The Chronoliths and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Chronoliths Hardcover – Aug 11 2001


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 25.00 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 301 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (Aug. 11 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312873840
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312873844
  • Product Dimensions: 22.4 x 17.8 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #772,856 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
It was Hitch Paley, rolling his beat-up Daimler motorbike across the packed sand of the beach behind the Haat Thai Dance Pavilion, who invited me to witness the end of an age. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
..., I mean: please - The Chronoliths? The vague, futurey/fantasy-inspired cover art?

Despite appearances, however, this is a mature, heartbreaking, but ultimately optimistic novel about believable, flawed characters.

Highly recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I’ve been working hard to read a lot of the ARC’s I received at Book Expo America and have read and reviewed three. But on a recent trip, I finished one and had only my trusty backup emergency paperback in my bag. It was The Chronoliths by Robert Charles Wilson, recommended to me by my friend Christopher (who also turned me on to Illium).

Christopher is 2 for 2; I could not put this book down. And he made me use the Internet to connect the dots of my long ago Physics degree and go back and refresh my old brain on manifolds and their relationship to quantum mechanics (yeah, I know…geek boy).

The Chronoliths tells of massive monuments that spring up instantaneously, the first one in Thailand, observed by our main character Scott. All of them have inscriptions of a battle won some twenty years in the future by a warlord named Kuin. Another springs up in the middle of Bangkok, causing devastation. The monuments are named Chronoliths, and begin showing up all over Asia, apparently foretelling the path of conquest of this future warlord.

The science is, of course, how can these monoliths be sent twenty years back in time, and how to stop them. Because as they appear with alarming regularity, mankind begins to believe that there is no way to stop them and society sees itself as doomed. A former college professor of Scott’s, Sue Chopra, believes she can first predict and then stop the Chronolith’s from forming, with some string theory / M-theory constructs:

I did not then and I do not now understand the physics of the Chronoliths, except in the pop-science sense.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By B. Salomons on Feb. 6 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I picked up one of his earlier works -- I want to say 'by accident', but it's tough to 'accidentally read a novel' -- by chance a half-decade ago, and it was one of those few books that I sat down and read right through in a short span of time (I'm a slow but careful reader.) Usually I take my time, get distracted, and it takes months to read a book from start to finish when all the little breaks get factored in. But there is something about the style that is not especially complex, but brings together a absolutely solid concept into a flowing narrative. But, I don't think it's that Wilson has so much a 'great' writing style, but rather that his ideas are just plain unique: think philosophical or scientific paradox set in the near future, with fairly solid three-dimensional character development.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I found this book superior to Darwinia which Wilson wrote first. If he continues to top his previous efforts like this, I look forward to reading his next work.
The basic story follows an initially irresponsible expatriate in Thailand who witnesses the arrival of the first "Chronolith" which has been sent back in time by an unknown conqueror. They continue to appear with dates of victories in the near future.
As everyone scrambles to learn the secret behind them, the expatriate turns out to be something of a catalyst for the story and even a hero of sorts.
The concept is unique and suspenseful with some attempts to explain the phenomonon that don't bog the story down in technicalese. Best of all Wilson pulls the whole thing off in a reasonable length unlike some of the bloated and under edited books inflicted on us lately by "name" authors like David Hamilton.
If you are looking for a taut thriller with some humour and even family drama plus a great Science Fiction concept and a twist ending; pick this up. It is a greaat summer read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By themarsman on June 17 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Wilson's Chronliths, Scott Warden tells of how the Chronoliths -- giant monuments sent back in time about 20 years by some entity known as Kuin -- have effected his life via his memoirs (this book). Scott was on the scene soon after the arrival of the first Chronolith in Thailand. Because of this, Sue Chopra -- a brilliant physicist -- takes an interest in him. Sue is determined to figure out how Kuin is sending the Chronoliths back in time...and ultimately how to destroy them.
This is the second book I've read by Wilson and this is the second time I have felt like the characterizations Wilson puts together are quite decent, but that the story itself is lacking...though Wilson's ideas on the social upheaval brought on by the arrival of the monuments are worthy of note...I just wish he had gone farther with it. In both the Chronoliths and the other Wilson book I've read, Mysterium, Wilson skips around in time quite a bit. Maybe it is because of this that his plots seem to suffer. The overall concept of the Chronoliths was an interesting one and the general way in which Wilson handles it isn't bad -- via Scott's memoirs -- I just wish he had put a bit more time into drawing the plot better.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback