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The Concrete Blonde Mass Market Paperback – Jul 15 1995


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 390 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks (July 15 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312955006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312955007
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 10.7 x 3.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,224,048 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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The house in Silverlake was dark, its windows as empty as a dead man's eyes. Read the first page
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua on Jan. 26 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"The Concrete Blonde" is Michael Connelly's third book, was first published in 1994 and - like his previous two - features Harry Bosch as its central character. A little of Bosch's background, and many of his quirks, have been touched onin the previous two books. He's a jazz fan, with a taste for coffee, beer and cigarettes. Having served as a Tunnel Rat in Viet-Nam, he' returned home and joined the police force. Bosch currently works at the Hollywood Division's Homicide table, though he had once been a member of the LAPD's elite RHD (Robbery - Homicide Division). The last case he worked in RHD, about four years previously, had been the "Dollmaker Case". Harry and his colleagues were hunting a serial killer, whose afvoured victims were prostitutes. The case was closed when Harry shot and killed Norman Church, the leading suspect. As a result of his actions, however, Bosch was investigated by IAD (Internal Affairs Division), suspended for a month and 'demoted' to his current position.

The Dollmaker Case resurfaces in this book. Bosch and the Police Department are being sued by Church's widow, claiming that her husband was innocent and that Harry had killed the wrong man. Her lawyer is Honey Chandler, a civil rights attorney who specialises in police abuse cases. Bosch meanwhile - like the police department - have no doubt that Church was the Dollmaker, and "good" for the eleven killings. Unfortunately, for Bosch there's a fly in the ointment. Just as the trial starts, a new body is found buried beneath a concrete slab in a derelict building. The directions to it were contained in a note delivered to Harry's station - not only does it claim responsibility for the murder, but it also matches some other notes attributed to the Dollmaker.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Diane Keenan on Dec 21 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I curled up in bed on a snowy day and started this book and I didn't put I down till it was finished.I think one of his best
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By Hugh Murray on July 22 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love the Harry Bosch series, anyway. There's lots of real life drama and surprises throughout . The continuity of the series is captivating.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 29 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you liked The Black Echo, don't miss this book!

Only Michael Connelly would dream up a story where a beleaguered police detective being sued for use of excessive force would spend every hour outside of the trial tracking down a serial killer. The Concrete Blonde picks up on the back story behind the first book in the series, The Black Echo, in which Harry Bosch it is reported that Bosch had been previously demoted from the elite Robbery-Homicide Division to the Hollywood Division's homicide squad for not having followed the procedure of calling for a back up before shooting and killing a serial murder suspect while the suspect was reaching for his toupee. The Concrete Blonde opens with the scene in which Bosch shot the suspect.

The City of Los Angeles and Harry are being sued by the widow of Norman Church, the man Bosch killed. The widow has a tough attorney and Bosch has a stumble bum from the city attorney's office. The case seeks to exonerate Church from having killed anyone. But Bosch knows better. The evidence pointed to Church being the Dollmaker, a serial killer who applied extensive make up to the victims.

During the trial a shock arrives. Another dead body is found that looks like it has been killed by the Dollmaker . . . but the body is fresher than Church's death. Does this mean that Church wasn't the Dollmaker . . . or is there some, more sinister, explanation?

While Bosch is defending himself in court, another deadly game is being played behind the scenes. Who will win?

For me, The Concrete Blonde nicely captured the strengths of The Black Echo that made that book such a remarkable detective story that introduced this outstanding series. I was glad to see Mr. Connelly return the series to its excellent roots.

Have a ball!
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By m-lee on July 19 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Detective Harry Bosch as a character is totally believable. Mr. Connelly's knowledge from being a crime reporter show beautifully in his novels. Very realistic.
I wish he had better taste in women. He like them sexually desirable, but shallow and self-centered. They always end up dumping him for cold, selfish reasons. They claim to understand the seriousness of his work, and also understand his commitment; but they leave him at his neediest, because only threir (lesser important) needs take precedence. Disgusting.
Hope he figures out he needs to find a real women to build a life with, not just a doll to screw.
Overall, an excellent read!!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Harry Bosch, William Connelly's sleuth, renegade dectective, is on trial for his "murder" of a suspect in the Doll Case murder. Bosch shot and killed the suspect as he reached for his toupe, and his widow wants retribution through litigation. Suddenly, as the trial progresses, another Doll Case-like murder is uncovered, but the Doll Case suspect is supposedly already dead. How can the murderer be dead if the cases continue to arise?
The novel is heavily laced with court proceedings about the widow's revenge, Harry's love affair with the widow of the man he kills in "The Black Echo," and Harry's conviction that the Hollywood police have a copycat murderer (instead of not having caught the right guy the first time).
These two subplots, and primary plot, should have made this one of the better novels, and according to the reviews, most readers liked the latticed effect. I thought it too divisionary. The subplots are necessary, but could have been severely cut to keep the main story in focus. This criticism aside, I liked the novel, but it is the least favorite of mine after reading four of Connelly's other Bosch novels..
"Black Ice" is recommended before reading the "Concrete Blonde."
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