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The Color of Loss: An Intimate Portrait of New Orleans after Katrina Hardcover – Mar 1 2008


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"The wonder of these photographs is that they look like paintings, yet the objects depicted within them are not idealized. The dying domestic objects of the people to whom these interiors belong are no longer of this world. They have been captured on their journey to becoming indistinct trash. At the moment of their capture, they still looked like what they used to be, but moments after they were photographed, they no longer were anything. Their last breath of life is in these photographs; their only other existence is in the memories of their owners." Andrei Codrescu

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Amazon.com: 7 reviews
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Poignant Heartache April 7 2008
By Literary Man - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A beautiful and compelling portraiture of sorrow and loss, and the ravages of time frozen, captured in a memory.
Surreal Look at New Orleans after Katrina July 7 2010
By Cindy W. Bonner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Mold. And also dried mud. Lots of both figure into this photo collection by Dan Burkholder. Using an innovative digital technology called high dynamic range (HDR) imaging, he creates surreal painting-like photos that document New Orleans after Katrina, after the flood waters receded, and from an interior point-of-view.

In his Introduction, Burkholder says he was teaching photography in Montana when the hurricane struck. Like everyone else in the country, he watched the television images of the destruction but noticed that all the focus was on the outside world: cars in trees, the breached levees, houses smashed into other houses. Hardly anything he saw showed what the interiors of those houses looked like, or how individual lives had been intimately affected. What about the books? the baby pictures? clothes? family heirlooms? the accouterment of ordinary, everyday life? How had all of those things weathered the storm?

Burkholder took his camera and made a pilgrimage to New Orleans several weeks after the storm and the floods had done their damage. What he found was overwhelming. The way he chose to photograph it, using the high dynamic digital technique, produced remarkably sharp, oddly beautiful images that reach out with intense emotional impact.

The first thing you notice is the mold at work. Not just on the walls, but in unexpected places: on the mini blinds in a sewing room; on children's artwork in a kindergarten glass; on the stained glass windows of a church; on the towels and toilet seat in a invalid's bathroom. Dried mud, like cracked plates, covers floors. Peeling wallpaper give a ghoulishness to a pink living room. Sloughing paint transforms a laundry room into a haunted house.

What makes these photographs special is the HDR method. It is a way of capturing scenes with extremely high contrast ratios between light and dark. The effect is that details defused in traditional photographs, because of a glaring light through a window for instance, are made specific and clear. Instead of monochromatic mold on mold or mud on mud, vibrant color bursts almost shockingly through the deadened destruction.

I appreciate these photographs. They tell a different story than the television and magazine pictures we all have grown weary of seeing. Burkholder's visually enticing images in some ways more poignantly magnify the suffering and personal loss from Katrina. I like that he only gives a title to each shot rather than providing caption text. He seems to be asking that we let the photographs speak for themselves. And they do. With an affecting honestly that quite literally trumps any newscast or documentary photographic essay that you have seen so far.
gothic pictures of current reality March 22 2009
By hightide - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Dan Burkholder has taken the most haunting photographs of New Orleans after Katrina. The pictures utilize high dynamic range imaging to transport you into the reality of post Katrina New Orleans as opposed to the picture we have in our mind from news reports. This truer reality is a thousand things at once. You see familiar products, even board games left on a bookshelf, and yet everything looks like something out of a medieval legend--after the dragon left, perhaps.

These picures seem at first to make destruction beautiful. Then you look more closely and you can easily imagine what these locations once looked like. In a way, it reminds me of the Buddist monks who make the beautiful sand sculptures only to destroy them. The book absolutely earns its evocative title.
Excellent Service and A Memorable Book Jan. 18 2011
By Janie Taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The vendor responded immediately to the order and shipped promptly. I would definitely recommend this vendor and will return to his site again. The gently used book in this order is in excellent condition. It was a gift to a friend who is delighted with this memorable photography volume. The book is alive with heartbreaking images of loss and ruin filmed to producing an eerie beauty. It also triggers lingering thoughts of people who lived intimately in these settings.
Very, very special Aug. 4 2010
By Jack Kennealy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Dan Burkholder's use of HDR digital image processing is, to me, the most effective and dramatic use of HDR that I have ever seen - and I've seen a lot. In addition, Dan's selection of scenes to shoot shows immense sensitivity to the deeply personal losses experienced by people there in the wake of Katrina. This is an extraordinary book that will easily stand the test of time and forever be an outstanding record of how countless lives were so sadly trashed by Katrina.


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