The Chinese in America: A Narrative History and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 16.61
  • List Price: CDN$ 23.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 6.39 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 3 to 6 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Chinese in America: A Narrative History Paperback – Mar 29 2004


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 16.61
CDN$ 11.44 CDN$ 0.01
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (March 29 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142004170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142004173
  • Product Dimensions: 20.4 x 13.6 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #57,716 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Chang has told a very important history chapter on the overseas Chinese, whose life and history are little known to the world. I was really moved by it. It shows the difficult path for the Chinese to truly embrace the world. Furthermore, China back home is even moving faster in integrating its life with the world. That is great. Despite all the difficulties, things are really openning up for the better. A sweeping story is given on this by another brilliant Chinese journalist George Zhibin Gu in his book: China's global reach: markets, multinationals, and globalization, which offers vast insights on current China and global affairs.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on June 4 2004
Format: Paperback
Iris Chang deserves credit for targeting such a broad subject and I found new information frequently during my reading. The prose, however, was average without much elegance. I agree with other readers that Evil White People populate this book more than is fair. The definitive account of this important topic waits to be written.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
Before I start commenting on this book, let me mention my own background: I came to America from Hong Kong when I was 18, and only recently became a naturalized American citizen. I have lived in America for 15 years.
I came across The Chinese In America first because a white friend who adopted a Chinese girl recommended the book to me. Since I have little interest in history, I was reluctant to read it at first; but a few pages later I was engrossed by the book. In history classes in college I learned a little bit about the Chinese building rail roads and the Exclusion Act, but not much more. This book gave much more detail and is so well written that I had no trouble reading it to the end. I am sure my being Chinese helped spark the interest in a subject I normally don't care about. When I was done, I was so impressed with the book that I ordered a copy from amazon.com so that my kids can read it when they grow up.
I think most of the book is accurate, but there are some errors. For example, the book mentioned the Imperial Examination in China as being initiated by the Ching (Manchurian) emperors. I am quite certain that's not true. That Exam's been around for thousands of years, as a lot of ancient literature mention it, such as the famed Journey to the West, whose background was set back in the Tang Dynasty. Ms. Chang's point was that the Manchurians used the Imperial Exams to control the Chinese people, and her attitude towards them is clearly hostile. But the Manchurians are also considered Chinese these days, so it seems ludicrous that a historian should be incensed about a 400 year old injury.
Throughout the book, Ms.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Jin Daikoku on May 7 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book portrays a skewed and somewhat racist view of history. I.E. it focusses on the "white" vs. "chinese". Moreover, at the time of this writing, all of the good reviews come from Chinese people. Take that as a clue.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Jan. 5 2004
Format: Hardcover
The initial portion of the book is a lucid and well organized account of Chinese-American history. The latter half of the book, falters into a jargonistic series of feature stories, which are interesting anecdote, but fail to make any real point. While Ms. Chang is specific in referring to Chinese immigrants by time and place (e.g. "ABC" American born chinese), she uses gross and undefined terms for everyone else (e.g. "Caucasians", "whites" "white culture"). The term "Caucasian" is as meaningless and offensive as the terms "Oriental" Ms. Chang fails to mention that the same opprobrium reserved for the Chinese, was also brought to bear on the Irish and other "white" groups. It is too simplistic to look at "whites" v. "Chinese" as a paradigm for a study of ethnic assimilation. As a journalist, lacking historical acumen or training, Ms. Chang ultimately has little to add.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
Unlike her groundbreaking "Rape of Nanking", in which the combination of explosive new material on a covert history and Iris Chang's biting investigative/pursuit tone worked effectively, this book covers familiar Chinese-American history broadly and in great quantity, but presents little startling new revelations (although some of the original interviews are fresh). Some important historical details are glossed over (and wrong in a few cases). At times, her observations are quite biased. As a longtime student of Chinese and Chinese-American history, I was somewhat disappointed that Chang did not "blow the covers off". Nevertheless, the book does serve as a good overview of the Chinese-American experience. Chang's contribution here is that she allows readers to see it from the viewpoint of a Chinese-American, and understand that the racism, struggle and bitter triumph of this experience is still ongoing. That is the theme that she does a good job underscoring with her choice of focus. The tone of her writing is "essay-like", not professorial or objective.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By KY Lee on Aug. 14 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a 25 year old Canadian Born Chinese I am very greatful for Iris's book. It provided me with huge insights to the movements of the Chinese and why they are the way they are.
I highly reccomend this book to other ABC's and CBC's so they know and can be proud of the people that "layed the tracks" so we could have a better future in North America.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback