people, she won't be around for ever, enjoy her while you can!!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K.P. on April 26 2008
Format: Paperback
I liked the movie, but the book is MUCH better and not for the usual reasons . I found the story in the book to be much richer, there were just much more "stuff" in it. The book spent much more time on the description of the Omegan's which is central to the story, and the ending was MUCH better.
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By Brent Wiley on July 15 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of those books that makes you think. The first two chapters took me forever to read because after each paragraph, I'd set the book down and just contemplate the premise of this book: what if, suddenly, no more babies were born? Definitely worth reading.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. McMaster on July 27 2007
Format: Paperback
I read this book because I read a review that said the movie had missed the point of the book. Not only did it miss the point, it missed the entire story. Aside from the general setting and the catalyst event, it's a completely different. Some of the characters have the same names but often have very different roles or personalities. Though, I don't think the story of the book as is would have made a great movie; there is a lot of philosophical introspection and a lot less action, it makes for a good read. My one criticism would be PD James' lack of research into the generation of her character. The book is written in 1992. The book is set in 2021 and her main character is 50 years old. But it feels as though she has taken someone who is 50 in 1992 and cast them into the future. This especially apparent when the main character recounts his childhood. I'm only seven years younger than him, yet I didn't identify at all. The childhood almost seems like something out of the 50s. In the respect of transposing generations into the future, the movie is far more successful. To be fair, the screen writer did have an extra 15 years of history to work with.
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